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Republic & Imperial Roman Military, Legionary's or Centurion's  Lorica Squamatae Mail Armour 1st Century

Republic & Imperial Roman Military, Legionary's or Centurion's Lorica Squamatae Mail Armour 1st Century

A super, small collection of original, historical, Imperial Roman and Crusader's artefacts has just been acquired by us and will be added over the next week or so.
A small section panel [of 7 small parts] of an incredibly rare, original Roman military armour mail shirt, around 2000 years old, small pieces but exceptionally historically significant. They would look amazing if nicely framed. Used by both regular Roman Legionaries and high ranking Centurions, Lorica squamata was a scale armour, looking like the skin of a fish. Items such as this were oft acquired in the 18th century by British noblemen touring Northern France and Italy on their Grand Tour. Originally placed on display in the family 'cabinet of curiosities', within his country house upon his return home. A popular pastime in the 18th and 19th century, comprised of English ladies and gentlemen traveling for many months, or even years, througout classical Europe, acquiring antiquities and antiques for their private collections.
A shirt of scale armour would be put on with side or rear lacing and reach to the mid-thigh. The lorica squamatae is a type of scale armour used by the ancient Roman military during the Roman Republic and at later periods. It was made from small metal scales sewn to a fabric backing.

It is typically seen on depictions of standard bearers, musicians, centurions, cavalry troops, and auxiliary infantry, as well as regular legionaries. The somewhat historically inaccurate Roman victory triumph depicting Trajan's victory over the Dacians, the Tropaeum Traiani, shows the majority of legionaries wearing loricae squamatae. A shirt of scale armour was shaped in the same way as a mail lorica hamata, mid-thigh length with the shoulder doublings or cape.

The individual scales (squamae) were either iron or bronze, or alternating metals on the same shirt. They could be tinned as well, one surviving fragment showing bronze scales that were alternately tinned and plain. The metal was generally not very thick, 0.50 mm to 0.80 mm (.020" to .032") perhaps being a common range. Since the scales overlapped in every direction, however, the multiple layers gave good protection. The size ranged from as small as 6.3 mm wide by 9.5 mm tall (1/4" ? 3/8") up to about 5 cm wide by 8 cm tall (2" ? 3"), with the most common sizes being roughly 1.3 cm by 2.5 cm (1/2" ? 1"). Many have rounded bottoms, while others are pointed or have flat bottoms with the corners clipped off at an angle. The scales could be flat, or slightly domed, or have a raised midrib or edge. All the scales in a shirt would generally be of the same size; however, scales from different shirts may vary significantly.

The scales were wired or laced together in horizontal rows that were then laced or sewn to the backing. Therefore, each scale had from four to 12 holes: two or more at each side for wiring to the next in the row, one or two at the top for fastening to the backing, and sometimes one or two at the bottom to secure the scales to the backing or to each other.

There was also a rare type where the backing was a mail lorica hamata, effectively giving two layers of defence, but at the cost of greater weight and expense.

It is possible that the shirt could be opened either at the back or down one side so that it was easier to put on, the opening being closed by ties. Much has been written about scale armour's supposed vulnerability to an upward thrust, but this may be exaggerated.

No examples of an entire lorica squamata have ever been found, but there have been several archaeological finds of very small fragments of such shirts, and individual scales.

The type of armour in which the scales are laced to each other and need no backing at all is known as lamellar armour, while to confuse the matter there is also locking scale in which the scales are wired together without a backing. It can be difficult to tell which type of armour a single scale might have come from, as the Romans did not necessarily have different terms for each type. The typical scale had a vertical pair of holes at each side near the top, plus one or two holes at the top. These armour scales would look superb put together and framed in a display. They are individualy quite small and partially fragmented but easily dwarfed by their historical interest, rarity and significance. Their size and unusual appearance explains much why they are so rarely found, as they are easily corrupted by the centuries once buried, and only identifiable by those that know exactly what they are, thus easily discarded if discovered by the uninformed. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.

Code: 23017

645.00 GBP


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A Wonderful Napoleonic Wars Crown Stamped Military Issue Jäger Rifle, As Used by the 60th Rifle Regt. Before The 95th Was Issued Their Baker Rifle

A Wonderful Napoleonic Wars Crown Stamped Military Issue Jäger Rifle, As Used by the 60th Rifle Regt. Before The 95th Was Issued Their Baker Rifle

Fine walnut full stock, in great polish, with King George IIIrd crown stamp on the reverse side butt. Sighted barrel, with numerous regimental stamps, fitted with rear leaf sight with 600, 500 & 400, yards bevelled lock with brass bank, swinging safety and stamped with its number across the tail, the butt with traditional wooden Jägers patch box, regulation brass mounts, all steel cupped rifle ramrod. An original Napoleonic wars military issue rifle, the 60th Regiment's predecessor to the world renown Baker Rifle later issued to the 95th. Another remarkable thing about this rifle is that is a little more than half the cost today of it's equivalent more well known successor, a regulation issue Baker Rifle. This is due to the fact it does not quite have the fame as associated with the Baker of the 95th Rifles. “De Rottenburg organized his new battalion entirely for the special duties of ‘Riflemen.’ They were to be the ‘eyes of the army.’ He instituted a perfect system of drill for riflemen, and out-post duties; this system he printed in a book, which was afterwards embodied in the book of ‘Field Exercise and Evolutions of the Army,’ with a complimentary order by the Duke of York, then Commander-in-Chief. This rifle was used prior to and during the Napoleonic Wars, the Peninsular War, the War of 1812 in America, and in the period of War of the 100 Days at Waterloo. The men in Hompesch’s British rifle corps were of all nations, [except English and French] and four hundred of the ‘Mounted Riflemen’ formed the nucleus of the new battalion, but they were chiefly Germans, and in Germany Rottenberg placed recruiting officers for the purpose of raising men for Britain's 60th.". "The battalion thus formed was the original of those battalions now so well known, and so distinguished in every sense of the word, as ‘Riflemen.’ The men were dressed and equipped as Jägers. They were armed with rifles, and carried what were called ‘rifle bags’ made of leather, instead of knapsacks; they grew the moustache, and they were dressed in green. In this particular they claim priority, in time, to all other battalions in the British army….” A superbly effective rifle, and a super and fine historical example, with the traditional German style patch box in wood as opposed to the Baker's brass version. A very fine walnut stock, brass furniture, including large ramrod pipes, heavy steel ramrod. Superb tight and crisp action. 28.75 inch rifled octagonal barrel, 44 inches long overall. “The men in Hompesch’s British rifle corps were of all nations, except English and French and four hundred of the ‘Mounted Riflemen’ formed the nucleus of the new battalion, but they were chiefly Germans, and in Germany De Rottenberg placed recruiting officers for the purpose of raising men for Britain's 60th.". "The battalion thus formed was the original of those battalions now so well known, and so distinguished in every sense of the word, as ‘Riflemen.’ The men were dressed and equipped as Jägers. They were armed with rifles, and carried what were called ‘rifle bags’ made of leather, instead of knapsacks; they grew the moustache, and they were dressed in green. In this particular they claim priority, in time, to all other battalions in the British army….” On our previous example, we had a few years ago, it still had inside the patch box, its original hand written label circa 1800, in part English and German, that gave what we believed to be the name of the rifleman 'Kluge' that used it, it's calibre, the gun's number 157, promise right of supply, and notes on it's accuracy at 100 ,150, 200, 250, 300, 400, 500, 600 & 700. [We can enclose with our compliments a copy photo of that list, in our previous Jager rifle of the 60th, just to show to the new owner of this rifle, what it once may also have had stuck within the patch box lid]. Before the standard Baker rifle, which was a near direct copy of this Jäger rifle, replaced the Jäger rifles, this was the rifle acquired by England from Prussia, by the British ordnance, and was issued to the earliest British rifle regiment the 60th, formed in the late 18th century. They were then used in America and Ireland, and then in Spain, Portugal & France in the Napoleonic Wars. These rifles are referred to in British Military Firearms 1650 to 1850 by Howard Blackmore. The story of the earliest British rifle regiment goes as follows; at the end of 1797 - the year in which the Duke of York became colonel in-chief -of the 60th, it was decided to increase British forces in America, and an Act of Parliament was passed authorizing the Crown "to augment His Majesty's 60th Regiment of Infantry by the addition of a Fifth Battalion," to serve in America only, and to consist of foreigners. This battalion, the first green-coated rifle battalion in the Army, was organized under the command of Lieut-Colonel Baron de Rottenburg, of Hompesch's Corps. It was formed of 17 officers and 300 men from Hompesch's Chasseurs, and was dressed in bottle-green cut-away coats with scarlet facings, white waistcoats, blue pantaloons, with black leather helmets and black belts. They were armed, at first, with inferior 'contract' rifles imported from Germany, but after those were rejected this better type and this is one of the ones that was chosen. This fifth or "Jager" battalion served in Ireland in 1798 during the Rebellion, and then proceeded to the West Indies, where, in June, 1799, it received 33 officers and 600 men from Lowenstein's Chasseurs, another regiment of foreigners, at the capture of Surinam in 1791 and afterwards in South and North America. In 1804 an Act was passed authorizing 10,000 foreign troops to serve in England, and the 5th Battalion was brought home in consequence in 1806. It went to Portugal in June, 1808, and from the opening skirmish at Obidos, on 15th August, two days before the battle of Roleia or Rolica down to the end of the war, took part in Wellington's campaigns in Portugal, Spain and the South of France. After the peace, this battalion was disbanded. This rifle is a superb piece and all the metal is in great condition too. In the last picture in the gallery there is a picture of a 60th Rifleman next to a 95th in the Peninsular War. Note the 60th Rifleman's patch box on his Jäger Rifle. The stock has an old service repair to the stock underneath the site. And we noticed inside the patchbox lid another, but feint, [GR] crown military inspection stamp. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 23383

6975.00 GBP


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A Wonderful Near 3000 Year Old Akinakes Short Sword, As Used by the Medes, Scythians, Persians, and the Greeks

A Wonderful Near 3000 Year Old Akinakes Short Sword, As Used by the Medes, Scythians, Persians, and the Greeks

In beautiful condition with very fine patination, and a very scarce pommel style, and one side of the handle appears, very rarely, to still have its original wooden grip plate insert partially remaining. A sword traded with the Eastern Mediterranean Scythians, Persians and Greeks during the the Ist millennium B.C. around 2700 to 3200 years ago. Made in bronze in the Western Asiatic region. Western asiatic bronzes refer to items dating from roughly 1500-500 BC that have also been excavated since the late 1920’s in the Harsin, Khorramabad and Alishtar valleys of the Zagros Mountains of western Iran, especially at the site of Tepe Sialk. Scholars believe they were created by either the Cimmerians or by such related Indo-European peoples as the early Medes and Persians. Such weapons were highly sought after by warriors of many cultures because of their quality, balance and durability. Graduating blade with central rib, scafoid pommel, and fabulous areas of crystallized malachite blue/green patina.
The acinaces, also spelled akinakes or akinaka is a type of short sword used mainly in the first millennium BC in the eastern Mediterranean region, especially by the Medes, Scythians and Persians, then by the Greeks. The akinakes was worn at the hip in an elaborate scabbard. The chape, generally a rounded triangle, could be made of bronze, chased gold or carved ivory, and probably lots of other materials. Just above the chape, a cord was tied around the scabbard, passed around the thigh and then through a slipknot next to the chape. The throat had a large tab, which at its own upper corner was tied through a hole in the weapon belt. 17.75 inches long overall

Code: 21668

2875.00 GBP


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Original Ancient Roman ‘Cross-bow” Fibula Bronze Toga Pin Military Issue, Fine Piece For Higher Ranking Figures in the Legion, Such As a Centurion or Tribune

Original Ancient Roman ‘Cross-bow” Fibula Bronze Toga Pin Military Issue, Fine Piece For Higher Ranking Figures in the Legion, Such As a Centurion or Tribune

A super, small collection of original, historical, Imperial Roman and Crusader's artefacts has just been acquired by us and will be available on Thursday 9th December
Shaped in the form of a roman military crossbow fibula, in bronze.
The paludamentum was usually worn over one shoulder and fastened with a fibula (ancient version of a safety pin). Arguments abound over what shoulder was exposed, but it seems fairly clear that the garment was fastened loosely enough to move around, The paludamentum was a cloak that was specifically associated with warfare. A general donned one for the ceremonial procession leading an army out of the sacred precinct of the city of Rome and was required to remove it before returning to the city…a sign that he was no longer a general, but a common citizen. The paludamentum or sagum purpura (purple cloak) was the iconic red cloak worn by a Roman general (Legatus) and his staff officers. Originally, it’s distinctive red/purple color clearly delineated between these officers and the rest of the army, which sported the sagum gregale (cloak of the flock). Although the sagum gregale, worn by the rank and file, started out the color of the flock (i.e. undyed wool), it seems likely to have transitioned to a coarser version of the sagum purpura by the imperial period (27BCE – 476CE). Outfitting the entire army in red garments would have been a mark of the great wealth of Rome – well, that and the fact that the Romans controlled the source of purple dye by then.

Code: 23965

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A Wonderful Antique Meteorite Steel Indonesian Kris with Engraved Royal Crown With a 'Diamond' Hilt Collar

A Wonderful Antique Meteorite Steel Indonesian Kris with Engraved Royal Crown With a 'Diamond' Hilt Collar

The whole sword is beautiful, the hardwood scabbard has a fabulous age patina as has the carved hardwood hilt which also has a 'diamond' collar. They are all somewhat crude 'old cuts' that are poor at refracting light, therefore they might be Indian Moghul diamonds, or even 'old cut' rock crystal stones, it is near impossible to tell, they have not a great deal of intrinsic value either way, due to their cut, but most intriguing none the less.
the traditional steel of the best indonesian kris often contain meteorite steel that fell from the heavens, and the Different types of whetstones, acidic juice of citrus fruits and poisonous arsenic bring out the contrast between the dark black iron and the light coloured silvery nickel layers which together form pamor, damascene patterns on the blade. The distinctive pamor patterns have specific meanings and names which indicate the special magical properties they are believed to impart. The Kris Panjang is worn generally by the Malayan aristocracy. I have seen some beautiful specimens of this weapon in Rumbowe, worn by the chiefs of that state.
Thomas John Newbold, in 1839 wrote lamination patterns that are created in their forging can be simply stunning, as this this beautiful piece. The yellow-white metal scabbard cover is beautifully engraved, on the outer side, and mostly plain on the inner side, but both sides bear an elaborate engraved royal crown.
Different types of whetstones, acidic juice of citrus fruits and poisonous arsenic bring out the contrast between the dark black iron and the light coloured silvery nickel layers which together form pamor, damascene patterns on the blade. The distinctive pamor patterns have specific meanings and names which indicate the special magical properties they are believed to impart. Kris blades are forged by a technique known as pattern welding, one in which layers of different metals are pounded and fused together while red hot, folded or twisted, adding more different metals, pounded more and folded more until the desired number of layers are obtained. The rough blade is then shaped, filed and sometimes polished smooth before finally acid etched to bring out the contrasting colours of the low and high carbon metals. The traditional Indonesian weapon allegedly endowed with religious and mystical powers. With probably a traditional Meteorite laminated iron blade with hammered nickel for the contrasting pattern. 15 inch blade

Code: 23974

780.00 GBP


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An Original French 1833 Gladius Combat  Short Sword

An Original French 1833 Gladius Combat Short Sword

French Model 1831 Infantry Gladius Short Sword. Chatellerault 1832. Pihet Freres Mid 19th C French artillery gladius type sword with 19 inch blade engraved Chatelleraeult 1833. This pattern of Gladius is named after its direct original version, the ancient Roman sword used by the Roman Empire for hundreds of years.however this gladius was made and used in France from the 1830's till the 1850's up to the crimean war against Russia. After the war many French gladius were sold in the early 1860's to the USA in order to supply their desperate need for arms for the Civil War. The US in fact found this pattern sword so effective it was directly copied by America. They copied their French gladius sword, and made their own slightly different version, with an Eagle decorated pommel for use by the US foot. The Pihet brothers were private contractors who cast the hilt and then assembled the sword using a blade made by the Government armoury at Chatellerault. This form of stout sword was incredibly efficient at close quarter combat, in fact the Romans discovered so and used it for centuries, and it's power and effectiveness, when used by well trained legionaries and gladiators, was never bettered for almost 2000 years.This very French sword type appears, and is illustrated, in 'American Swords and Maker's Marks' by Clegg Donald Furr, as the US Civil War imported short sword. In fact many are still unaware it is a French made sword, as it has been [quite wrongly] frequently attributed as an American sword, by some, for many decades. We show this sword in totally 'sleeper' condition as it has remained untouched for likely over 100 years. No scabbard

Code: 23973

295.00 GBP


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A Beautiful circa 2nd Century Ancient Imperial Roman Symbolic Seal Ring Engraved with a Hare

A Beautiful circa 2nd Century Ancient Imperial Roman Symbolic Seal Ring Engraved with a Hare

A super, small collection of original, historical, Imperial Roman and Crusader's artefacts has just bee acquired by us and will be added over the next week or so.
Hares were sacred to Venus/Aphrodite and Eros in the ancient Roman and Greek religions respectively and are often portrayed in depictions of the love goddesses. Ancient Greek practices even involved engraving hares on wedding rings and wedding bowls, and in both cultures, it was commonplace for lovers to exchange live hares as gifts to one another. The luckiness of a rabbit’s foot still familiar today also dates back to antiquity, with hares understood to be symbols of luck in late antiquity, perhaps a contributing factor to their hunted status.

It was previously thought that the Romans introduced the brown hare to the British Isles, given that hares were so important to Roman culture and would therefore have been transported with soldiers and settlers. However, recent evidence suggests that these hares were already established when the Romans arrived in Britain; although, that is not to say that the Romans had little impact on the place of hares in culture and society.
Henig type Xb. Wide oval bezel affixed to flattened shoulders engraved copper alloy. Almost identical to one found in the UK near Hadrian's Wall. That one was engraved to represent the Zaroastrian fire altar, or vessel of sprouting grains. The ring was important for displaying the Roman's status. For example Tiberius, who was after all left-handed according to Suetonius, thus displays a ring in his bronze portrait as the Pontifex Maximus:
So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.
The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one. Shown in the gallery in a display box, that one is not included but another box will be provided free of charge

Code: 23971

385.00 GBP


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British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

British Army Ghurkha Service Kukri, Combat /Jungle Service Gulf War Period “Better to Die Than Be a Coward” is the Motto of these World-Famous Soldiers

Given as a gift from a Ghurkha regiment Service. A no.2 kukri is a training, exercise, and combat knife. it is a field knife for the soldiers. It is worn in no.2 dress or also known as the combat/jungle uniform. Service no.2 kukri sees a lot of cutting, hacking, slicing, etc as expected by any knife. Some also take it to battle fields should the need be.Gurkha soldiers in an SAS unit reportedly took Islamic State gunmen captive after threatening to behead them with their famous kukri knives.

Up to a dozen gunmen are believed to have been captured when a British special forces team raided a terrorist “safe house” in Syria.

The team, which contained four Gurkha soldiers, had been told to capture the Islamic State fighters alive. After approaching their hideout, an interpreter told the men inside to surrender.

But when they refused, the Gurkhas emerged and brandished their renowned curved kukri knives,

The interpreter is then said to have shouted: "These four men are members of the Gurkhas. They come from the hills of Nepal."They are famous warriors who do not fear death. If they have to come in to get you they will behead you with their curved knives."

A defence source said the windows in one of the buildings soon opened and the gunmen hurled out their weapons. This is arguably the toughest soldier in the world .
Hailing from the mountainous region of Nepal, the Gurkhas were first witnessed by the world when they were invaded over 200 years ago by the British East India Company. Suffering immense casualties, the British forces were eager to sign a hasty peace treaty. A soldier even noted in his memoirs: “I never saw more steadiness or bravery exhibited in my life. Run they would not, and of death they seemed to have no fear."According to the peace treaty's terms, the Gurkhas were allowed to join the East India Company's army. Since then, more than 200,000 Gurkhas fought in virtually every military campaign — the World Wars, Afghanistan, and even the brief 1982 Falklands War. The Gurkhas' eagerness for battle comes at a cost, however — 43,000 of them died during WWI and WWII. Although they have suffered heavy losses, their heroic actions haven't gone unnoticed. The UK's highest award for military bravery, valour and gallantry, the Victoria Cross, has only has only ever been awarded, during the past 170 years, around 1350 times. It is likely the most difficult to qualify for, the most highly prized, and the most respected and valuable medal in the world. An incredible 26 have been awarded to servicemen in the Gurkha Regiments.

Code: 23972

185.00 GBP


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Christmas 2021 Is Knocking at the Door!! The Lanes Armoury, A Magical Gallery of History and Wonders!!

Christmas 2021 Is Knocking at the Door!! The Lanes Armoury, A Magical Gallery of History and Wonders!!

Now is the perfect time to choose a wonderful unique gift from The Lanes Armoury, probably the oldest established antique company of our kind still trading in Britain, so you can choose that perfect piece for Christmas, even if it's for yourself!!

Unique, rare and beautiful items, both ancient and modern, are our speciality, and this year we have probably the best and most diverse selection we have ever offered, from Charles Dickens first editions, to a 300,000 year old flint axe, and an original sword once used by a Viking King and over 1000 years old.

So, be sure and certain that anything from us will be the best possible choice you can make this Christmas time. Every item will also be accompanied with our unique, presentation quality, 'Certificate of Authenticity' that will not only fully certify it's genuineness, but it will detail the circumstance of it's origin, and where and when it may have been used in it's specific or generic history. And please be further assured, all gift purchases may be changed after Christmas for any form of suitable alternatives.

Plus.... Gift Vouchers are a wonderful and popular option

Code: 23970

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Most Attractive 18th Century Pirates & Corsairs  Pistol With Chiselled Barrel & Tutaneg Mounts

Most Attractive 18th Century Pirates & Corsairs Pistol With Chiselled Barrel & Tutaneg Mounts

Part of a fabulous small select collection of original early maritime piratical pieces we acquired. Fine walnut stock, cast tutaneg mounts and a very finely engraved flintlock action, with a chiselled and brass inlaid barrel,18th century and used in the Napoleonic Wars era. This is exactly the type of flintlock one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old and more recent Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A beautifully sprauncy sidearm, with long flared barrel. This is an original, honest and impressive antique flintlock that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This super piece may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the very form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. Tutaneg was an exotic imported metal and popular in the 18th to 19th century. It was referred as such in Voyages and Descriptions by the great Capt. William Dampier. [1652-1715]. And in Daniel Defoe's book of The Adventures of Robert Drury. It resembled silver but stronger like nickel, and was a metal used in England and other nations for small items of interest where silver was not practical. It's use died out in the 19th century. William Dampier was the first Englishman to explore parts of what is today Australia, and the first person to circumnavigate the world three times. He has also been described as Australia's first natural historian, as well as one of the most important British explorers of the period between Sir Walter Raleigh and James Cook.

After impressing the British Admiralty with his book, A New Voyage Round the World, Dampier was given command of a Royal Navy ship and made important discoveries in western Australia, but was court-martialled for cruelty. On a later voyage, he rescued Alexander Selkirk, a former crewmate who may have inspired Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Others influenced by Dampier include James Cook, Lord Nelson, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. It was the type of pistol as was used by the ilk of many corsairs and privateers during their voyages around the globe when this ideal weapon was required in all locations. Made in the Ottoman Empire with heavy Continental influences. Made for use on horseback and carried in a saddle holster. Typical simulated ramrod in bone or ivory.10.5 inch barrel 16.5 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables

Code: 20764

1395.00 GBP


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