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Japanese WW2 Signed Shingunto Officer's Katana

A superb condition sword, signed blade [possibly Nobuhide], just returned from being professionally 'artisan' cleaned, [but importantly not restored]. So it now looks just as it was when it was captured in WW2 by a British officer in 1945. Just a little discolouration to one side of the kabutogane. You might never be able to find a better condition original regulation Shingunto Japanese officer's sword from WW2. Surrendered in Burma to an officer in the South Wales Borderers. We had his sergeant's Japanese surrendered sword last month. The 6th Battalion, South Wales Borders served in the Burma Campaign with the 72nd Infantry Brigade, 36th British Infantry Division, previously a division of the British Indian Army before being re-designated the 36th British Division. The division was initially in reserve for the Second Arakan campaign in early 1944, but was called on to relieve the besieged 7th Indian infantry Division after early setbacks. After the Japanese were defeated at the Battle of Ngakyedauk, 7th Division was withdrawn and 36th Division took over the offensive in the Kalapanzin River Valley. Units of the division captured the vital eastern railway tunnel linking the Kalapanzin valley with the port of Maungdaw.

The division withdrew for a brief rest at Shillong in Assam, and was then despatched to Ledo, where it came under command of the American-led Northern Combat Area Command.
Early in July 1944, the division started to fly into Myitkyina airfield in North Burma, with 72nd Brigade being the first formation to land. On 1 September 1944, shortly after the division had started advancing down the "Railway valley" from Mogaung towards Indaw on the right flank of NCAC, the division was renamed the British 36th Division. On 14 December, a third brigade was added to the division; confusingly, this was the first Indian formation that the division commanded (the 26th Indian Infantry Brigade, of one British and two Indian battalions).

The division was distinguished for being the only British division to rely entirely on air supply, mainly by the United States' Tenth Air Force, for an extended period. The United States Army Air Force also provided the division with 12 light aircraft equipped for casualty evacuation and a US Army engineer company to construct its airstrips. Initially, the division was without its own divisional artillery and instead relied on a Chinese artillery group under US command.
The division, having linked up with the main body of Lieutenant General William "Bill" Slim's British Fourteenth Army, crossed the Irrawaddy River and advanced independently down the eastern side of the river. Units from the division suffered losses forcing the crossing the 300 yard wide Shweli River, but the division continued to advance until the fall of Mandalay in March 1945.

Code: 23259

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A Most Fine and Huge Bore 1840's Spring Bayonet Ship's Captain's Pistol

Made by Bentley of Liverpool, an overcoat man-stopper stiletto-pistol of carbine bore. Turn-off barrel breech loader. Micro chequered grip, octagonal Damascus twist steel barrel, catch release spring loaded stiletto shaped bayonet. Nice tight and crisp sidelock percussion action. This is a pistol intended for use by an officer and gentleman who seriously meant business in his choice of arm, for both defence and offence. It was the combination of accuracy, speed and durability that made the turn-off breech loading pistol such a favourite. Pirates and highwaymen were especially noted for the large number of guns that filled their pockets, hung from their belts, or were tied to ribbons. There was no time for re-loading once a ship had been boarded or a fight had begun, and it was therefore a good idea to have several shots available. Even the notorious Captain Jack Sparrow carried a Queen Anne pistol! At the end of the movie Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, the character of Jack Sparrow hands a turn-off pistol to Angelica, saying “One pistol. One shot.”

In 1807, Reverend Alexander Forsyth invented the percussion system which rapidly eclipsed the flintlock. One of the great virtues of the percussion design was that pistols could be manufactured to any size, even very small pieces were easily stowed in a pocket. As the century progressed, the larger and longer-barrelled guns became more and more refined until they were the most popular designs of pocket pistol. Some very small types were known as “muff pistols”,as they were made especially for ladies, to conceal in their hand-muffs, from which the gun could easily be drawn to stop any villain in his tracks.

The caplock system was also much simpler than the flintlock mechanism, with fewer parts, making the overall contour smoother and less likely to catch and tear a pocket or leave the owner struggling to free the gun while his target gets away. Gunmakers all over the world jumped at the opportunity to meet the supply for the ever-growing demand, however the versiona made with spring loaded bayonets such as this were less than one in a thousand.

Code: 23257

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A Most Fine Museum Worthy Ancient Koto Era Handachi Tachi Made Around 1450

A stunning, ancient Koto sword, formerly part of the esteemed Ron Gregory Collection [world renown Japanese Sword Reference Book Author]. Complete and untouched, with all its original Edo period koshirae [mountings] including a most rare tsukaito [hilt binding] of silk interwoven with brass wire in a herringbone pattern, [a remarkably complex and skillfull achievement]. The o-suriage blade is in original polish and looks singularly fine and beautiful. The Higo style koshirae are all a fully matching inlaid with silver curlicues of Arabesques on an iron ground. This is a simply remarkable early tachi, and an absolute joy to hold, admire and indeed own. We have a complete summary of its details that was undertaken some years ago, . The aged tsukaito is surface worn in areas but its beauty and rarity is exceptional. A blade of most impressive, elegant and deep curvature, typical of the early samurai sword of the Nambokochu to Muromachi era [1333 to 1573]. As is often with ancient swords the story of it's use starts in the era before it was actually made, by it's master smith.The Nanbokochu era was spanning from 1336 to 1392, it was a period that occurred during the formative years of the Muromachi bakufu of Japan's history.
The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-cho period were in relatively close proximity, but
geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:
Northern capital : Kyoto
Southern capital : Yoshino.
During this period, there existed a Northern Imperial Court, established by Ashikaga Takauji in Kyoto, and a Southern Imperial Court, established by Emperor Go-Daigo in Yoshino.
Ideologically, the two courts fought for fifty years, with the South giving up to the North in 1392.
However, in reality the Northern line was under the power of the Ashikaga shoguns and had little real independence. This sword would very likely have been made before and used in the Onin War (1467-1477) which led to serious political fragmentation and obliteration of domains: a great struggle for land and power ensued among bushi chieftains and lasted until the mid-sixteenth century. Peasants rose against their landlords and samurai against their overlords, as central control virtually disappeared. An early Japanese print in the gallery shows a samurai receiving his reward of a fine tachi [such as this one] from his shugo daimyo lord. The shugo daimyo were the first group of men to hold the title "daimyo". They arose from among the shugo during the Muromachi period. The shugo daimyo held not only military and police powers, but also economic power within a province. They accumulated these powers throughout the first decades of the Muromachi period.
Major shugo daimyo came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ouchi, and Akamatsu. The greatest ruled multiple provinces.

The Ashikaga shogunate required the shugo daimyo to reside in Kyoto, so they appointed relatives or retainers, called shugodai, to represent them in their home provinces. Eventually some of these in turn came to reside in Kyoto, appointing deputies in the provinces.

The Onin War was a major uprising in which shugo daimyo fought each other. During this and other wars of the time, kuni ikki, or provincial uprisings, took place as locally powerful warriors sought independence from the shugo daimyo. The deputies of the shugo daimyo, living in the provinces, seized the opportunity to strengthen their position. At the end of the fifteenth century, those shugo daimyo who succeeded remained in power. Those who had failed to exert control over their deputies fell from power and were replaced by a new class, the "sengoku daimyo", who arose from the ranks of the shugodai'K and Ji-samurai

Code: 23254

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A Very Good 1889 Pattern British Army Staff Sergeants Sword for 'The Buffs'

This rarely encountered 1889 pattern infantry Staff Sergeant’s sword was made in February 1896 by Robert Mole .

The straight, single-edged blade has a wide three-quarter length fuller on each side below a thick, flat spine and terminates in a spear point. The spine is thick at the shoulder. These P1889 swords are robust fighting swords and were the primary weapon of infantry Staff Sergeants. The etched panel blade is double-edged for the last 250mm and is in excellent condition.

The forte of the blade is stamped with the War Department WD and arrow, a Mole inspection stamp and a bend test stamp.

The gothic steel hilt is in excellent condition and very robust. The hilt bears Queen Victoria’s royal cypher. The quillon is marked to the East Kent regiment 'The Buffs' with the date, May 1896 The shagreen grip and twisted wire are in great condition and the blade is firm in the hilt.

The sword is complete with its matching steel scabbard with two fixed suspension rings. The scabbard throat bears the regimental stamp as well. The side of the throat bears a date and WD and arrow stamps. Lower down, between the suspension rings the edge of the scabbard is stamped with the WD and arrow of the War Department and an inspection stamp. The scabbard is in very good condition there is mild surface finish loss and speckling on both sides The sword sheathes and draws smoothly and is held firmly within the scabbard.
This is an excellent and regimentaly marked to the East Kent Regiment [The Buffs] example of a rare Victorian, Boer War period Staff Sergeant’s sword. These are not often seen. The Buffs saw action during the Second Boer War with Captain Naunton Henry Vertue of the 2nd Battalion serving as brigade major to the 11th Infantry Brigade under Major General Edward Woodgate at the Battle of Spion Kop where he was mortally wounded in January 1900

Code: 23244

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A Superb 1827 Pattern Victorian Royal Naval Officer's Dress cum Combat Sabre

With its original scabbard in brass and leather. Fancy etched fighting weight combat blade, with warranted mark. Bespoke made. In overall stunning condition, with all its original fire gilt remaining to the stunning hilt, that gives the appearance that externally it has been air-tight stored since it was retired from service, and used from the period of the 1840's up to the 1900's. Used in the era when the Royal Navy still used the magnificent 100 gunner 'Man O' War' galleons, then moving into the age steam battleships, and into the great 'Iron Clads' that were being produced for the new form of naval warfare. It was from this era that the world was to see the end of the great sailing ships that coursed the seven seas for the greatest navy the world has ever known. The Royal Navy had not been keen to sacrifice its advantage in steam ships of the line, but was determined that the first British ironclad would outmatch the French ships in every respect, particularly speed. A fast ship would have the advantage of being able to choose a range of engagement which could make her invulnerable to enemy fire. The British specification was more a large, powerful frigate than a ship-of-the-line. The requirement for speed meant a very long vessel, which had to be built from iron. The result was the construction of two Warrior-class ironclads; HMS Warrior and HMS Black Prince. The ships had a successful design, though there were necessarily compromises between 'sea-keeping', strategic range and armor protection; their weapons were more effective than those of Gloire, and with the largest set of steam engines yet fitted to a ship they could steam at 14.3 knots (26.5 km/h).[16] Yet the Gloire and her sisters had full iron-armor protection along the waterline and the battery itself. Warrior and Black Prince (but also the smaller Defence and Resistance) were obliged to concentrate their armor in a central "citadel" or "armoured box", leaving many main deck guns and the fore and aft sections of the vessel unprotected. The use of iron in the construction of Warrior also came with some drawbacks; iron hulls required more regular and intensive repairs than wooden hulls, and iron was more susceptible to fouling by marine life.One picture in the gallery is a British Man O' War HMS MarlboroughHMS Marlborough was a first-rate three-decker 131 gun screw ship built for the Royal Navy in 1855. She was begun as a sailing ship of the line (with her sister ships HMS Duke of Wellington, HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Royal Sovereign), but was completed to a modified design and converted to steam on the stocks, and another the Bombardment, by the Royal Navy ship, HMS Bulldog, of Bomarsund, during the Crimean War. Traditional hilt with fine traditional detailing of a Royal Navy crowned fouled anchor, with shagreen wire bound grip, and copper gilt and leather mounted scabbard. Used in the incredible days of the Crimean War against Russia, and in the Baltic Sea, in Royal Naval service in the days of the beginning of the great steam driven Ships-of-the-Line. A Victorian officer used this sword for both dress and in combat on the new great warships, that at first glance appear to be ships of Trafalgar vintage, but were fitted with the first massive steam engines. This sword would have been used from then, and into the incredible very beginnings of the Ironclad Battleships. Iron reinforced and armoured ships that developed into the mighty Dreadnoughts of the 20th century that were the mainstay of the most powerful Navy that the world had ever seen. British Naval Officer's swords are traditionally the finest quality swords ever worn by any serving officer of the world's navies. The blade is superbly bright with traces of old salt surface pitting

Code: 23243

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Ancient Egyptian Blue Glazed Hieroglyphic Shabti

Late Period, 664-332 BC
Shabtis (or ushabtis) were figurines in mummified form, which were placed in Egyptian tombs to do any work required by the deceased in the afterlife. They were inscribed with a special formula (Shabti formula), which would call them to life when recited. Sometimes shabtis were also inscribed with passages from the Book of the Dead, the intention of which was to secure safety for the deceased in the afterlife. Shabtis were mostly made of faience, but wood, bronze, and stone were also used – towards the Late Period, the number of shabtis inside the tomb increased, eventually allowing one for each day of the year.

A pale blue-glazed composition shabti with tripartite wig and false beard, vertical column of dedication hieroglyphic text to the lower body, plain dorsal pillar and square base. The Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXVI, alternatively 26th Dynasty or Dynasty 26) was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest in 525 BC (although others followed). The dynasty's reign (664–525 BC) is also called the Saite Period after the city of Sais, where its pharaohs had their capital, and marks the beginning of the Late Period of ancient Egypt.This dynasty traced its origins to the Twenty-fourth Dynasty. Psamtik I was probably a descendant of Bakenranef, and following the Neo-Assyrian Empire's invasions during the reigns of Taharqa and Tantamani, he was recognized as sole king over all of Egypt. While the Neo-Assyrian Empire was preoccupied with revolts and civil war over control of the throne, Psamtik threw off his ties to the Assyrians circa 655 BC, formed alliances with King Gyges of Lydia, and recruited mercenaries from Caria and ancient Greece to resist Assyrian attacks.

With the sack of Nineveh in 612 BC and the fall of the Assyrian Empire, both Psamtik and his successors attempted to reassert Egyptian power in the Near East, but were driven back by the Neo-Babylonian Empire under Nebuchadnezzar II. With the help of Greek mercenaries, Apries was able to hold back Babylonian attempts to conquer Egypt. The Persians would eventually invaded Egypt in 525 BCE, when their king, Cambyses II, captured and later executed Psamtik III. The Shabti is 43 grams, 99mm (4"] high.

Code: 23233

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Early Christian Silver Crucifix, From the Eastern Roman Empire

A most beautiful artefact of early Christendom. A Byzantine silver cross pendant of the 6th-8th century AD, with low-relief robed figure in orans posture. The orans position has been used as a gesture of pleading and supplication since ancient times. This is true in many pagan religions, including Greco-Roman paganism. The orans position was later present in Judaism as well, and finally many early Christians came to dentify the orans position with the outstretched arms of Christ crucified. This can be seen, for example, in the Brescia Casket. The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, or Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern Istanbul, formerly Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Empire in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe. "Byzantine Empire" is a term created after the end of the realm; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire and to themselves as "Romans" Several signal events from the 4th to 6th centuries mark the period of transition during which the Roman Empire's Greek East and Latin West diverged. Constantine I (r. 324–337) reorganised the empire, made Constantinople the new capital and legalised Christianity. Under Theodosius I (r. 379–395), Christianity became the state religion and other religious practices were proscribed. In the reign of Heraclius (r. 610–641), the Empire's military and administration were restructured and adopted Greek for official use in place of Latin.

Although the Roman state continued and its traditions were maintained, modern historians distinguish Byzantium from ancient Rome insofar as it was centred on Constantinople, oriented towards Greek rather than Latin culture and characterised by Eastern Orthodox Christianity 12.02 grams, 59mm (2 1/4"). Fine condition.

Code: 23234

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A Most Beautiful Solid Silver Hilted English Spadroon Officer's Sword

SOLD Circa 1790. Most English spadroon pattern swords have steel hilts and were used by infantry officers from the 1780's to around 1815, however the silver and gilt hilted types that were much more expensive to buy originally were often the domain of naval or marine officers, as the material was more conducive to the salty corrosive atmosphere of sea water. The grip is carved horn and also bound with silver wire. The blade is straight as usual for maritime service and engraved with a large GR crown, representing the military service of King George IIIrd. Naval officer's swords, before 1803 very rarely had any visual representation at all of naval anchors within the design, that became the representation of the Royal Navy after 1803 and thence forward. We show an original Georgian painting in the gallery that depicts a sword fight aboard a ship, and the very same type of silver hilted spadroon sword is in the hand of a combatant hand. This sword would very likely have seen service in thje Battle of the Nile era.The Battle of the Nile (also known as the Battle of Aboukir Bay; French: Bataille d'Aboukir) was a major naval battle fought between the British Royal Navy and the Navy of the French Republic at Aboukir Bay on the Mediterranean coast off the Nile Delta of Egypt from the 1st to the 3rd of August 1798. The battle was the climax of a naval campaign that had raged across the Mediterranean during the previous three months, as a large French convoy sailed from Toulon to Alexandria carrying an expeditionary force under General Napoleon Bonaparte. The British fleet was led in the battle by Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson; they decisively defeated the French under Vice-Admiral François-Paul Brueys d'Aigalliers. Bonaparte sought to invade Egypt as the first step in a campaign against British India, as part of a greater effort to drive Britain out of the French Revolutionary Wars. As Bonaparte's fleet crossed the Mediterranean, it was pursued by a British force under Nelson who had been sent from the British fleet in the Tagus to learn the purpose of the French expedition and to defeat it. He chased the French for more than two months, on several occasions missing them only by a matter of hours. Bonaparte was aware of Nelson's pursuit and enforced absolute secrecy about his destination. He was able to capture Malta and then land in Egypt without interception by the British naval forces.

With the French army ashore, the French fleet anchored in Aboukir Bay, 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Alexandria. Commander Vice-Admiral François-Paul Brueys d'Aigalliers believed that he had established a formidable defensive position. The British fleet arrived off Egypt on 1 August and discovered Brueys's dispositions, and Nelson ordered an immediate attack. His ships advanced on the French line and split into two divisions as they approached. One cut across the head of the line and passed between the anchored French and the shore, while the other engaged the seaward side of the French fleet.

Trapped in a crossfire, the leading French warships were battered into surrender during a fierce three-hour battle, while the centre succeeded in repelling the initial British attack. As British reinforcements arrived, the centre came under renewed assault and, at 22:00, the French flagship Orient exploded. The rear division of the French fleet attempted to break out of the bay, with Brueys dead and his vanguard and centre defeated, but only two ships of the line and two frigates escaped from a total of 17 ships engaged.

The battle reversed the strategic situation between the two nations' forces in the Mediterranean and entrenched the Royal Navy in the dominant position that it retained for the rest of the war. It also encouraged other European countries to turn against France, and was a factor in the outbreak of the War of the Second Coalition. Bonaparte's army was trapped in Egypt, and Royal Navy dominance off the Syrian coast contributed significantly to the French defeat at the Siege of Acre in 1799 which preceded Bonaparte's return to Europe. Nelson had been wounded in the battle, and he was proclaimed a hero across Europe and was subsequently made Baron Nelson—although he was privately dissatisfied with his rewards. His captains were also highly praised and went on to form the nucleus of the legendary Nelson's Band of Brothers. Another very similar spadroon is in the National Maritime Museum Collection. The hilt has a few small close combat defensive cuts, and the blade with average russetting for age.

Code: 23229

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A Stunning Battle of Trafalgar Period Royal Naval Senior Officer's Sword

SOLD A stunning 1805 pattern Royal Naval sword commonly known as the admiral’s pattern, the very same form of sword as was carried by Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar

Lions-head pommel, much of the original original mercurial gilt finish to the hilt, wire bound Ivory grip [symbolising highest naval rank] and cast anchor langets, fully deluxe engraved with King George IIIrd cypher, crown and naval anchor, plus scrolls and elaborate rose, thistle and shamrock symbology. The blue and gilt finish is also very good indeed. A stunning lighter grade sword, perfect for high dress and combat.

The blade is the traditional straight form with fine engraving and significant amounts of original blue-and-gilt decor present.

In 1805, the Royal Navy decided to introduce some uniformity in the swords carried by it's officers and issued it's first regulation pattern sword. It was the hilt was influenced by the 1803 Infantry sabre which started to be used by Naval and Royal Marine officers. However a straight blade was settled upon, along with a cavalry style stirrup hilt.

Ever at the forefront of military fashion, Lord Horatio Nelson would have been one of the first to adopt the new pattern and after his death in the famous Battle of Trafalgar, his 1805 pattern sword was returned to England with the rest of his belongings. Today his 1805 sword is on display at the Nelson Museum.The Battle of Trafalgar (21 October 1805) was a naval engagement fought by the British Royal Navy against the combined fleets of the French and Spanish Navies during the War of the Third Coalition (August–December 1805) of the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815).

As part of an overall French plan to combine all French and allied fleets to take control of the English Channel and thus enable Napoleon's Grande Armée to invade England, French and Spanish fleets under French Admiral Villeneuve sailed from the port of Cádiz in the south of Spain on 18 October 1805. They encountered the British fleet under Admiral Lord Nelson, recently assembled to meet this threat, in the Atlantic Ocean along the southwest coast of Spain, off Cape Trafalgar, near the town of Los Caños de Meca. Villeneuve was uncertain about engaging the British, and the Franco-Spanish fleet failed to fully organise. In contrast, Nelson was decisive, organising the British fleet into two columns sailing straight into the enemy to pierce its wavering lines.

In a particularly fierce battle, 27 British ships of the line fought 33 French and Spanish ships of the line. Although the lead ships of the British columns were heavily battered, with Nelson's flagship HMS Victory nearly disabled, the greater experience and training of the Royal Navy overcame the greater numbers of the French and Spanish navies. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost 22 ships; the British lost none. During the battle, Nelson was shot by a French musketeer, and he died shortly before the battle ended. Villeneuve was captured along with his flagship Bucentaure. He later attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. Admiral Federico Gravina, the senior Spanish flag officer, escaped capture with the remnant of the fleet. He died five months later from the wounds he had sustained during the battle.

The victory confirmed the naval supremacy Britain had established during the course of the eighteenth century, and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from the prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy of the day. Conventional battle practice at the time was for opposing fleets to engage each other in single parallel lines, in order to facilitate signalling and disengagement and to maximize fields of fire and target areas. Nelson instead arranged his ships into columns sailing perpendicularly into the enemy fleet's line. No scabbard

Code: 23224

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Remember We Are Not Open This Bank Holiday Monday!

However, we re-open this Tuesday as usual, and we are always contactable by email or on 07721 010085 during our closing hours. All website activity carries on 24-7 as usual though. Why not choose an antique sword for your loved one, or even you! Every day we try our utmost to supply all our customers with that something special and unique, and as usual we believe have some amazing offerings, from all over the world, from ancient to vintage, and every one a little part of history. All items supplied with our unique lifetime guarantee of authenticity detailing its full history as known. The Lanes Armoury is proud to be known, as declared by many of our thousands of daily visitors, as their most favourite shop in Great Britain!

Code: 23212

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