HOME PAGECONTACT USABOUT USANNOUNCEMENTSTERMSON-LINE SHOPVIEW BASKETPRIVACY POLICY


click for more images

A Superb and Highly Decorative 18th Century Mediterranean Blunderbuss
Wonderful geometrically scrolled, fully carved stock with roundels and silver wirework inlays. Fully engraved Italianate flintlock with the early, so-called 'banana form' lock plate. It also has a most amusing, heavily chiselled barrel, decorated at the breech with a stylized blunderbuss barrel, its muzzle showing an explosive blast, exuding balls of smoke, and an exploding sunburst ball. At the muzzle end is a stylized man with his arms upheld, effectively, being blasted to smithereens. Carved bone traditional simulated rammer. A very attractive short blunderbuss, designed to swivel from a wide belt. A gun with beauty charm and elegant lines of nice quality. This is exactly the type of flintlock one sees, and in fact expects to see, in all the old Hollywood 'Pirate' films. A beautifully sprauncy sidearm, with long flared barrel. This is an original, honest and impressive antique flintlock that rekindles the little boy in all of us who once dreamt of being Errol Flynn, Swash-Buckling across the Spanish Maine under the Jolly Roger. This super piece may very well have seen service with one of the old Corsairs of the Barbary Coast, in a tall masted Galleon, slipping it's way down the coast of the Americas, to find it's way home to Port Royal, or some other nefarious port of call in the Caribbean. It is exactly the very form of weapon that was in use in the days of the Caribbean pirates and privateers, as their were no regular patterns of course. This type of gun is essentially a Turko-Ottoman example, of type that were expensive at the time, often referred to as knee blunderbuss, that were efficient and much prized and thus an essential part of the pirate's trade, they didn't conform to a regular pattern, but more a 'form follows function' ethos. A good curvature, a medium weight that suits a comfortable grip but could be hung from a waist belt or cross belt while the pirate climbed the rigging or leapt into a jolly boat from the deck. There is an old painting of a pirate carrying a similar flintlock of the same type in the very same way from a swivel on his cross belt. It was written that after Queen Anne's War, which ended in 1713, cast vast numbers of naval seamen into unemployment and caused a huge slump in wages. Around 40,000 men found themselves without work at the end of the war - roaming the streets of ports like Bristol, Portsmouth and New York. In wartime privateering provided the opportunity for a relative degree of freedom and a chance at wealth. The end of war meant the end of privateering too, and these unemployed ex-privateers only added to the huge labour surplus. Queen Anne's War had lasted 11 years and in 1713 many sailors must have known little else but warfare and the plundering of ships. It was commonly observed that on the cessation of war privateers turned pirate. The combination of thousands of men trained and experienced in the capture and plundering of ships suddenly finding themselves unemployed and having to compete harder and harder for less and less wages was explosive - for many piracy must have been one of the few alternatives to starvation. Euro-American pirate crews really formed one community, with a common set of customs shared across the various ships. Liberty, Equality and Fraternity thrived at sea over a hundred years before the French Revolution, and continued for many years after. The authorities were often shocked by their libertarian tendencies; the Dutch Governor of Mauritius met a pirate crew and commented: "Every man had as much say as the captain and each man carried his own weapons in his blanket". Another interesting fact in regards to piracy in the early late 18th to 19th century. His Britannic Majesty's Government used to protect, through a mixture of tribute and deterrence all Anglo American shipping during, and after the American Revolution, from the corsair barbary pirates of Tripoli. However after the war's end, and when America was informed by England that she would have to deal with the pirates direct to protect American shipping, it was decided America would have to pay it' own tribute to the pirates in order to leave US ships alone. Eventually that amount grew to an incredible 20% of America's entire annual revenue from it's GDP. This tribute blackmail was unsustainable, so Thomas Jefferson decided to send a squadron under commodore Dale, to the region. War thus ensued between America and Tripoli. In 1801 the Schooner USS Enterprise was sent to fight the Corsairs, but disguised as a British war vessel flying the British ensign. When approached It struck it's false colours, raised the US flag, and engaged the pirate ship Tripoli, and although after three times that the Tripoli feigned surrender, in order to fire treacherous broadsides against the Enterprise, it still gave it a jolly sound thrashing. However with the morale boost to the US, and the depression caused to the Tripolitans the war continued for three more years. This is the very kind of gun that would have seen combat in that conflict. It is an 18th century flintlock of Mediterranean origin, and although it has signs of combat wear is still in lovely order, and was likely used right into the mid 19th century. It looks highly attractive, in fact beautiful, and it is completely original, an antique flintlock of days long gone past yet not forgotten. As with all our guns they are all unrestricted, antique collectables, with no license required. 18 inches long overall 9 inch barrel.

Code: 20878Price: 1495.00 GBP


click for more images

1821 Pattern, Victorian British Troopers Ordnance Cavalry Sabre
As used in the Crimean War such as the infamous and renown 'Charge of the Light Brigade'. A most impressive sabre, and very good indeed. The very type of ordnance made and issued Hussar's and Lancer's trooper's sabre used by British Cavalry in the ill fated charge in the Crimean War against Russia. All steel three bar steel hilt, combat blade with leather covered wooden ribbed grip with original copper triple wire binding. Absolutely used at the time and used by all the serving cavalry troopers in the famous 'Charge'. In the Crimean War (1854-56), the Light Dragoons were in the forefront of the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized by Tennyson's poem of that name ("Into the valley of death rode the six hundred").
The regiments adopted the title hussars at this time, and the uniform became very stylish, aping the hussars of the Austro-Hungarian army. But soon the blues and yellows and golds gave way to khaki as the British army found itself in skirmishes throughout the far-flung Empire, in India and South Africa especially.
For example in 1854 the 13th Hussars regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a
troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of
Cardigan) were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera.
On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route.
On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by
late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry in reserve.
During the 25 October the regiments, the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade.
The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the
4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his
men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed,
they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavoring to surround them
by closing in on either flank. However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. Capt. Louis Edward Nolan (January 4 1818-October 25 1854), who was a British Army officer of the Victorian era, an authority on cavalry tactics, and best known for his controversial role in launching the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Battle of Balaclava. He was the first casualty of that engagement. No scabbard. Great steel and grip patina, no scabbard

Code: 20877Price: 685.00 GBP


click for more images

British WW1 Rifle Volunteer Regimental Military Bugle
The National Reserve was a register of trained officers and men who had no further obligation for military service. Its purpose was to enable an increase in military resources in the event of imminent national danger. The register was maintained by the County Associations that also organised the Territorial Force and they would frame their own rules for organising the reserve within their area. In October 1914 the National Reserve was formed into Protection Companies, which were attached to existing TF battalions, for the guarding of railways and other vulnerable points in Britain. That November, all Class I and II men were ordered to present themselves for enlistment. In March 1915 the Protection Companies were redesignated as Supernumerary Companies TF. In July 1915 there was a widescale trawl of these companies to identify men capable of marching 10 miles with a rifle and 150 rounds of ammunition. Those who were classified as medical Category A went to Service battalions, while Category C’s were posted to Provisional battalions. Cat B men were formed into the 18th-24th Battalions of the Rifle Brigade. These battalions were sent to Egypt and India at the end of 1915 to replace TF units committed to Gallipoli and Mesopotamia. The rump left in Britain eventually formed the 25th Battalion Rifle Brigade TF and served as a Garrison battalion at Falmouth. As for the Supernumerary Companies, they were eventually formed into the Royal Defence Corps.

Code: 20876Price: 195.00 GBP


click for more images

South American 19th Century Brazilian Faca De Ponta Fighting Knife
Rare Antique Brazilian Cangaceiros Faca De Ponta Lampiao Bandit Dagger Knife. Intersperced discs of carved bone and horn handle. Good maker mark logo of a prancing pony. Although made earlier they are now called after the early 20th century bandit leader. Lampião became associated with an established bandit leader, Sebastião Pereira. After only a few months of operating together, in 1922, Pereira decided to retire from banditry; he moved to the State of Goiás and lived there peacefully into advanced old age. Lampião then took over leadership of the remnants of Pereira's band. For the next 16 years, he led his band of cangaceiros, which varied greatly in number from around a dozen to up to a hundred, in a career of large-scale banditry through seven states of the Brazilian Northeast.

Depending on the terrain and other conditions, the bandits operated either on horseback or on foot. They were heavily armed, and wore leather outfits, including hats, jackets, sandals, ammunition belts, and trousers, to protect them from the thorns of the caatinga, the dry shrub and brushwood typical of the dry hinterland of Brazil's Northeast. The police and soldiers stationed in the backlands often dressed in an identical manner; on more than one occasion Lampião impersonated a police officer, especially when moving into a new area of operations, in order to gain information.

The firearms and ammunition of the cangaceiros were mostly stolen, or acquired by bribery, from the police and paramilitary units and consisted of Mauser military rifles and a variety of small arms including Winchester rifles, revolvers and the prized Luger and Mauser semi-automatic pistols.

A strange and contradictory piety ran through Lampião's psyche: while robbing and killing people, he also prayed regularly and reverenced the Church and priests. He wore many religious symbols on his person; presumably, he invested them with talismanic qualities. Like many others in the region he particularly revered Padre Cícero, the charismatic priest of Juazeiro. He was noted for his loyalty to those he befriended or to whom he owed a debt of gratitude. He generously rewarded his followers and those of the population who shielded or materially helped him (coiteros), and he was entirely reliable if he gave his word of honour. Lampião was capable of acts of mercy and even charity, however, he systematically used terror to achieve his own survival. His enmity, once aroused, was implacable and he killed many people merely because they had an association with someone who had displeased him. He is recorded as having said "If you have to kill, kill quickly. But for me killing a thousand is just like killing one". For the cangaceiros murder was not only casual, they took pride in their efficiency in killing. They were excellent shots and were skilled in the use of long, narrow knives (nicknamed peixeiras - "fish-filleters") which could be used to dispatch a man quickly.

Lampião's band attacked small towns and farms in seven states, took hostages for ransom, extorted money by threats of violence, tortured, fire-branded, and maimed; it has been claimed that they killed over 1,000 people and 5,000 head of cattle and raped over 200 women. The band fought the police over 200 times and Lampião was wounded six times. 11 inches long overall

Code: 20875Price: 340.00 GBP


click for more images

An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster
Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.
Good condition 14.75 inches x 9.75 inches

Code: 20874Price: 170.00 GBP


click for more images

A Japanese Cavalry Sabre Type 32 1899 'Ko' Pattern
With an associated blade, probably imported. The hilt back strap Type 32 model, introduced in 1899, is chequered steel (commonly blackened). The wood grips are also chequered. Leather finger loop. Japanese Type 32 (Model 1899) ‘Ko’ Pattern Sword. The type as were often manufactured at the Tokyo Hohei Kosho Arsenal in Tokyo between 1899 and 1923 and issued to Cavalry NCOs (Other Arms Non-Comms were issued with the slightly shorter Type 32 ‘Otsu’ Pattern). This sword replaced the Type 25 (Model 1892) and equipped Imperial Japanese Army Cavalry NCO’s during the Russo Japanese War (1905), WW1 (1914 – 1918), Manchuria (1937 – 1941) and WW2 (1941 – 1945). No scabbard 32 inch blade

Code: 20873Price: 275.00 GBP


click for more images

An Original WW2 British Special Constabulary Recruitment Poster
Published for HMG by Fosh and Cross Ltd London. A propaganda information and recruitment poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.
Good condition 14.5 inches x 9.5 inches

Code: 20872Price: 195.00 GBP


click for more images

16th Century Indian Firangi Sword Circa 1500's Basket Hilt Form
The name ‘Firangi’ (Foreigner) was apparently given to these swords somewhat later in the 17th Century, as they were mounted with European (Foreign) blades, imported by the Portugese, which were highly valued. Some blades were locally made in the European style. The blades were mounted on the ‘Khanda’ style hilt and with the long spike extending from the pommel which enabled them to be used as two handed swords. The firangi sword characteristically had a straight blade of backsword form (single edged). The blade often incorporated one, two, or three fullers (grooves) and had a spear-tip shaped point. The sword could be used to both cut and thrust. Examples with narrow rapier blades have survived, though in small numbers. The hilt was of the type sometimes called the "Indian basket-hilt" and was identical to that of another Indian straight-bladed sword the khanda. The hilt afforded a substantial amount of protection for the hand and had a prominent spike projecting from the pommel which could be grasped, resulting in a two-handed capability for the sword. Like other contemporary Indian swords the hilt of the firangi was usually of iron and the tang of the blade was attached to the hilt using a very strong resin, additionally, the hilt to blade connection was reinforced by projections from the hilt onto either face of the forte of the blade which were riveted together though a hole passing through the blade. Because of its length the firangi is usually regarded as primarily a cavalry weapon. Illustrations suggest a 16th-century date for the development of the sword, though early examples appear to have had simpler cross-guard hilts, similar to those of the talwar. The sword has been especially associated with the Marathas, who were famed for their cavalry. However, the firangi was widely used by the Mughals and those peoples who came under their rule, including Sikhs and Rajputs. Images of Mughal potentates holding firangis, or accompanied by retainers carrying their masters' firangis, suggest that the sword became a symbol of martial virtue and power. Photographs of Indian officers of Hodson's Horse (an irregular cavalry unit raised by the British) show that the firangi was still in active use at the time of the Indian Mutiny in 1857-58 The khanda can generally be a double-edge but can be a single edged straight sword. It is often featured in religious iconography, theatre and art depicting the ancient history of India. Some communities venerate the weapon as a symbol of Shiva. It is a common weapon in the martial arts in the Indian subcontinent. Khanda often appears in Hindu, Buddhist and Sikh scriptures and art The word khanda has its origins in the Sanskrit meaning "to break, divide, cut, destroy". Used from the time of Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar (15 October 1542 – 27 October 1605 ), popularly known as Akbar I literally "the great" and later Akbar the Great, he was the third Mughal emperor, who reigned from 1556 to 1605.
29 inch blade to hilt, 35 inches overall

Code: 20871Price: 795.00 GBP


click for more images

A King George IIIrd Dagger With Napoleonic Mystical Symbol Blade
A heavy quality dagger bearing a wide double edged blade likely made from a reduced length early broadsword. Beautifully engraved on both sides of the blade with a crescent moon with a face, a stand of arms and a sunburst also with a face above, topped with a star. Cast brass hilt with rococo swags beneath a face of a beast to both sides, an offset pommel surmounted with another face. Upswept curved quillon.

Code: 20870Price: 695.00 GBP


click for more images

A Most Impressive & Substantial Edo Japanese Samurai Battle Katana
Due to its size and build most likely for use by a horse mounted samurai. Made circa 1600 to 1650 and mounted in all original Edo fittings, saya and tsuba. Hand pierced iron circular tsuba to represent sea spray. Plain fushi kashira. For roughly a thousand years, from about the 800s to the late 1800s, warfare in Japan was dominated by an elite class of warriors known as the samurai. Horses were their special weapons: only samurai were allowed to ride horses in battle.

Like European knights, the samurai served a lord (daimyo). In 1600, after a long period of conflict among rival daimyo, the victorious Tokugawa Shogun discouraged armed civil warfare, maintained the samurai's traditional status, so internecine warfare continued unabated. The sword and the horse remained symbols of their power.
By the time Ieyasu Tokugawa unified Japan under his rule at the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600, only samurai were permitted to wear the sword. A samurai was recognized by his carrying the feared daisho, the ‘big sword, little sword’ of the warrior. These were the battle katana, the ‘big sword,’ and the wakizashi, the ‘little sword.’ The name katana derives from two old Japanese written characters or symbols: kata, meaning’side,’ and na, or ‘edge.’ Thus a katana is a single-edged sword that has had few rivals in the annals of war, either in the East or the West. Because the sword was the main battle weapon of Japan’s knightly man-at-arms (although spears and bows were also carried), an entire martial art grew up around learning how to use it. This was kenjutsu, the art of sword fighting, or kendo in its modern, non-warlike incarnation. The importance of studying kenjutsu and the other martial arts such as kyujutsu, the art of the bow, was so critical to the samurai — a very real matter of life or death — that Miyamoto Musashi, most renowned of all swordsmen, warned in his classic The Book of Five Rings: ‘The science of martial arts for warriors requires construction of various weapons and understanding the properties of the weapons. A member of a warrior family who does not learn to use weapons and understand the specific advantages of each weapon would seem to be somewhat uncultivated.’ European knights and Japanese samurai have some interesting similarities. Both groups rode horses and wore armour. Both came from a wealthy upper class. And both were trained to follow strict codes of moral behaviour. In Europe, these ideals were called chivalry; the samurai code was called Bushido, "the way of the warrior." The rules of chivalry and Bushido both emphasize honour, self-control, loyalty, bravery, and military training. 29 inch blade.

Code: 20869Price: 4450.00 GBP

Website designed & maintained by Concept500