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An Original WW2 Propganda Warning Poster 'Watch Your Talk For His Sake'
An iconic warning approbation of WW2. A propaganda information warning poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring.

Code: 20935Price: 275.00 GBP


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Code: 20934Price: On Request


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Original WW2 Volunteer Receruitment Poster. 'Lend A Hand On The Land'
A very fine propaganda recruitment poster for the Land Army. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. 14.75 x 19.5 inches

Code: 20933Price: 275.00 GBP


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Code: 20932Price: On Request


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Original WW2 Propaganda Poster, 'Careless Talk Costs Lives'
An iconic warning approbation of WW2. A propaganda information warning poster. Britain re-created the World War I Ministry of Information for the duration of World War II to generate propaganda to influence the population towards support for the war effort. A wide range of media was employed aimed at local and overseas audiences. Traditional forms such as newspapers and posters were joined by new media including cinema (film), newsreels and radio. A wide range of themes were addressed, fostering hostility to the enemy, support for allies, and specific pro war projects such as conserving metal and growing vegetables. In 1940 in particular, Winston Churchill made many calls for the British to fight on, and for British units to fight until they died rather than submit. His calls for fight to victory inspired a hardening of public opinion. Determination raised the numbers of the Home Guard and inspired a willingness to fight to the last ditch, in a manner rather similar to Japanese determination, and the slogan "You can always take one with you" was used in the grimmest times of the war. British victories were announced to the public for morale purposes, and broadcast to Germany for purposes of undermining morale.

Even during Dunkirk, an optimistic spin was put on how the soldiers were eager to return.

When the U-boat commander Günther Prien vanished with his submarine U-47, Churchill personally informed the House of Commons, and radio broadcasts to Germany asked, "Where is Prien?" until Germany was forced to acknowledge his loss.

The turn of the war made BBC's war commentaries much more stirring. 13 X 19.5 inches

Code: 20931Price: 275.00 GBP


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A Fine Signed Shinto O-Tanto Signed Yamoto Daijo Kanehiro.
Signed Shinto Tanto, by a master smith bearing the honorific title Assistant Lord of Yamoto.
A Samurai's personal dagger signed Yamoto Daijo Kanehiro. A Smith who had a very high ranking title A very nice signed Tanto, in full polish, with an early, Koto, Kamakuribori Style Iron Tsuba. The tsuba is probably Muramachi period around 1450, carved in low relief to one side. 6.5cm. Plain early iron Koshira. The blade in nice polish, itami grain and a medium wide sugaha hamon signed with his high ranking official title Yamoto Daijo Kanehiro [Kane Hiro, Assistant Lord of Yamoto Province] circa 1660. He lived in Saga province. Superb original Edo period ribbed lacquer saya.the saya has a usual side pocket to fit a kodzuka utility knife. These knives were always a separate non matching and disconnected part of the dagger. Black silk binding over silver feather menuki. The samurai were bound by a code of honour, discipline and morality known as Bushido or “The Way of the Warrior.” If a samurai violated this code of honour (or was captured in battle), a gruesome ritual suicide was the chosen method of punishment and atonement. The ritual suicide of a samurai or Seppuku can be either a voluntary act or a punishment, undertakan usually with his tanto or wakazashi. The ritual suicide of a samurai was generally seen as an extremely honourable way to die, after death in combat.

Code: 20930Price: 3650.00 GBP


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A Most Intriguing Full Size Austro German Crystal Sword
A swept hilt style with blown crystal handle containing a spiral and a quatrefoil type blade. Undoubtedly a work of art, not by any means a functioning sword, but incredibly impressive with great presence. 39.5 long overall approx 2.5 kilos.

Code: 20929Price: 285.00 GBP


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A WW2 Officer's Balmoral Cap Royal Warwickshire Regt, Monty's Ironsides
An absolute gem of a British Army D-Day Landing collector's piece. An original officer's Balmoral, used from the Normandy D-Day landings onwards right into VE Day by an officer of the Royal Warwicks. A fine and rarely seen original cap with its original bronzed officer's bonnet badge of highest quality [showing a separate wire rope within the design]. The 2nd Battalion Royal Warwicks in World War 2 were part of 185 Brigade 3rd Div. known as Monty's Ironsides. On 6 June 1944, Major-General Bernard Montgomery chose his 'Iron Sides', the famous British 3rd Division, to spearhead the Allied attack on the Normandy beaches on D-Day. As the only division in the British Liberation Army to participate in the savage fighting from D-Day all the way through to VE-Day, the Iron Sides' contribution to victory in Europe was immense. Their courageous efforts won them two Victoria Crosses, but the price in lives was high; the division suffered 15,000 casualties including 2,586 killed in action. The 3rd was probably the most 'British' of all the divisions fighting in North-West Europe. It included the King's Own Scottish Borderers, a Highland gunner regiment, the Royal Ulster Rifles, the two roses of East Yorkshire and South Lancashire, the East Anglians (Suffolk, Norfolk, Lincolns) and the Midlands (Warwick and Shropshire), besides cockneys from the Middlesex Regiment and the Recce Regiment from Northumberland. Excellent condition, interior lining stamped WD.

Code: 20928Price: 225.00 GBP


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A Very Good Armour Piercing Bladed Tanto, Shinshinto Period
1781 till 1863. Exceptionally thick and powerful blade, in full polish showing superb crabclaw hamon with back edge tempering. Fine red lacquer saya with Tokugawa Aoi mon. Buffalo horn fittings with gold inlaid Minuki under original Edo wrap. Kodzuka with nanako ground and two gilt and bronze phoenix in relief. Small hairline cracks in the lacquer near the kodzuka pocket. The tanto was invented partway through the Heian period, when it was mainly used as a weapon. With the beginning of the Kamakura period, tanto were forged to be more aesthetically pleasing, and hira and uchi-sori tanto were the most popular styles for wars in the kamakura period. Near the middle of the Kamakura period, more tanto artisans were seen, increasing the abundance of the weapon, and the kanmuri-otoshi style became prevalent in the cities of Kyoto and Yamato. Because of the style introduced by the tachi in the late Kamakura period, tanto began to be forged longer and wider. The introduction of the Hachiman faith became visible in the carvings in the tanto hilts around this time. The hamon (line of temper) is similar to that of the tachi, except for the absence of choji-midare, which is nioi and utsuri. Gunomi-midare and suguha are found to have taken its place. In Nambokucho, the tanto were forged to be up to forty centimetres as opposed to the normal one shaku (about thirty centimetres) length. The tanto blades became thinner between the uri and the omote, and wider between the ha and mune. At this point in time, two styles of hamon were prevalent: the older style, which was subtle and artistic, and the newer, more popular style. Blades could be of exceptional quality. As the end of the period neared, the average blade narrowed and the sori became shallow. The aikuchi is a tanto koshirae where the fushi is flush with the mouth of the saya. There is no tsuba on this form of tanto.

Code: 20927Price: 2950.00 GBP


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View Probably The Worlds Largest Selection of Original Japanese Swords
Many many hundreds of original vintage and antique Japanese swords and edged weaponry from the past 1000 years. Currently for sale we have swords from 800 years old, and polearms and daggers, through all the subsequent centuries and eras, right up to the Meiji period of the 1870's. And likely the largest selection of WW2 Japanese officers swords bearing ancestral blades, also up to 500 years old. We further offer a selection of original Edo period fine Yoroi [armours] and kabuto [helmets]. As well as indivudual tsuba [sword guards] similarly up to 600 years old, fine maedate [helmet crests] and samurai accessories. We have had, and have, swords presented by past great shoguns to daimyo, from daimyo to high ranking samurai, and swords from old museums and great private collections, such as the world famous Pitt Rivers Collection. We specialise in samurai weaponry of great beauty, significant historical interest and merit.

Code: 20926Price: On Request

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