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Third Reich Iron Cross, 2nd Class. Makers Marked No. 24 Arbeitgemeinschaft Der Hanauer Plaksetten Hersteller, Hanau. 'Arnhem' Souvenir of An Ox & Bucks NCO

Third Reich Iron Cross, 2nd Class. Makers Marked No. 24 Arbeitgemeinschaft Der Hanauer Plaksetten Hersteller, Hanau. 'Arnhem' Souvenir of An Ox & Bucks NCO

RESERVED until Monday lunchtime .From the family of an NCO Corporal of The Ox and Bucks Regiment.
Third Reich Iron Cross, 2nd Class. Makers Marked No. 24 Arbeitgemeinschaft Der Hanauer Plaksetten Hersteller, Hanau. Nice untouched clean example.

We are selling his British campaign medals, corporal stripes and MKIII Camouflage helmet separately.

It is likely this 2nd Class Iron Cross medal was from a Panzer regiment combatant based at Arnham, as it is where he 'recovered' it during operation Market Garden, together with his Iron Cross 2nd Class, but there is no way of us to know now which combatant, either of the 9th or 10th SS.

The 1944 Arnhem airborne operation, immortalised by the film A Bridge Too Far, will forever be remembered as a great British feat of arms. British and Polish paratroopers displayed outstanding courage and tenacity in a desperate last stand situation. And yet, as this book describes, the plan was fatally flawed as the 9th and 10th SS Panzer Divisions were recuperating and concealed nearby. What followed was a bloody battle of attrition the result of which was arguably inevitable.

Drawing on rare and unpublished photographs, this Images of War series work reveals the historical combat record of the 'Hohenstaufen' and 'Frundsberg' divisions. It describes the intensity of the fighting in and around Arnhem between these elite SS and supporting units against a lightly armed yet equally determined enemy. Despite the war being only months away from its end and the defeat increasingly certain, the SS soldier remained fanatically motivated.

On 1 September 1939 Hitler reinstituted the Iron Cross (First time in 1813). The first class medal was for award to personnel who performed three to five acts of bravery in combat, and had already been awarded the Iron Cross second class. The cross has a three piece construction and a magnetic core. The cross is maker marked with number '24' made by Arbeitgemeinschaft Der Hanauer Plaksetten Hersteller, Hanau.
The cross has an excellent ribbon. The cross has an untouched darkened natural age patina giving it tremendous of character.

The Corporal of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Defence Platoon, survived and escaped capture during Operation Market Garden, to be evacuated from Arnham, and was photographed. See a photo of him and his evacuated comrades in the gallery.

**The price shown is for the Iron Cross 2nd class only, the 1st + 2nd Class medal,and the helmet and British medals etc are all for sale separately.
The corporals name will be past on to the next owner.  read more

Code: 25377

255.00 GBP

A Superb, Near Mint, Original, Cased Iron Cross Ist Class Medal Breast Award, Numbered 26, for, 'B.H. Mayer' from Pforzheim. In It's Original Maker Coded Box. Ox & Bucks L.I. Souvenir From Operation Market Garden

A Superb, Near Mint, Original, Cased Iron Cross Ist Class Medal Breast Award, Numbered 26, for, 'B.H. Mayer' from Pforzheim. In It's Original Maker Coded Box. Ox & Bucks L.I. Souvenir From Operation Market Garden

RESERVED until Monday lunchtime .
The reverse of the iron cross has B.H.Meyer's block barrel hinge with a flat fluted vertical pin marked ‘26’ for B.H. Mayer, Pforzheim, and flat wire catch. That hinge type Mayer often used for WW1 veterans {serving in WW2} for their 1st class Iron Crosses issued during WW2.

From the family of an NCO Corporal of The Ox and Bucks Regiment. We are selling his British campaign medals, corporal stripes and MKIII Camouflage helmet separately.

It is likely this cased 1st Class Iron Cross medal was from a Panzer regiment combatant based at Arnham, as it is where he 'recovered' it during operation Market Garden, together with his Iron Cross 2nd Class, but there is no way of us to know now which combatant, either of the 9th or 10th SS.

The 1944 Arnhem airborne operation, immortalised by the film A Bridge Too Far, will forever be remembered as a great British feat of arms. British and Polish paratroopers displayed outstanding courage and tenacity in a desperate last stand situation. And yet, as this book describes, the plan was fatally flawed as the 9th and 10th SS Panzer Divisions were recuperating and concealed nearby. What followed was a bloody battle of attrition the result of which was arguably inevitable.

Drawing on rare and unpublished photographs, this Images of War series work reveals the historical combat record of the 'Hohenstaufen' and 'Frundsberg' divisions. It describes the intensity of the fighting in and around Arnhem between these elite SS and supporting units against a lightly armed yet equally determined enemy. Despite the war being only months away from its end and the defeat increasingly certain, the SS soldier remained fanatically motivated.

Iron Cross 1st Class (Eisernes Kreuz 1. Klasse). On 1 September 1939 Hitler reinstituted the Iron Cross (First time in 1813). The first class medal was for award to personnel who performed three to five acts of bravery in combat, and had already been awarded the Iron Cross second class. The cross has a three piece construction and a magnetic core. The cross is maker marked with number '26' indicating production by the company of 'B.H. Mayer' from Pforzheim. The cross is having an excellent functional pin and catch. The cross is having an untouched darkened natural age patina giving it tremendous of character.

The Corporal of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Defence Platoon, survived and escaped capture during Operation Market Garden, to be evacuated from Arnham, and was photographed. See a photo of him and his evacuated comrades in the gallery.

**The price shown is for the Iron Cross 1st class in its original case only, the 2nd Class medal,and the helmet and British medals etc are all for sale separately.
The corporals name will be past on to the next owner.  read more

Code: 25376

545.00 GBP

Fabulous D-Day Collection, Medals, & Stripes, of An NCO Corporal of The Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, Part of the Airborne Div, Plus, An Original, Net Camouflaged, D.Day Pattern MK III 'High Rivet' Helmet. Iron Cross 1st Class in Case, Iron Cross 2nd Class

Fabulous D-Day Collection, Medals, & Stripes, of An NCO Corporal of The Ox & Bucks Light Infantry, Part of the Airborne Div, Plus, An Original, Net Camouflaged, D.Day Pattern MK III 'High Rivet' Helmet. Iron Cross 1st Class in Case, Iron Cross 2nd Class

The collection comprises group of his four British medals {unworn}, his German souvenirs of a near mint Iron Cross Ist Class in its original box, plus an Iron cross 2nd class, also near mint. Plus a D-Day Pattern MKIII high rivet helmet, with original netting and camouflaging, and his corporal's battledress stripes. The helmet may have painted regimental markings, but there is no way the net and camouflage should be removed in order to check. The German part of the collection is to be sold separately.

We do not know if he qualified for more than his four medals, as his family knew not either. His German souvenir medals were put away after the war and never saw the light of day till very recently, which is why they are in superb condition. The helmet was not his original service issue, but it has been put with his collection. The German medals {which may be from an Arnham based SS Panzer Division} will be sold separately, but only his medals, stripes and D-Day MKIII camouflage helmet are sold together here under this stock code.

The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry committed three battalions to the Normandy campaign in 1944, with two landing on the 6th June 1944 - one by air, one by sea.

2nd Battalion (52nd), Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 6th Airlanding Brigade, 6th Airborne Division

Part of 6th Airborne Division, 2nd Battalion were some of the first Allied troops to arrive in Normandy when six gliders carrying D Company and elements of B Company, led by Major John Howard, landed in the early hours of 6 June. Though one of the gliders landed some distance to the east, five would land remarkably close to their objective. They successfully captured and held the River Orne and Caen Canal bridges, securing a vital bridgehead to pave the way for the advance of the allied forces that would land on the beaches. One of these bridges was renamed Pegasus Bridge after the emblem of the British Airborne, the name it is still known by today. The rest of the Battalion would arrive by glider around 9pm on 6 June, landing at the bridgehead as part of Operation Mallard.

1st Buckinghamshire Battalion, Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, No. 6 Beach Group

The 1st Bucks Battalion, a territorial army battalion of the Ox & Bucks, also landed at Sword Beach on D-Day. Part of No. 6 Beach Group, an anti-tank platoon landed with the first tide, while the remainder landed with the second tide of the invasion force. The Group was responsible for organising units landing on Sword and arranging supply dumps in the area. As infantry support for the Beach Group, 1st Bucks were tasked with defending the beachhead from any counterattacks.
The Battle of Arnhem and the subsequent defence of the Oosterbeek Perimeter have passed into legend and the subject of numerous books and films, meaning that the story of the Operation is quite well known by most who have an interest in military history, what is probably less known is the contribution of the Regiment in Operation Market Garden.

Operation “Market Garden”
“Market” was the Airborne element of the operation, with three Allied Airborne Divisions being dropped behind enemy lines in Holland with the task of capturing and holding until relieved by ground forces, all the bridges along a “corridor” from the Belgian/Dutch border along a single road to the river Rhine at Arnhem.
The American 101st Airborne Division were to capture the bridges around Eindhoven, the American 82nd Airborne Division the bridges around Nijmegen and the British 1st Airborne Division along with the Polish Independent Parachute Brigade the bridges at Arnhem on the Rhine.

“Garden” was the land based element with the main thrust along the “corridor” being made by Lieutenant General Brian Horrocks’s British 30th Corps, with the 12th and 8th Corps on each flank. 30th Corps objective was to advance along the corridor linking up with the Airborne Divisions and reaching the Rhine at Arnhem within four days! From there the British 2nd Army could then cross the River Rhine, the last natural barrier, and then turn into the Ruhr and Germany itself and end the war by the end of 1944.

“This is a tale you will tell your grandchildren... …and mightily bored they’ll be”
Lieutenant General Brian Horrocks, commanding British 30th Corps
1st Battalion (43rd) Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Operations by the 53rd (Welsh) Division in 12th Corps, containing the 43rd, aimed to protect the left flank of the land based “Garden” force, 30th Corps, pushing through the airborne corridor from Eindhoven to link up with the Market forces at Arnhem.

On 20 September the enemy withdrew through De Kruisberg, leaving a small force to cover the retreat. The 43rd followed at night to push ahead in single file through the town to protect the flank of 15th (Scottish) Division forming a bridgehead on the Wilhelmina Canal at Best.

The advance by the 43rd in the direction of Oirschot attracted heavy fire. The blown bridge at Oirschot was reached at midday on 21st and the nearside bank of the canal was made secure to protect the western flank of the Scottish Division. The canal was a formidable obstacle but could be crossed by wading infantry.
The village of Dun was captured and where Regimental Headquarters was established until 5 October.

Nijmegen, Holland - October 1944
On 5 October, the 43rd was ordered to move up to Nijmegen bridgehead as reserve battalion. The move was full of small incidents of enemy action and manoeuvre. The Battalion led the attack by 71st Brigade to liberate 's-Hertogenbosch, which was secured by 27th, but the remnants of the enemy did not withdraw completely over the Maas to the north.
The objectives of the 1st British Airborne Division were to capture and hold the bridges over the river Rhine at Arnhem, however in the end only a force slightly over battalion strength managed to reach and hold the northern approaches to the Road Bridge. Only the Second Parachute Battalion (less C company, who were separated in the town), reinforced by part of 1st Parachute Brigade HQ, individual members of 1st and 3rd Parachute Battalions and some attached arms personnel actually reached the Divisional objective – the Bridge.

The Corporal of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry Defence Platoon, survived and escaped capture during Operation Market Garden, to be evacuated from Arnham, and was photographed. See a photo of him and his evacuated comrades in the gallery.

**The price shown is for the helmet, british campaign medals and stripes, it does not include the German medals, they are for sale separately.
The corporals name will be past on to the next owner.  read more

Code: 25378

1150.00 GBP

Household Cavalry Helmet and Cuirass of the Life Guards George VIth Era, Used For Her Late Well Beloved Majesty Queen Elizabeth IInd. It Has the Crown Badge Now Used By His Majesty King Charles IIIrd {The Crowned Badge of his Grandfather King George VIth}

Household Cavalry Helmet and Cuirass of the Life Guards George VIth Era, Used For Her Late Well Beloved Majesty Queen Elizabeth IInd. It Has the Crown Badge Now Used By His Majesty King Charles IIIrd {The Crowned Badge of his Grandfather King George VIth}

King George VIth WW2 period helmet, with cuirass . The full dress armour uniform helmet and armour of the Life Guards we also have a matching Life Guards red dress tunic with gilt bullion.

The Life Guards (LG) is the most senior regiment of the British Army and part of the Household Cavalry, along with The Blues and Royals.

The Life Guards grew from the four troops of Horse Guards (exclusively formed of gentlemen-troopers until the transformation of the last two remaining troops into Regiments of Life Guards in 1788) raised by Charles II around the time of his restoration, plus two troops of Horse Grenadier Guards (rank and file composed of commoners), which were raised some years later.
From 1812 to 1814, two squadrons from each of the Life Guard regiments served in the Peninsular War. In 1815 they were part of The Household Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo under Major-General Lord Edward Somerset. This would be their last active service for more than 60 years, during which time they performed ceremonial and public order duties in London.
Elements of the Life Guards, along with the Royal Horse Guards, formed the Household Cavalry Composite Regiment (HCCR) for active service. The HCCR was in action in the Anglo-Egyptian War of 1882 and the Second Boer War of 1899 to 1902. THe HCCR was mobilised again in 1914 at the start of the First World War, where they formed part of the British Expeditionary Force and fought in most of the major battles on the Western Front.8

In 1918, the two Life Guards regiments gave up their horses and were re-roled as machine gun battalions, becoming the 1st and 2nd Battalions, Guards Machine Gun Regiment. They reverted to their previous names and roles after the end of the war. In 1922, the two regiments were merged into one regiment, The Life Guards (1st and 2nd). In 1928, it was re-designated The Life Guards.

During the Second World War, again forming part of the HCCR, the Life Guards undertook armoured reconnaissance duties in Palestine, Iraq, Iran, Egypt and Italy. In 1944, the Life Guards took part in the Normandy landings and the advance through France to liberate Brussels. In the late 1940s, they were deployed to the Middle East, initially in Egypt, garrisoned at Kasr-el-Nil Barracks in Cairo from 1946 to 1947, and then in Palestine from 1947. In 1948, the unit left the Middle East and returned to England on leave. In 1952, it returned to Germany as part of the 11th Armoured Division.

The Household Cavalry are the only British regiments dressed as cuirassiers and has worn them since the coronation of William IV in 1830. The cuirass consists of a front and back polished steel plate shaped to fit the body. It had brass edges and studs on the sides and was secured on the shoulders by two gilt scales of regimental pattern. At the waist it is secured by a thin buff hide leather belt. The cuirass is lined with leather, The cuirass is only worn in mounted review order with the white leather panteloons and jack boots.

The Household Cavalry Regiment, The Life Guards (right) and The Blues and Royals (left) forming part of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth's funeral procession (Picture: MOD).

By PRA - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6654357  read more

Code: 25333

SOLD

A Large Original Duraluminum Zeppelin Aeronautical Alloy Embossed Bowl

A Large Original Duraluminum Zeppelin Aeronautical Alloy Embossed Bowl

It is on of the largest pieces of it kind we have ever seen, and a stunning example of the earliest forms of aeronautical object d’art.

It is made from Duraluminum, a very expensive and seldom-used white metal alloy, except for the construction of Zeppelins. Incredibly strong yet light, and not vulnerable to dangerous corrosion. The perfect material for the construction of airships in the earliest days of the aeronautics.

Often when a Zeppelin crashed in the early days, the framework was recycled and used to create such amazing pieces, embossed with the symbols of the vessels from which they were made, such as this, and eagerly acquired by the highly patriotic German people.

This bowl measures 9.25" x 11." It sports a likeness of Graf von Zeppelin and an early zeppelin in the sky. We have seen cups and bowls of this nature before, but this is the largest one we have ever seen.  read more

Code: 22682

575.00 GBP

Most Rare 1920's Artefacts, of Houdini's Great Friend, of Early 20th Century Stage Magicians. The Magician's Club of London, Founded by Harry Houdini, Gold Medal Mounted Badge, & A Magic Circle Gold Medal

Most Rare 1920's Artefacts, of Houdini's Great Friend, of Early 20th Century Stage Magicians. The Magician's Club of London, Founded by Harry Houdini, Gold Medal Mounted Badge, & A Magic Circle Gold Medal

Rare and highly interesting items of early Magicians Clubs, and both directly connected to the great and legendary, Harry Houdini. Both finest pure gilt and enamel, and from the 1920's, each with blue water silk ribbon mount. Magician’s Club medal, together with a Member of the Magic Circle medal, in pure gilt and finest blue enamel, of Wilfred Allan, and Houdini's great friend Douglas Dexter's principle pupil. The Magicians' Club of London was formed in 1911 by Harry Houdini along with others including Servais Le Roy, Chris Van Bern, Carl Stakemann, and Stanley Collins.
It was a concept of Will Goldston who had taken umbrage with The Magic Circle (founded in 1905) and decided to start his own society. He wrote an article titled "The League of Magicians - A Suggestion by Will Goldston" in his Magician Annual for 1910-11.
The first meeting was officially reported in Goldston's Magician Monthly.
Houdini was elected president, the rest as Vice-Presidents with Stanley Collins as Secretary and Will Goldston as Treasurer. Nearly a hundred members were enrolled at the inaugural meeting on May 27, 1911. Houdini remained president until his death.

After the death of Houdini in 1926, Will Goldston was unanimously elected to succeed him. He held this office for the next three years, relinquishing it to Louis Gautier in 1929, but continuing to serve as Treasurer

The club seemed to have disbanded some time after Will Goldton passed away in 1948. In Goodliffe's Abracadabra magazine July 1949, inquiries were made regarding the Magicians' Club, London, since the death of Will Goldston asking if it had died a natural death along with its founder. As far as they were able to ascertain, it had. Wilfred Allan was the principle pupil of magician, and dear friend of co member Harry Houdini, Douglas Dexter. Douglas Dexter was once summoned to the Royal Palace for a personal Command Performance for the King, died in 1938 and Wilfred Allan died a year later in 1939.  read more

Code: 22437

695.00 GBP

A Super WW2 Luftwaffe Bomber Radio, Morse Tapper and Earphones. Deutche Telefonwerk und Kabelindustrie ag Berlin Likely From A Heinkel He 111

A Super WW2 Luftwaffe Bomber Radio, Morse Tapper and Earphones. Deutche Telefonwerk und Kabelindustrie ag Berlin Likely From A Heinkel He 111

A most rare Luftwaffe bomber radio element prufgerat PG10, with earphones, throat-mike and morse tapper. All original Luftwaffe issue and possibly removed from a crashed bomber. Serial number plate shows it was manufactured by Deutche Telefonwerk und Kabelindustrie ag Berlin, WW2 German code number 'bxo'. According to its 24 page manual it was issued with a splash-proof case, one might assume in case the plane crashed at sea and the radio was salvageable.

As may be used in the Heinkel He 111, and it probably was removed from such an aircraft. It was a German aircraft designed by Siegfried and Walter G?nter at Heinkel Flugzeugwerke in 1934. Through development it was described as a "wolf in sheep's clothing". Due to restrictions placed on Germany after the First World War prohibiting bombers, it masqueraded as a civil airliner, although from conception the design was intended to provide the nascent Luftwaffe with a fast medium bomber.

Perhaps the best-recognised German bomber due to the distinctive, extensively glazed "greenhouse" nose of later versions, the Heinkel He 111 was the most numerous Luftwaffe bomber during the early stages of World War II. The bomber fared well until the Battle of Britain, when its weak defensive armament was exposed. Nevertheless, it proved capable of sustaining heavy damage and remaining airborne. As the war progressed, the He 111 was used in a variety of roles on every front in the European theatre. It was used as a strategic bomber during the Battle of Britain, a torpedo bomber in the Atlantic and Arctic, and a medium bomber and a transport aircraft on the Western, Eastern, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and North African Front theatres. Top right guage lacking.  read more

Code: 21642

995.00 GBP

Simply Superb Hand Painted Portrait Miniature of a Winston Churchill’s  ‘Harpoon Force’ Irish Guards Officer, 2nd Lieut. Gipps Romer, 2nd Batt. Irish Guards. The Heroic Rescuers of The Royal Dutch Family May 1940, And The Rear Guard Battle of Boulogne

Simply Superb Hand Painted Portrait Miniature of a Winston Churchill’s ‘Harpoon Force’ Irish Guards Officer, 2nd Lieut. Gipps Romer, 2nd Batt. Irish Guards. The Heroic Rescuers of The Royal Dutch Family May 1940, And The Rear Guard Battle of Boulogne

A 2nd Battalion Irish Guards officer of ‘Harpoon Force’, and the heroic Dunkirk evacuation rear guard action at Boulogne, which was a ‘special section’ personally created by Churchill, the day Winston Churchill became Prime Minister.
Their first task was to rescue of the Dutch Royal Family and Government from the Hook of Holland and the second resulted in the incredible rear guard Battle of Boulogne. Effectively, it was Winston’s very first military special executive version of his later brainchild, the Commandos. A form of the British commando force before the commandos even existed. We had the privilege to own for a brief while the actual autographed book by Robert Graves, personally given to Churchill by Graves, {that he read in his bath during the war}, about a British Officer’s combat against the American sniper riflemen in the American Revolution, that inspired his decision how to create the British Commandos. That book now resides in a museum in Florida.

An original, stunning, WW2 Irish Guards miniature portrait. Of an officer of one of the great and famous regiments of the British Army. It was while serving in the Irish Guards that John Kipling, son of one of England's greatest poets and novelists, Rudyard Kipling, was declared missing, presumed killed, at Loos 1915.

A miniature portrait of 2nd Lieut. Gipps Romer, 2nd Batallion Irish Guards painted just prior to WW2, who died during his service in the early part of the war, August 1940.

His combat service included the protection of the Netherlands Royal Family in their evacuation in Holland, and his combat service was also noted by Colonel Hayden, commander of Harpoon Force, as being commendable at the rear guard action at Boulogne, to defend the withdrawal of the BEF and French Army from Dunkirk.

It is a fine small miniature, painted with stunning detail and a wonderfully fresh and vibrant colour. In a square gilt frame, with dart edging and plush velvet rear cover. Domed glass front.
The Irish Guards were formed on 1st April 1900 by order of HRH Queen Victoria to commemorate the bravery of the Irish people who fought in the Boer war. The Irish Guards played a major part in both World Wars, winning a total of six Victoria Crosses including the last to be presented in the Second World War and have seen armed conflict in many parts of the world since 1945.

During the Second World War, the regiment fought in Norway, France, North Africa, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands and Germany. The regiment first saw combat during the Norwegian Campaign. Following a challenging sea voyage to Norway, the 1st Battalion arrived in May 1940 and fought for two days at the town of Pothus before they were forced to retreat. The Irish Guards conducted a fighting withdrawal and served as the Allied rearguard.

The Battalion was evacuated along with the rest of the expeditionary force in June. While the 1st Battalion was fighting in Norway, the 2nd Battalion was deployed to the Hook of Holland to cover the evacuation of the Dutch Royal Family and Government in May 1940. The 2nd Battalion was then deployed to France and ordered to defend the port of Boulogne. The guardsmen held out against overwhelming odds for three days, buying valuable time for the Dunkirk Evacuation, before they were evacuated themselves. The Irish Guards (IG), part of the Guards Division, is one of the Foot Guards regiments of the British Army and, together with the Royal Irish Regiment, it is one of the two Irish infantry regiments in the British Army. The regiment has participated in campaigns in the First World War, the Second World War, the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan as well as numerous other operations throughout its history. The Irish Guards claim six Victoria Cross recipients, four from the First World War and two from the Second World War. 1940: George Gipps Romer, known as 'Gipps' was involved in the evacuation in 1940. According to the history of the Irish Guards in Celtopedia:

"In May 1940, the 2nd Irish Guards deployed to the Hook of Holland to cover the evacuation of the Dutch Royal Family. The battalion evacuated the day after the Government and Dutch Royal Family had been evacuated. They had only a short respite upon their returned to the UK for just a few days later they returned, along with the Welsh Guards, to the continent, to Boulogne, a port in northern France, reaching the town on 22 May.

Their orders were to defend part of Boulogne during the epic evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) from the overwhelming and inexorable advance of the Germans. The Guards stoutly defended their area of responsibility from better equipped German forces, repulsing a number of German attacks on the 22nd, but on the morning of the 23rd, superior Germany forces attacked the battalion and the Guards suffered very heavily in the attack. Later that day the battalion was evacuated from Boulogne, they were the last to leave, and fought valiantly while waiting to be evacuated." He was a "First reinforcement for the Harpoon Force under the command of Colonel Haydon.

"Colonel Haydon now determined to reorganize the whole position. Captain McCausland collected all his remaining men and at nine o’clock withdrew No. 1 Company to the centre of Outreau village, where they defended the road down into Boulogne. At the same time, Captain Murphy withdrew his remaining platoons to cover the area between No.. 1 and No. 2 Companies. No. 3 Company, under Captain Finlay, remained where it was, as yet untouched. Thus the line now ran from the centre of Outreau through some fields, which gave a field of fire of some 150 yards, on to the northern exits of Outreau, and thence to the sea. Though shorter than the original line, it was still too long and too thinly held to withstand a concentrated attack on any one point. Colonel Haydon sent Major Ross, his second-in-command, back to find some inner line of defence that could be held with only three companies, leaving one in reserve. ‘At this stage,’ he said, ‘I did not yet realize that No. 1 and 4 Companies had already been reduced to almost microscopic numbers.’ Of the 107 men of No. 4 Company who landed in Boulogne, only nineteen returned and only forty of No. 1 Company. Most of these casualties they had lost already, so the Battalion now had only two and a half rifle companies left.

A light railway runs through the middle of Boulogne, curving round behind the Battalion’s present position. At half-past ten the Companies began withdrawing to the line of this railway, from which they could defend the west of the town and the main road from the south. The remnants of No. 1 Company held the village till the rest of the Battalion was established in the houses and gardens along the railway. They and the Germans were within fifty yards of each other. For two hours the Company beat off every attempt to outflank or rush them. ‘The holding of this post by No. 1 Company,’ said Colonel Haydon, ‘in spite of the very heavy losses it had suffered, reflects the very highest credit on Captain C. R. McCausland, 2/Lieutenant G. G. Romer and the other ranks who held the post.’
80mm x 67mm in frame

link to;

THE RESCUE OF THE DUTCH ROYAL FAMILY
BY THE IRISH AND WELSH GUARDS
By Captain P.R.J.TILLEY
Former Welsh Guards
(Permission given to Krista Salter to publish article)

copy and paste

https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/21/a4678121.shtml  read more

Code: 23087

995.00 GBP

German Solid Silver Medal {900 fine} Commemorating The William Randolph Hearst Sponsored, American Flight, of the World’s First Round the World Passenger Flight, of the

German Solid Silver Medal {900 fine} Commemorating The William Randolph Hearst Sponsored, American Flight, of the World’s First Round the World Passenger Flight, of the "Graf Zeppelin" Airship In August 1929.

Medal commemorating round the world flight of the "Graf Zeppelin" airship, with portraits of Zeppelin and Eckener, silver, diameter 36mm, depth 3mm, German, 1929. Rim legend: Preuss. Staatsmunze. Silber 900 Fein. Obverse: legend, Weltfahrt August 1929. L.Z.127; exergue scene, airship above ocean. Reverse: Graf Zeppelin. Dr Hugo Eckener. 1898-1928. exergue, double portrait bust profiles to left
The airship LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin is considered the most successful commercial airship of its time and marked the pinnacle of airship travel. On August 15, 1929, it started under the leadership of Dr. Hugo Eckener in Friedrichshafen on Lake Constance on the most spectacular demonstration flight in aviation history at the time:

Graf Zeppelin Round-the-World Flight (“Weltfahrt”)

In 1929, Graf Zeppelin made perhaps its most famous flight; a round-the-world voyage covering 21,2500 miles in five legs from Lakehurst to Friedrichshafen, Friedrichshafen to Tokyo, Tokyo to Los Angeles, Los Angeles to Lakehurst, and then Lakehurt to Friedrichshafen again.

It was the first passenger-carrying flight around the world and received massive coverage in the world’s press.

The flight was partly sponsored by American newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, who paid for about half the cost of the flight in return for exclusive media rights in the United States and Britain.
Hearst had insisted that the flight begin and end in America, while the Germans naturally thought the Round-the-World flight of a German ship should begin and end in Germany. As a compromise, there were two official flights; the “American” flight began and ended at Lakehurst, while the “German” flight began and ended at Friedrichshafen.

The Round-the-World flight carried 60 men and one woman, Hearst newspaper reporter Lady Grace Hay-Drummond-Hay, whose presence and reporting greatly increased the public’s interest in the journey. Other passengers included journalists from several countries, American naval officers Charles Rosendahl and Jack C. Richardson, polar explorer and pilot Sir Hubert Wilkins, young American millionaire Bill Leeds, and representatives of Japan and the Soviet Union. All of those that took part received one of these solid silver medals.

Graf Zeppelin left Friedrichshafen on July 27, 1929 and crossed the Atlantic to Lakehurst, New Jersey, and the “American” flight began on August 7, 1929 with an eastbound crossing back to Germany.

The successful journey took just under 5 weeks with stopovers in Tokyo, Los Angeles and Lakehurst (New York).  read more

Code: 24154

240.00 GBP

A Superb Pre WW2 Nazi SS Fire Protection Police Sidearm & Original Frog. Used From 1933 till 1945 By The SS. Feuerschutzpolizei.

A Superb Pre WW2 Nazi SS Fire Protection Police Sidearm & Original Frog. Used From 1933 till 1945 By The SS. Feuerschutzpolizei.

Originally manufactured circa 1933. Used by the Fire Protection Police under the control of the SS. With original leather frog. Plated blade, plated hilt with checquered celluloid grip. Double 'S' quillon guard.

An organization that was an auxiliary to the Ordnungspolizei, and during the war was absorbed into the SS. Feuerschutzpolizei. By 1938, all of Germany's local fire brigades were part of the ORPO. Orpo Hauptamt had control of all civilian fire brigades. ORPO's chief was SS-Oberstgruppenfuhrer Kurt Daluege who was responsible to Himmler alone until 1943 when Daluege had a massive heart attack. From 1943, Daluege was replaced by Obergruppenfuhrer Alfred Wunnenberg until May 1945.

ORPO was structurally reorganised by 1941. It had been divided into the numerous offices covering every aspect of German law enforcement in accordance with Himmler's desire for public control of all things. Small lateral crack in both quillon.  read more

Code: 24018

250.00 GBP