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Museum Grade Koto Era Samurai Wakazashi Sword B y Master Tadamitsu Circa 1440-1460 Mini Goto Koshirae, With Deep Red Lacquer Saya & Black Silk Binding

With its spectacular suite of beautiful original Edo Mino Goto fittings with tsuba, in shakudo, and pure gold decor of flowers, cricket, catydid and preying mantis. Deep red ishime stone finish lacquer saya, with carved buffalo horn fittings and Mino Goto throat mount. Superb black silk tsuka-ito over fine pure gold decorated menuki. A wonderful Muromachi era blade almost 600 years old, with a superb hamon, in around 95% polish, with gold foil habaki and blade smith shortened tang with its original preserved ‘folded over’ signature inlaid and inserted within the tang. The hamon forms a delightful gunome pattern, mixing with clove (Choji) outline which is slanted generally. The founder of the sword maker school, Tadamitsu in Bizen, is referred in the Shouou period (1288-93) and the oldest existent Tanto by him has the date year, Teiji 3,1364) during the Nanbokucho period, then later generations shows the records of Ouei to Bunmei era (1394-1486) in Muromachi period. The preserved 'folded over' system, that can be seen beautifully done on this blade, in order to preserve the blade smith's signature, was only reserved for the best and most highly revered blades, often of historical significance to the samurai's family. The ancient province of Kibi (of which Bizen was the easternmost region; now Okayama prefecture) possessed excellent ironmaking technology, which helped make Kibi into a powerful state. The region is blessed with all the vital ingredients needed for Japanese sword making: iron sand, water, and charcoal of Japanese red pine, which has excellent thermal efficiency. Research on Japanese swords since the Meiji period has revealed five different features or styles based on the regions in which they were made: Yamashiro (Kyoto prefecture), Yamato (Nara prefecture), Bizen (Okayama prefecture), Sagami (Kanagawa prefecture), and Mino (Gifu prefecture. The characteristic styles of these five regions were passed down from master to disciple and from one region to the next. These are collectively known as Gokaden (five traditions of swordmaking). The province of Bizen was located far from Japan's political center throughout its history, allowing it to prosper regardless of the political state of sovereignty of the day. The most typical Bizen blade has a steel surface grain called itamehada (wooden board grained) with a unique pattern called chōji (clove-shaped) on the blade. This pattern is a feature of Bizen swords and it is what makes Bizen swords special. The Gotō School of sword-fittings makers was founded in the fifteenth century by Gotō Yūjō, who is said to have been patronized by the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa (1435–1490). The work of the Gotō masters is characterized by painterly designs carved in high relief on a ground of shakudō (an alloy of copper and gold chemically treated to turn a rich blue-black), finished in nanako (tiny circles punched regularly over the surface to give it a granular appearance) with colorful accents in gold and silver. The succeeding generations of Gotō masters continued to work in these soft metals and concentrated on the smaller sword fittings, such as kozuka (the handle of the small utility knife fitted into a slot on the back of a sword scabbard), kōgai (a skewer-like hairdressing tool carried in the front of the scabbard), and menuki (a pair of grip ornaments secured by the handle wrappings). The production of the stouter sword guards, or tsuba, was left to other masters. While earlier generations had not signed their work, the Gotō masters in about 1600 began to authenticate the work of their predecessors; the attributions usually were engraved on the backs of the pieces themselves. These attributions bear testimony to the keen interest in early sword fittings as status symbols for high-ranking samurai. Overall blade length from base of habaki to tip 21.5 inches long

Code: 23519

Reserved


A Delightful & Beautiful Most Ancient Samurai ‘Golden Dragon’ Tachi Around 600 Years Old

See it displayed on the tachi-kake, [code 23511] an ancient tachi mounted in the Edo period on a theme of gold, gold nishiji lacquer saya, gold fittings and tsuba and pale gold tsuka-Ito bound of dragon menuki. Blade made In around 1390 to 1420, and this is a most beautiful and ancient sword from the great warring period of Japan's samurai history. In the gallery we show an early samurai print of the presentation of a similar fine tachi by a daimyo lord to his favoured samurai [for illustration purposes]. The mounts are original Edo period, with lovely nishiji [ground gold] lacquer on the saya and traditional tachi mountings in shinchu, and gold silk ito wrapped over pure gold overlaid, carved kinko dragon, holding the ancient ken, the straight ancient Buddhist samurai sword. The tsuba is a tradional tachi form in three pieces , dai seppa in shinchu and the central plate in iron. A blade of most impressive, elegant and deep curvature, typical of the early samurai sword of the Nambokochu to Muromachi era [1333 to 1573]. As is often with ancient swords the story of it's use starts in the era before it was actually made, by it's master smith, maybe a decade earlier in the Nanboku-cho period (Northern and Southern Courts period) Spanning from 1336 to 1392, it was a period that occurred during the formative years of the Muromachi
bakufu of Japan's history.
The Imperial seats during the Nanboku-cho period were in relatively close proximity, but
geographically distinct. They were conventionally identified as:
Northern capital : Kyoto
Southern capital : Yoshino.
During this period, there existed a Northern Imperial Court, established by Ashikaga Takauji in Kyoto, and a Southern Imperial Court, established by Emperor Go-Daigo in Yoshino.
Ideologically, the two courts fought for fifty years, with the South giving up to the North in 1392.
However, in reality the Northern line was under the power of the Ashikaga shoguns and had little real independence. This sword would very likely have been used in the Onin War (1467-1477) which led to serious political fragmentation and obliteration of domains: a great struggle for land and power ensued among bushi chieftains and lasted until the mid-sixteenth century. Peasants rose against their landlords and samurai against their overlords, as central control virtually disappeared. An early Japanese print in the gallery shows a samurai receiving his reward of a fine tachi [such as this one] from his shugo daimyo lord. The shugo daimyo were the first group of men to hold the title "daimyo". They arose from among the shugo during the Muromachi period. The shugo daimyo held not only military and police powers, but also economic power within a province. They accumulated these powers throughout the first decades of the Muromachi period.
Major shugo daimyo came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ouchi, and Akamatsu. The greatest ruled multiple provinces.

The Ashikaga shogunate required the shugo daimyo to reside in Kyoto, so they appointed relatives or retainers, called shugodai, to represent them in their home provinces. Eventually some of these in turn came to reside in Kyoto, appointing deputies in the provinces.

The Onin War was a major uprising in which shugo daimyo fought each other. During this and other wars of the time, kuni ikki, or provincial uprisings, took place as locally powerful warriors sought independence from the shugo daimyo. The deputies of the shugo daimyo, living in the provinces, seized the opportunity to strengthen their position. At the end of the fifteenth century, those shugo daimyo who succeeded remained in power. Those who had failed to exert control over their deputies fell from power and were replaced by a new class, the "sengoku daimyo", who arose from the ranks of the shugodai'K and Ji-samurai. Osuriage tang unsigned, nishiji lacquer on the saya with small surface age chips, as to be expected. Blade 63cm long tsuba to tip. 40 inches long approx overall in saya

Code: 22660

6750.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Stunning & Beautiful Edo Period Tachi-kake, Japanese Samurai Sword Stand Okuyama Family, Descendants of the Famous Genji Clan

Finest black urushi Japanese lacquerwork, over carved wood, bearing numerous hiramaki-e gold clan "four eyes" Hakkoryu kamon throughout. Constructed in two main pieces, that slot together for assembly, and apart, for storage and transportation in the samurai baggage train. Shown holding our 600 year old ‘golden dragon’ tachi [code number 22660] The Hakkoryu’s Yotsume-no-mon of the Okuyama clan who are descendants of the famous Genji clan (also called Minamoto). The clan was popularized in a famous Heian period romance Genji Monogatari, written by Murasaki Shikibu.

Most prominent of the Genji clan was Minamoto Yoritomo, a renowned general during the Kamakura period. During this era, the two most powerful clans were the Genji and their enemies, the Taira (also Heiko). The Taira were defeated in a fierce sea battle during the Genpei war and Minamoto Yoritomo and his descendants reigned supreme in Japan for some time.

The type of mon (crest) used in Hakkoryu was used by a retainer of the Minamoto clan and is commonly known as Meyui, after the concept of tie-dying. The particular style of the Hakkoryu mon is commonly known as Yotsume (“four eyes”). The significance of the crest is related primarily to the ancestors of the Okuyama family. However, the geometric design of eight squares related directly to the number eight of Hakkoryu* and the four eyes denotes preparedness for attack from all directions. There is also a superstition attached to Yotsume, as the “four eyes” guard against evil. This idea has been extended to include personal protection as in the case of Hakkoryu. The tachikake sword stand displayed the sword in a standing upright position, as opposed to the katanakake horizontal position. The vertical meant only one sword could be held, the horizontal two or several. The vertical tachikake makes a more impressive centrepiece display today, but when originally made if stood on the floor immediately next to the samurai's bed roll, the sword could be grabbed in an instant by a recumbant sleeping samurai if alerted to imminent danger. The Edo period (1603–1868) saw an increase in the focused cultivation of lacquer trees for urushi, and the development of the techniques used. In the 18th century coloured lacquers came into wider use. With the development of economy and culture, and the artistic quality of lacquered furniture improved. Hon'ami Kōetsu and Ogata Kōrin brought the designs of the Rinpa school of painting into lacquerware. After the middle of the Edo period, Inro [box containers worn from the samuria's obi hung by cords] became popular as men's accessories, and wealthy merchants of the chōnin class and samurai class collected inro of the highest aesthetic value, most precisely designed with urushi lacquer. Marie Antoinette and Maria Theresa were known collectors of fine Japanese lacquerware and their collections are exhibited in the Louvre and the Palace of Versailles. During this period, due to the development of the economy, shishiai-togidashi maki-e, an advanced technique, became popular. Small areas of natural age wear markings.

Code: 23511

3450.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Beautiful Late Edo Bakumatsu Copper Katana Tsuba With NBTHK Papers.

Bakumatsu copper tsuba, NBTHK Kicho Kodugu papers from 2020. With a translation, the "ninteisho" is introducing the document as recognition written in calligraphy. The tsuba is decorated with Aki kusa, Autumn grass [flowers], unsigned. The Nihon Bijutsu Tōken Hozon Kyōkai is a public interest incorporated foundation established in February 1948 to preserve and promote Japanese swords that have artistic value. Tsuba are usually finely decorated, and are highly desirable collectors' items in their own right. Tsuba were made by whole dynasties of craftsmen whose only craft was making tsuba. They were usually lavishly decorated. In addition to being collectors items, they were often used as heirlooms, passed from one generation to the next. Japanese families with samurai roots sometimes have their family crest (mon) crafted onto a tsuba. Tsuba can be found in a variety of metals and alloys, including iron, steel, brass, copper and shakudo. In a duel, two participants may lock their katana together at the point of the tsuba and push, trying to gain a better position from which to strike the other down. This is known as tsubazeriai pushing tsuba against each other. The tsuba has north and south kuchi-beni.
Literally "lipstick", but refers to the copper plugs of the nakago-ana. Their function is to secure the tsuba firmly when mounted on a blade. These plugs are sometimes called sekigane.

Code: 23510

695.00 GBP


Shortlist item
SOLD A Superb Koto Battle Katana Signed Kashu ju Fujiwara Ietsugu,1550

Kashu ju fujiwara Ietsugu school, a school of swordsmiths that were most highly prized by all samurai and known for the source of superbly effective and reliable swords for battle. Finely mounted, in shibui battle-sword form, in fully matching koshirae sword mounts and signed tsuba based around a water buffalo, partially supine, beneath a crescent moon and clouds. The fushi has a water buffalo supine beneath clouds, fushi has a silver crescent moon partially covered in silver clouds with engraved clouds, the signed tsuba has another water buffalo. The menuki under the wrap are dragons. The blade has a supern hamon. The original Edo period lacquer saya is of super quality despite its shibui quietness. Kaga - Hashizume Kunitsugu School. Ietsuga started in the Kyoroku era (1528-1532) and was ending in the Koji era (1555-1558). Ietsugu and his descendants are called Hashizume school as they lived in Hashizume town in Kaga province. Also they had been prized by warriors from long ago for the name of smith Ietsugu that means "Inheritance of a House" and also has been called as "Kaga-aoe" because they adopted the name of Ietsugu that originated from the Ietsugu in Aoe school. The combination of the buffalo horns and crescent moon can be reflected on samurai armour kabuto [helmets], such as was said to have been worn by Yamamoto Kansuke who was a noted samurai of the 16th century who was one of Takeda Shingen’s most trusted Twenty-Four Generals. Also known by his formal name, Haruyuki. He was a brilliant strategist, and is particularly known for his plan which led to victory in the fourth battle of Kawanakajima against Uesugi Kenshin. However, Kansuke never lived to see his plan succeed; thinking it to have failed, he charged headlong into the enemy ranks, dying in battle. In the book of Japanese folklore "Strange Tales of the Crescent Moon" The princess Neiwanjo rides upon a water buffalo as she approaches Chinzei Hachiro Tametomo Tametomo on the Okinawan shore. Tametomo is the famous seven feet tall giant samurai, a celebrated archer whose bow was more than eight feet long and required the strength of three ordinary men to bend it. He could shoot arrows, their heads as large as spears, with such force that they could sink an enemy ship. Said to have chased away the god of smallpox, A Superb Koto Battle Katana Signed Kashu ju Fujiwara Ietsugu, Circa 1550

Kashu ju fujiwara Ietsugu school, a school of swordsmiths that were most highly prized by all samurai and known for the source of superbly effective and reliable swords for battle. Finely mounted, in shibui battle-sword form, in fully matching Edo koshirae sword mounts and signed tsuba based around a water buffalo, partially supine, beneath a crescent moon and clouds. The fushi has a water buffalo supine beneath clouds, fushi has a silver crescent moon partially covered in silver clouds with engraved clouds, the signed tsuba has another water buffalo. The menuki under the original Edo period silk binding wrap are dragons [silk binding shows natural age wear]. The blade has a superb and beautiful hamon much activity. The original Edo period lacquer saya is of super quality despite its shibui quietness with small natural age markings. Kaga - Hashizume Kunitsugu School. Ietsuga started in the Kyoroku era (1528-1532) and was ending in the Koji era (1555-1558). Ietsugu and his descendants are called Hashizume school as they lived in Hashizume town in Kaga province. Also they had been prized by warriors from long ago for the name of smith Ietsugu that means "Inheritance of a House" and also has been called as "Kaga-aoe" because they adopted the name of Ietsugu that originated from the Ietsugu in Aoe school. The combination of the buffalo horns and crescent moon can be reflected on samurai armour kabuto [helmets], such as was said to have been worn by Yamamoto Kansuke who was a noted samurai of the 16th century who was one of Takeda Shingen’s most trusted Twenty-Four Generals. Also known by his formal name, Haruyuki. He was a brilliant strategist, and is particularly known for his plan which led to victory in the fourth battle of Kawanakajima against Uesugi Kenshin. However, Kansuke never lived to see his plan succeed; thinking it to have failed, he charged headlong into the enemy ranks, dying in battle. In the book of Japanese folklore "Strange Tales of the Crescent Moon" The princess Neiwanjo rides upon a water buffalo as she approaches Chinzei Hachiro Tametomo Tametomo on the Okinawan shore. Tametomo is the famous seven feet tall giant samurai, a celebrated archer whose bow was more than eight feet long and required the strength of three ordinary men to bend it. He could shoot arrows, their heads as large as spears, with such force that they could sink an enemy ship. Said to have chased away the god of smallpox. During its working lifetime it would have seen service with a samurai in the 16th century since the time of Oda Nubunaga, right through the Shogunate till the 1860’s, and used in combat by between 20 to 30 samurai over the centuries.

Code: 20841

Price
on
Request


A Japanese Edo Period Armour Sleeve And Gauntlet

In Japanese called the kote and tekko. A single one piece Kote, armoured glove like sleeve which extends to the shoulder, then down to the kusari lined han kote, which covers the forearm and hand. Ideal for framing for a unique interior decor display or as an original piece of original samurai warfare history. Kote were made from cloth covered with iron plates of various size and shape, connected by chain armour (kusari). Japanese armour is thought to have evolved from the armour used in ancient China. Cuirasses and helmets were manufactured in Japan as early as the 4th century.Tanko, worn by foot soldiers and keiko, worn by horsemen were both pre-samurai types of early Japanese cuirass constructed from iron plates connected together by leather thongs.

During the Heian period (794-1185), the Japanese cuirass evolved into the more familiar style of armour worn by the samurai known as the dou or do. Japanese armour makers started to use leather (nerigawa) and lacquer was used to weather proof the armour parts. By the end of the Heian period the Japanese cuirass had arrived at the shape recognized as being distinctly samurai. Leather and or iron scales were used to construct samurai armours, with leather and eventually silk lace used to connect the individual scales (kozane) which these cuirasses were now being made from.

In the 16th century Japan began trading with Europe during what would become known as the Nanban trade. Samurai acquired European armour including the cuirass and comb morion which they modified and combined with domestic armour as it provided better protection from the newly introduced matchlock muskets known as Tanegashima. The introduction of the tanegashima by the Portuguese in 1543 changed the nature of warfare in Japan causing the Japanese armour makers to change the design of their armours from the centuries old lamellar armours to plate armour constructed from iron and steel plates which was called tosei gusoku (new armours). Bullet resistant armours were developed called tameshi gusoku or (bullet tested) allowing samurai to continue wearing their armour despite the use of firearms.

The era of warfare called the Sengoku period ended around 1600, Japan was united and entered the so-called peaceful Edo period, but conflict remained through internecine and clan rivalry. Samurai continued to use both plate and lamellar armour as a symbol of their status and for extreme combat. During the Edo period light weight, portable and secret hidden armours became popular as there was still a need for personal protection. Civil strife, duels, assassinations, peasant revolts required the use of armours such as the kusari katabira (chain armour jacket) and armoured sleeves as well as other types of armour which could be worn under ordinary clothing. Edo period samurai were in charge of internal security and would wear various types of kusari gusoku (chain armour) and shin and arm protection as well as forehead protectors (hachi-gane).

Armour continued to be worn and used in Japan until the end of the samurai era (Meiji period) in the 1860s, with the last use of samurai armour happening in 1877 during the Satsuma Rebellion. Shown in the photograph with a thin Japanese cotton cord around the wrist for illustration purposes only, to show how it would fit on the arm at the wrist [cord not present]

Code: 18491

345.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Early, Koto Period Ko Katchushi Iron Sukashi Mon Katana Tsuba Sword Guard

Uchigatana tsuba are known as Ko Tosho (sword smiths), Ko Katchushi (armour smiths) and Ji Sukashi tsuba. In regards to Ko Tosho and Ko Katchushi tsuba, it is generally thought that the Ko Tosho sword guards were introduced in or around the early Kamakura period [1192-1396ad] and were for the most part, the product of sword smiths. Ko Katchushi are thought to be a secondary line of work produced by Armour makers. The general theory is that these guards came into production at either the end of the Kamakura period or the early Nambokucho period. Both Ko Tosho and Ko Katchushi tsuba are also known as Mon-sukashi which refers to an openwork method used in their design. Shapes are pierced in negative silhouette into the flat body of the guard. The image is defined by the removal of the iron from the base.

Code: 19522

395.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Superior Edo Period Samurai Maedate Helmet Adornment of an Oni Demon

A maedate is a samurai adornment crest that affixes to the front of his armour helmet kabuto. They were removable and could be transferred to other helmets. Shown on a helmet kabuto for illustration puposes only. The maedate at its widest is 10.5 inches across. Although pricipally made as a samurai's helmet adornment they are highly collecatable in their own right as object d'art for display as fine Japanese works of art from the great Edo period of samurai history. Kabuto is a type of helmet first used by ancient Japanese warriors, and in later periods, they became an important part of the traditional Japanese armour worn by the samurai class and their retainers in feudal Japan. Japanese helmets dating from the fifth century (long before the rise of the samurai class) have been found in excavated tombs. Called mabizashi-tsuke kabuto (visor-attached helmet), the style of these ancient helmets came from China and Korea and they had a pronounced central ridge.

The kabuto was an important part of the equipment of the samurai, and played a symbolic role as well, which may explain the Japanese expressions, sayings and codes related to them. One example is Katte kabuto no o o shimeyo ( "Tighten the string of the kabuto after winning the war"). This means don't lower your efforts after succeeding (compare to "not to rest on one's laurels"). Also, kabuto o nugu ( "to take off the kabuto") means to surrender


Note that in Japanese language the word kabuto is an appellative, not a type description, and can refer to any combat helmet.
The Edo period or Tokugawa period is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyo. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The period came to an end with the Meiji Restoration on May 3, 1868, after the fall of Edo.

Code: 20681

1350.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Very Good Shinto Samurai Combat Ryo-Shinogi yari. Polearm

Very nice blade in polish showing a good hamon temper line. Double edged four sided. A thick stout blade that would have been enormously effective in trained hands. A Samurai ryo-shinogi yari polearm. Shinto period in nice order overall. Yari is the Japanese term for spear, or more specifically, the straight-headed spear. The martial art of wielding the yari is called sojutsu. A yari can range in length from one meter to upwards of six metres (3.3 to 20 feet). The longer versions were called omi no yari while shorter ones were known as mochi yari or tae yari. The longest versions were carried by foot troops (ashigaru), while samurai usually carried a shorter yari such as this example. Yari are believed to have been derived from Chinese spears, and while they were present in early Japan's history they did not become popular until the thirteenth century.The original warfare of the bushi was not a thing for "commoners"; it was a ritualized combat usually between two warriors who may challenge each other via horseback archery and sword duels. However, the attempted Mongol invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281 changed Japanese weaponry and warfare. The Mongol-employed Chinese and Korean footmen wielded long pikes, fought in tight formation, and moved in large units to stave off cavalry. Polearms (including naginata and yari) were of much greater military use than swords, due to their much greater range, their lesser weight per unit length (though overall a polearm would be fairly hefty), and their great piercing ability. Swords in a full battle situation were therefore relegated to emergency sidearm status from the Heian through the Muromachi periods. Around later half of sixteenth century, ashigaru holding pikes (naga yari) with length of 4.5 to 6.5 m (15 to 22 feet) or sometimes 10 m became main forces in armies. They formed lines, combined with harquebusiers and short spearmen. Pikemen formed two or three row of line, and were forced to move up and down their pikes in unison under the command.Yari overtook the popularity of the daikyu for the samurai, and foot troops (ashigaru) used them extensively as well
Various types of yari points or blades existed. The most common blade was a straight, flat, design that resembles a straight-bladed double edged dagger. This type of blade could cut as well as stab and was sharpened like a razor edge. Though yari is a catchall for spear, it is usually distinguished between kama yari, which have additional horizontal blades, and simple su yari (choku-so) or straight spears. Yari can also be distinguished by the types of blade cross section: the triangular sections were called sankaku yari and the diamond sections were called ryo-shinogi yari. 16.5 inch blade including tang, 7inch blade length, overall yari length 75 inches.

Code: 19565

1495.00 GBP


Shortlist item
A Super 16th to 17th Century Samurai Face Armour Yoroi Armour Face Mask 'Hanbo'

A rarely surviving early peice of facial armour from the great samurai era. Early Edo period. The maker of this remarkable face mask has emphasized its appearance by exaggerating the angularity of the cheeks and jawline through bold lines. The design is called ressai [ violent expression]. This mask is of fine quality, although very aged and worn, but it does display its antiquity very well. The tetsu russet surface has been finely finished and the embossing is sharp. Early Edo period. Overall condition is as expected for it's significant age with seperation on the laced neck defence. Some chips and minor rust and lacquer losses overall. It's type is the School of Nara style
It has an asenagashino ana [a hole under the chin to drain off perspiration] and orikugi [two projecting studs above the chin to provide a secure fastening to the wearer]. In the 16th century Japan began trading with Europe during what would become known as the Nanban trade. Samurai acquired European armour including the cuirass and comb morion which they modified and combined with domestic armour as it provided better protection from the newly introduced matchlock muskets known as Tanegashima. The introduction of the tanegashima by the Portuguese in 1543 changed the nature of warfare in Japan causing the Japanese armour makers to change the design of their armours from the centuries old lamellar armours to plate armour constructed from iron and steel plates which was called tosei gusoku (new armours). Bullet resistant armours were developed called tameshi gusoku or (bullet tested) allowing samurai to continue wearing their armour despite the use of firearms.
The era of warfare called the Sengoku period ended around 1600, Japan was united and entered a relatively peaceful Edo period. However, the Shoguns of the Tokugawa period were most adept at encouraging clan rivalries and conflicts and battles were engaged throughout the empire. This of course suited the Shogun very well, while all his subordinate daimyo fought each other they were unlkikely to conspire against him. Samurai use continued to use both plate and lamellar armour as a symbol of their status but traditional armours were no longer necessary for war, but still for battle

Code: 20182

995.00 GBP


Shortlist item
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