Antique Arms & Militaria

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A Fine Scarce, Antique, Chinese Dadao Sword, Ching Dynasty. Used From the Opium Wars and The Boxer Rebellion. The Ching or Qing Dynasty Was Founded From 1644 and Ruled Until 1912.

A Fine Scarce, Antique, Chinese Dadao Sword, Ching Dynasty. Used From the Opium Wars and The Boxer Rebellion. The Ching or Qing Dynasty Was Founded From 1644 and Ruled Until 1912.

A big and impressive sword with a long single edged blade. Black iron mounts to the leather bound scabbard and sword guard, round pommel wide cord wrapped grip, with plaited sword knot. Made in the Ching {Qing} Dynasty. Used during the Taiping Rebellion, the Opium Wars and into the Boxer Rebellion era, and most likely brought back to England by a soldier that either served in the Taiping Rebellion the Opium War, or defended the legations at the siege in Peking.

This weight of sword was frequently used not only in battle but for executions. All black finish.
The Taiping Rebellion was a widespread civil war in southern China from 1850 to 1864, led by heterodox Christian convert Hong Xiuquan, who having received visions, maintained that he was the younger brother of Jesus Christ against the ruling Manchu-led Qing Dynasty. About 20 million people died, mainly civilians, in one of the deadliest military conflicts in history.

Hong established the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom, officially the "Heavenly Kingdom of Great Peace", with its capital at Nanjing. The Kingdom's army controlled large parts of southern China, at its height containing about 30 million people. The rebels attempted social reforms believing in shared "property in common" and the replacement of Confucianism, Buddhism and Chinese folk religion with a form of Christianity. The Taiping troops were nicknamed "Long Hair" by the Qing {Ching} government. The Taiping areas were besieged by Qing forces throughout most of the rebellion. The Qing government crushed the rebellion with the eventual aid of French and British forces. The Opium Wars, also known as the Anglo-Chinese Wars, divided into the First Opium War from 1839 to 1842 and the Second Opium War from 1856 to 1860, were the climax of disputes over trade and diplomatic relations between China under the Qing Dynasty and the British Empire. After the inauguration of the Canton System in 1756, which restricted trade to one port and did not allow foreign entrance to China, the British East India Company faced a trade imbalance in favour of China and invested heavily in opium production to redress the balance. British and United States merchants brought opium from the British East India Company's factories in Patna and Benares, in the Indian state of Bengal, to the coast of China, where they sold it to Chinese smugglers who distributed the drug in defiance of Chinese laws. Aware both of the drain of silver and the growing numbers of addicts, the Dao Guang Emperor demanded action. Officials at the court who advocated legalization of the trade in order to tax it were defeated by those who advocated suppression. In 1838, the Emperor sent Lin Zexu to Guangzhou where he quickly arrested Chinese opium dealers and summarily demanded that foreign firms turn over their stocks. When they refused, Lin stopped trade altogether and placed the foreign residents under virtual siege, eventually forcing the merchants to surrender their opium to be destroyed. In response, the British government sent expeditionary forces from India which ravaged the Chinese coast and dictated the terms of settlement. The Treaty of Nanking not only opened the way for further opium trade, but ceded territory including Hong Kong, unilaterally fixed Chinese tariffs at a low rate, granted extraterritorial rights to foreigners in China which were not offered to Chinese abroad, a most favoured nation clause, as well as diplomatic representation. When the court still refused to accept foreign ambassadors and obstructed the trade clauses of the treaties, disputes over the treatment of British merchants in Chinese ports and on the seas led to the Second Opium War and the Treaty of Tientsin.
Hero of China, British General Gordon, was presented with an identical example, and he is carrying his, while dress in his Chinese garb, in the picture shown in the gallery. He was known affectionately as "Chinese" or "China" Gordon. Overall very good condition. He later became known as Gordon of Khartoum, as he was assassinated by the Mahdi's warriors at the end of the siege of Khartoum

The Qing dynasty, officially the Great Qing, was the Manchu-led last dynasty in the imperial history of China. It was proclaimed in 1636 in Manchuria, in 1644 entered Beijing, extended its rule to cover all of China proper, and then extended the empire into Inner Asia. The dynasty lasted until 1912. The Qing Dynasty fell in 1911, overthrown by a revolution brewing since 1894 when western-educated revolutionary Sun Zhongshan formed the Revive China Society in Hawaii, then Hong Kong. In 1911, the Nationalist Party of China held an uprising in Wuchang, helped by Qing soldiers, and 15 provinces declared their independence from the empire. Within weeks the Qing court agreed to the creation of a republic with its top general, Yuan Shikai, as president.

Xuantog abdicated in 1912, with Sun creating a provisional constitution for the new country, which ushered in years of political unrest centered around Yuan.

In 1917, there was a brief attempt to reinstate the Qing government, with Xuantog being restored for less than two weeks during a military coup that ultimately failed.

The Boxer Rebellion, more properly called the Boxer Uprising, or the Righteous Harmony Society Movement was a violent anti-foreign, anti-Christian movement called the "Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists" in China, but known as the "Boxers" in English. The main 'Boxer' era occurred between 1898 and 1901. This fascinating era was fairly well described in the Hollywood movie classic ' 55 Days in Peking' Starring Charlton Heston and David Niven. The film gives a little background of Ching Dynasty's humiliating military defeats suffered during the Opium Wars, Sino-French War and Sino-Japanese war or the effect of the Taiping Rebellion in weakening the Ching Qing Dynasty. However, situations in which the various colonial powers exerted influence over China (a great source of outrage that drove many Chinese to violence) are alluded to in the scene in which Sir Arthur Robinson and Major Lewis visit the Empress after the assassination of the German minister.

* Dowager Empress - "….the Boxer bandits will be dealt with, but the anger of the Chinese people cannot be quieted so easily. The Germans have seized Kiaochow, the Russians have seized Port Arthur, the French have obtained concessions in Yunnan, Kwan See and Kwantang. In all, 13 of the 18 provinces of China are under foreign control. Foreign warships occupy our harbours, foreign armies occupy our forts, foreign merchants administer our banks, foreign gods disturb the spirit of our ancestors. Is it surprising that our people are aroused?"
* Sir Arthur Robinson - "Your Majesty if you permit me to observe, the violence of the Boxers will not redress the grievences of China"
* Dowager Empress - "China is a prostrate cow, the powers are not content milking her, but must also butcher her."
* Sir Arthur Robinson - "If China is a cow your majesty, she is indeed a marvelous animal. She gives meat as well as milk…." The Dadao was continually used by Chinese Nationalist Army in the 1930's. the Pictures in the gallery of the Boxers 1900 and the combat in the siege.  read more

Code: 25382

1295.00 GBP

A British Soldier's Souvenir of The Crimean War. An Imperial Russian Foot Artilleryman's Saw-Back Short Sword, Tesak. Used By The Russian Artillery Men To Protect the Cannon. Probably A Souvenir Of The 'Charge' Period Cavalryman

A British Soldier's Souvenir of The Crimean War. An Imperial Russian Foot Artilleryman's Saw-Back Short Sword, Tesak. Used By The Russian Artillery Men To Protect the Cannon. Probably A Souvenir Of The 'Charge' Period Cavalryman

Cast brass hilt and wide saw-back steel blade, bearing numerous Romanov stamps. There is an identical example in "Crimean Memories, Artefacts Of The Crimean War" Manufacture dated 1847.

Very impressive are extremely rare Russian Imperial Model 1834 Tesak. They were adopted in March 1834 and used til 1855 only. It played an important role in the Crimean wars, used by the men protecting the cannon {artillery guns}.
Beautiful example, seldom found

In 1854 the regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of Cardigan were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera.
On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route.
On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by
late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry in reserve.
During the 25 October the regiments, the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade.
The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the 4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his
men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed, they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavouring to surround them by closing in on either flank.
However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. Capt. Louis Edward Nolan (January 4 1818-October 25 1854), who was a British Army officer of the Victorian era, an authority on cavalry tactics, and best known for his controversial role in launching the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Battle of Balaclava. He was the first casualty of that engagement.

Over two decades ago we were delighted to buy Captain Nolan's undress sabretache that was used to carry the order in the Charge of the Light Brigade, and was recovered from beneath his and his horses bodies after the battle. It spent most of its life after the charge in two museums, one at the rebuilt and re-sited Crystal Palace in London. We were privileged to buy direct it from the original family owners with the personal assistance of the late Gordon Gardner, Militaria Expert of Sotheby's from 1979  read more

Code: 25384

SOLD

A Very Scarce 1821 Pattern, Crimean War Service, Cavalry Trooper's Sabre In It's Combat Scabbard with Regt. Markings, Makers Name. and Ordnance Stamps. The Same Form Of Sabre Used In The Charge of the Life Brigade At Balaclava

A Very Scarce 1821 Pattern, Crimean War Service, Cavalry Trooper's Sabre In It's Combat Scabbard with Regt. Markings, Makers Name. and Ordnance Stamps. The Same Form Of Sabre Used In The Charge of the Life Brigade At Balaclava

As used in the Crimean War such as the infamous and renown 'Charge of the Light Brigade' by troopers of several regiments, other regiments used the 1853 pattern sabre. A most impressive sabre, and very good indeed. The very type of ordnance made and issued Hussar's and Lancer's trooper's sabre used by British Cavalry Officer's in the ill fated charge in the Crimean War against Russia. All steel three bar steel hilt, combat blade with leather covered wooden ribbed grip. Steel scabbard with regimental markings, but very difficult to read.

Absolutely used at the time and used by all the serving cavalry troopers still issued with the 1821 pattern sabre, in the famous 'Charge'. In the Crimean War (1854-56), the Light Dragoons were in the forefront of the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalized by Tennyson's poem of that name ("Into the valley of death rode the six hundred").
The regiments adopted the title hussars at this time, and the uniform became very stylish, aping the hussars of the Austro-Hungarian army. But soon the blues and yellows and golds gave way to khaki as the British army found itself in skirmishes throughout the far-flung Empire, in India and South Africa especially.
In 1854 the regiment received its orders from the War Office to prepare for service overseas. Five transport ships - Harbinger, Negotiator, Calliope, Cullodon, and the Mary Anne – embarking between the 8 May and 12 May, carried 20 officers, 292 other ranks and 298 horses. After a troubled voyage, the regiment arrived at Varna, Bulgaria on the 2 June. On the 28 August the entire Light Brigade (consisting of the 4th Light Dragoons and 13th Light Dragoons, 17th Lancers, the 8th Hussars and 11th Hussars, under the command of Major General the Earl of Cardigan were inspected by Lord Lucan; five men of the 13th had already succumbed to cholera.
On the 1 September the regiment embarked for the Crimea - a further three men dying en-route.
On the 20 September the regiment, as part the Light Brigade, took part in the first major engagement of the Crimean War, the Battle of the Alma. The Light Brigade covered the left flank, although the regiment’s role in the battle was minimal. With the Russians in full retreat by
late afternoon, Lord Lucan ordered the Light Brigade to pursue the fleeing enemy. However, the brigade was recalled by Lord Raglan as the Russians had kept some 3,000 uncommitted cavalry in reserve.
During the 25 October the regiments, the Light Brigade, took part in the Battle of Balaclava and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade.
The 13th Light Dragoons formed the right of the front line. The 13th and 17th moved forward; after 100 yards the 11th Hussars, in the second line, also moved off followed by the 4th and 8th. It was not long before the brigade came under heavy Russian fire. Lord Cardigan, at the front of his
men, charged into the Russian guns receiving a slight wound. He was soon followed by the 13th and 17th. The two squadrons of the 13th and the right squadron of the 17th were soon cutting down the artillerymen that had remained at their posts. Once the Russian guns had been passed, they engaged in a hand-to-hand fighting with the enemy that was endeavouring to surround them by closing in on either flank.
However, the Light Brigade having insufficient forces and suffering heavy casualties, were soon forced to retire. Capt. Louis Edward Nolan (January 4 1818-October 25 1854), who was a British Army officer of the Victorian era, an authority on cavalry tactics, and best known for his controversial role in launching the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade during the Battle of Balaclava. He was the first casualty of that engagement. It is very nice to see an ordnance, Enfield made, and front line regimental issue most rarely surviving example. It has super edged-to-edge close combat edge cuts, possibly gained while used against Russian Artillerymen.

Over two decades ago we were delighted to buy Captain Nolan's undress sabretache that was used to carry the order in the Charge of the Light Brigade, and was recovered from beneath his and his horses bodies after the battle. It spent most of its life after the charge in two museums, one at the rebuilt and re-sited Crystal Palace in London. We were privileged to buy direct it from the original family owners with the personal assistance of the late Gordon Gardner, Militaria Expert of Sotheby's from 1979  read more

Code: 25383

675.00 GBP

19th Century Oil Portrait of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke Of Wellington, The Iron Duke, The Victor Of Napoleon’s Waterloo in 1815, With Marshal Blucher.

19th Century Oil Portrait of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke Of Wellington, The Iron Duke, The Victor Of Napoleon’s Waterloo in 1815, With Marshal Blucher.

After Sir Thomas Lawrence

Portrait of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, K.G., K.B., M.P. (1769-1852), bust-length, in civilian clothes with a military cloak, wearing the insignia of the Order of the Golden Fleece
Oil on canvas, nicely framed.
Lawrence was specially commissioned by George IV to paint a pantheon of military heroes, diplomats and powerful heads of state responsible for the defeat of Napoleon initially in 1814 and ultimately (after his escape from Elba) at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815. These paintings were initially proposed for Carlton House, but George IV’s plans for Windsor Castle latterly came to include a new room specially created for the display of Lawrence’s portraits: the Waterloo Chamber. The similar posed drawing of Wellington pictured in our gallery was purchased by Sir Henry Russell in 1842 was once believed to be Lawrence's original study for the subsequent oils he painted on which our portait that we offer here is based and it could have been drawn as early as 1814 when Farington noted Wellington's first visit to Lawrence's studio, however, Sir Henry Russell would have been naturally optimistic about his drawing and it was not Lawrence's usual practice to begin a sitting with this type of sketch. It has more the air of being a pencil copy made later from one of the oils and kept in the studio possibly as a reminder or for a present or even made expressly for Lewis's engraving published eventually long after Lawrence's death. The head is similar to that in the Apsley House oil of c.1815-16 but the high collar resembles its later variant painted for Charles Arbuthnot MP, exhibited RA 1822 and multiplied in numerous studio copies. Our painting is 19th century, an oil on canvas, framed in a 20th century gilt and black wooden frame. Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (1 May 1769 ? 14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and Tory statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister. He ended the Napoleonic Wars when he defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

Wellesley was born in Dublin into the Protestant Ascendancy in Ireland. He was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army in 1787, serving in Ireland as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland. He was also elected as a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons. He was a colonel by 1796 and saw action in the Netherlands and in India, where he fought in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War at the Battle of Seringapatam. He was appointed governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799 and, as a newly appointed major-general, won a decisive victory over the Maratha Confederacy at the Battle of Assaye in 1803.

Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French Empire at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to France and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded the allied army which, together with a Prussian Army under Blucher, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. Wellington's battle record is exemplary; he ultimately participated in some 60 battles during the course of his military career.

Wellington is famous for his adaptive defensive style of warfare, resulting in several victories against numerically superior forces while minimising his own losses. He is regarded as one of the greatest defensive commanders of all time, and many of his tactics and battle plans are still studied in military academies around the world. After the end of his active military career, he returned to politics. He was twice British prime minister as a member of the Tory party: from 1828 to 1830, and for a little less than a month in 1834. He oversaw the passage of the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, but opposed the Reform Act 1832. He continued as one of the leading figures in the House of Lords until his retirement and remained Commander-in-Chief of the British Army until his death. Portrait by an unknown artist. However, original late Georgian to Victorian copies of this portrait are extremely popular and in 2014 another copy was estimated to sel at £2,000-£4,000 eventually achieved £27,500.

In frame; 14 inches x 18.25 inches  read more

Code: 23074

850.00 GBP

A Rare & Huge, M1863 Single Action Starr Army 'Long Barrel' Revolver of the Civil War, .44 Calibre. Exactly As Can Be Seen Featured in Clint Eastwood’s Oscar Winning Movie, ‘The Unforgiven’

A Rare & Huge, M1863 Single Action Starr Army 'Long Barrel' Revolver of the Civil War, .44 Calibre. Exactly As Can Be Seen Featured in Clint Eastwood’s Oscar Winning Movie, ‘The Unforgiven’

Single action 1863 model. Good external condition for age An impressive, big and powerful .44 cal revolver of the Civil War and early Wild West. Alongside the Colt Dragoon this was the biggest pistol of the Civil War, and it has amazing presence with an 8 inch barrel. Starr was the third largest producer of revolvers for the Union behind Colt and Remington.During the war the M-1863 Starr was issued to a number of US cavalry regiments, including the 1st Colorado Cavalry, the 6th & 7th Michigan Cavalry and the 11th New York Cavalry, just to name a few. While Starr double action revolver production started in 1858 they did not start production of the single action until 1863 finishing in 1865. Total Model 1863 S.A. production was approximately 25,000 revolvers making them rare finds today. The Model 1863 Single Action .44 calibre percussion Army Revolver was the third of the Starr revolvers produced for the military. Between September, 1863 and December 22, 1864, the Starr Arms Company delivered 25,002 Model 1863 Army revolvers to the Ordnance Department. The government's cost for this arm was $12.00 each. These arms and components were produced in Starr's plants in Yonkers, Binghamton and Moorisania. The grips on this gun are very good. The big long barrel Starr Army Revolver is the pistol that was chosen by the hero in Clint Eastwood's Academy Award winning movie 'The Unforgiven' played by Clint Eastwood, and the pistol was in fact featured as the main promotional part of the film in the 'Unforgiven' poster, see picture of the Starr Revolver, in the poster, in our gallery copyright Warner Bros.Single-action Army model of 1863 in .44 chambering with production numbers reaching 3,000, 21,454 and 23,000 respectively.
Design of the pistol fell to Ebanezar (Eban) Townsend Starr and all of the guns were manufactured out of the Starr Arms Company facility of Binghampton and Yonkers, New York for Federal service. The guns relied on a percussion cap system of operation with each chamber of the six-round cylinder loaded with a charge and a ball. Percussion caps were set upon the awaiting nipples found at each chamber. The hammer then fell on these caps to produce the needed ignition of the propellant charge within each chamber, the resultant forces propelling the ball out of the barrel. Externally, the revolver was of a conventional design arrangement. The handle was ergonomically curved for a good fit in the hand while being covered in useful grips. A solid frame was featured around the rotating six-shot cylinder which offered strength that open-frame revolvers of the period generally lacked. The hammer protruded from the rear of the frame within reach of the shooting hand's thumb for actuation as necessary. A loading arm was positioned under the barrel to help ram the contents of the chambers to the rear (and thus closer to the percussion cap's port). The barrel sat over this arm in the usual way, the ball projectiles guided into it by way of a proper seal from the cylinder's front face to the barrel's rear end. All in all, a traditional revolver arrangement that was proven to work. Sighting was by way of iron fittings over the top of the gun.

The gun has been made none actionable by the removal of such as the mainspring and cylinder ratchet pawl etc. { that are no longer present} very possibly as a simple way to temporarily deactivate its use for historical display. All the missing parts are relatively easy to be sourced in America, likely for a few hundred dollars, but its next owner may not wish to, or even need to bother, as it is no longer to be used, However, the price very much reflects the fact of the lack of the working internal action parts, which makes this revolver incredibly inexpensive and great value, due to its now completely non functioning condition, yet it is still a fascinating, original, historical souvenir of the US Civil War. FYI, Our last complete operable example we sold for £2850. Thus, one can acquire this 90% original, but only internally incomplete revolver of the Civil War, for considerablely less than 50% it’s worth.
As with all our antique guns no licence is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables.  read more

Code: 25258

1350.00 GBP

An Excellent 1796 Napoleonic Wars British Light Dragoon Trooper's Sword, In Exceptional Condition, Line Rank Issue

An Excellent 1796 Napoleonic Wars British Light Dragoon Trooper's Sword, In Exceptional Condition, Line Rank Issue

All steel scabbard, with steel P hilt and leather bound grip. The blade is very good indeed, and nicely bright overall, made circa 1802 to 1803. All the steel mounts have excellent patina. Overall very nice condition for age, obviously seen combat service but it has been cared for very well since it left service over 200 years ago

The mounted swordsmanship training of the British emphasised the cut, at the face for maiming or killing, or at the arms to disable. This left masses of mutilated or disabled troops; the French, in contrast, favoured the thrust, which gave cleaner kills. A cut with the 1796 LC sabre was, however, perfectly capable of killing outright, as was recorded by George Farmer of the 11th Regiment of Light Dragoons, who was involved in a skirmish on the Guadiana River in 1811, during the Peninsular War:
"Just then a French officer stooping over the body of one of his countrymen, who dropped the instant on his horse's neck, delivered a thrust at poor Harry Wilson's body; and delivered it effectually. I firmly believe that Wilson died on the instant yet, though he felt the sword in its progress, he, with characteristic self-command, kept his eye on the enemy in his front; and, raising himself in his stirrups, let fall upon the Frenchman's head such a blow, that brass and skull parted before it, and the man's head was cloven asunder to the chin. It was the most tremendous blow I ever beheld struck; and both he who gave, and his opponent who received it, dropped dead together. The brass helmet was afterwards examined by order of a French officer, who, as well as myself, was astonished at the exploit; and the cut was found to be as clean as if the sword had gone through a turnip, not so much as a dint being left on either side of it" The blade is remembered today as one of the best of its time and has been described as the finest cutting sword ever manufactured in quantity.

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of trading  read more

Code: 25375

1300.00 GBP

A Superb, Original, Victorian, 1889 Pattern Royal Naval Combat Cutlass Made At The Enfield Armoury. For Repelling Boarders, Ship to Ship Combat, And Shore Party Protection

A Superb, Original, Victorian, 1889 Pattern Royal Naval Combat Cutlass Made At The Enfield Armoury. For Repelling Boarders, Ship to Ship Combat, And Shore Party Protection

Traditional original blackened steel bowl, with cast iron ribbed grip, fully ordnance inspected WD {War Department} and duly stamped. Overall excellent condition for age and service use.

With full maker markings and standard RN blackened hilt. The sailors weapon of choice for several centuries. The use of edged weapons on board ships has a long history.

The cutlass has been the sailor's weapon for many years in western navies before its demise in the mid 20th century. It is a fairly heavy naval sword with a single-edged blade with return false edge of medium length which is generally given a very slight curve, but may often be straight.

The blade's weight is concentrated to provide a shattering blow delivered with the edge of the blade. There is little in the design to facilitate the use of the point, nor is it easy to parry another's blow. This is a sword designed for simplistic use by a user who has had little training in fencing.

Therefore the cutlass-wielding sailor would have usually been out-fought by a swordsman who kept his cool and used the point to break up a sailor's line of attack. Nevertheless, the weight of a cutlass blade would often be enough to sweep a lighter blade out of the way. It would indeed be an interesting match between a cutlass-wielding British sailor versus a French officer.

The term "cutlass" seems to have come into use by default as it was not an official term in the early days of the British Navy. Indeed, the word cutlass comes from the French coutelas.

Swords can be seen on ordnance lists from 1645. They were habitually carried on land by some men, both as a defence and to signify the status of the wearer - the peasant's weapon being a more clumsy bill, or spear.

The sword required some expense in its purchase and indeed could be decorated to its owner's wish. The term cutlass seems to have been applied to sea swords and then stuck.

In the early 1700s the most famous of cutlass designs was taken up by the Royal Navy. This was the "double disk" cutlass, perhaps invented by Thomas Hollier, which featured two disks of steel as a guard joined by a broad strip of metal to complete protection for the hand. Thousands of these weapons were turned out by a variety of manufacturers and the weapon was used by a variety of navies.

Sailors received little training in sword technique and indeed these weapons were often snatched up at the last minute from chests kept on deck, either to repel boarders or to take on a boarding made against another ship.
Scabbards were not needed because a sailor would need his cutlass for immediate use in battle. However one in ten were made with scabbards for shore parties.
Boarding over the side of another ship in the days of sail was often a difficult affair. Sometimes the enemy's vessel could be much bigger than your own, or indeed much smaller, necessitating either a climb up the gunports and through the anti-boarding nettings of the other ship or a plunge down, probably on a rope's end, onto the deck of the smaller vessel.
At the encounter between the 14-gun Speedy and the 32-gun Gamo in 1801 a British boarding party led by Captain Thomas Cochrane took the Spanish frigate by boarding in a fierce action. The small British ship was manoeuvred to come close alongside the enemy and eventually under the Spanish guns' maximum depression. Then Cochrane led the entire 40 crew - except for eight casualties and the surgeon who was left at the wheel.

Armed with cutlasses, axes and pikes the British sailors fought ferociously in hand-to-hand combat with Cochrane calling loudly for another 50 fictitious reinforcements to follow. The Spanish flung down their weapons and surrendered.

The RN retained cutlasses in service aboard vessals officially until 1936, although there are reports of personnel carrying such weapons in WWII. And it is still used in Courts Marshal. The cutlass was last officially used in the Altmark incident where the British Naval Ship, HMS Cossack, liberated the prisoners captured by the Battleship Graf Spee that were being transported illegally through Norwegian waters by the German ship Altmark.

A previous owner stated this sword was used on HMS Cossack, alongside their other later pattern cutlasses, but we have absolutely no way of substantiating this  read more

Code: 25379

575.00 GBP

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. Bearing the Profile Cast Portraits of the Crowned King and Queen

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. Bearing the Profile Cast Portraits of the Crowned King and Queen

The sword of choice for senior officer's {Admirals and Captain's} serving in the Royal Navy during the 17th and early 18th century. we show three portraits in the gallery of admirals of the age each bearing their same swords.

Short flat sided blade. Antler handle made of antler of a male deer, called “hartshorn,” brass single knuckle bow bar hilt with cap, most unusual pierced pommel, and its single ovoid, fully pierced guard bearing the cast portrait images of the crowned King William on the outer upper shell and Queen Mary on the under part of the inner shell. Blade bears two 'king's heads' armourer's marks. Most unusual fully pierced shell guard decorated with two stylised heads in profile, of Queen Mary on one side and the King William on the other. with numerous other depictions of the monarchs in other areas. overall in superb condition for its age.

Another similar 'William and Mary portrait bust hilted cutlass hangar was recovered {in a very poor state} from the wreck of notorious pirate, Captain Blackbeard's ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge, that was found at Beaufort inlet in 1996, the remains of the vessel have become the property of the people of North Carolina. And another 'William and Mary' portrait bust sword-cutlass is in a museum collection in Colonial Williamsburg in America.

William and Mary were the co-regnants over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, namely the Dutch Prince of Orange King William III (& II) and his spouse (and first cousin) Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February 1689 after they were offered the throne by the Convention Parliament irregularly summoned by William after his victorious invasion of England in November 1688, the so-called Glorious Revolution. They replaced James II (& VII), Mary's father, who fled the country. Parliament offered William and Mary a co-regency, at the couple's behest. After Mary died in 1694, William ruled alone until his death in 1702. William and Mary were childless and were ultimately succeeded by Mary's younger sister, Anne.
This was the most popular form of sword used by the early British Naval Commanders when at sea. There are numerous great portraits in the National Gallery, and at the National Maritime Museum, of 17th and 18th century Admirals adorned with identical swords. Such as Admirals Benbow, Shovel et al. we show three such portraits in our gallery, of Hopsonn, Shovel and Benbow.

Vice-Admiral John Benbow (10 March 1653 – 4 November 1702) was an English Royal Navy officer. He joined the Navy in 1678, seeing action against Barbary pirates before leaving to join the Merchant Navy in which Benbow served until the 1688 Glorious Revolution, whereupon he returned to the Royal Navy and was commissioned.

Benbow fought against the French Navy during the Nine Years' War, serving on and later commanding several English warships and taking part in the battles of Beachy Head and Barfleur and La Hogue in 1690 and 1692. He went on to achieve fame during his military accomplishments, which included fighting against Barbary pirates such as the Salé Rovers, besieging Saint-Malo and seeing action in the West Indies against the French during the War of the Spanish Succession.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Cloudesley Shovell (c. November 1650 – 22 or 23 October 1707) was an English naval officer. As a junior officer he saw action at the Battle of Solebay and then at the Battle of Texel during the Third Anglo-Dutch War. As a captain he fought at the Battle of Bantry Bay during the Williamite War in Ireland.

As a flag officer Shovell commanded a division at the Battle of Barfleur during the Nine Years' War, and during the battle distinguished himself by being the first to break through the enemy's line. Along with Admiral Henry Killigrew and Admiral Ralph Delaval, Shovell was put in joint command of the fleet shortly afterwards.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Shovell commanded a squadron which served under Admiral George Rooke at the capture of Gibraltar and the Battle of Málaga. Working in conjunction with a landing force under the Earl of Peterborough, his forces undertook the siege and capture of Barcelona. He was appointed commander-in-chief of the Navy while at Lisbon the following year. He also commanded the naval element of a combined attack on Toulon, base of the main French fleet, in coordination with the Austrian army under Prince Eugene of Savoy in the summer of 1707. Later that year, on the return voyage to England, Shovell and more than 1,400 others perished in a disastrous shipwreck off the Isles of Scilly.

Thomas Hopsonn enjoyed a naval command on 18 May 1688, when James II appointed him to the Bonaventure. This ship was part of the fleet sent to The Nore under Strickland to prevent the Dutch invasion. However, Hopsonn was one of the conspirators within the fleet who supported William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution.

Following the revolution, Hopsonn retained command of the Bonaventure and was part of the squadron that relieved the siege of Derry in June 1689. On 28 October 1689, he was posted to the York, and commanded that vessel during the battle of Beachy Head the following year. Hopsonn's immediate commander in the battle was Sir George Rooke, who formed a high opinion of his gallantry and was afterwards much associated with him. He commanded Royal Katherine for two months starting in August 1690, before moving to command the St Michael. It was aboard the latter that he followed Rooke in the battle of Barfleur on 19 May 1692. In the same year, he was promoted to become a captain in the foot guards on the recommendation of admiral Edward Russell.

****Priced to include delivery to the US  read more

Code: 25362

SOLD

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Period Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. Gold Inlaid Flower Head Stamped Blade

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Period Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. Gold Inlaid Flower Head Stamped Blade

From a superb family collection we just acquired, that was accumulated over decades, of fine early swords, pistols and cutlasses.

The sword of choice for senior officer's {Admirals and Captain's} serving in the Royal Navy during the 17th and early 18th century. we show three portraits in the gallery of admirals of the age each bearing their same swords.

Short flat sided blade. Antler handle made of antler of a male deer, called “hartshorn,” brass single knuckle bow bar hilt with cap pommel.
Blade bears two armourer's marks, of an 8 petealed flower stem and leaf with gold inlay. Overall in superb condition for its age.

Another very similar 'William and Mary period cutlass hangar was recovered {in a very poor state} from the wreck of notorious pirate, Captain Blackbeard's ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge, that was found at Beaufort inlet in 1996, the remains of the vessel have become the property of the people of North Carolina. And another 'William and Mary' period sword-cutlass is in a museum collection in Colonial Williamsburg in America.

William and Mary were the co-regnants over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, namely the Dutch Prince of Orange King William III (& II) and his spouse (and first cousin) Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February 1689 after they were offered the throne by the Convention Parliament irregularly summoned by William after his victorious invasion of England in November 1688, the so-called Glorious Revolution. They replaced James II (& VII), Mary's father, who fled the country. Parliament offered William and Mary a co-regency, at the couple's behest. After Mary died in 1694, William ruled alone until his death in 1702. William and Mary were childless and were ultimately succeeded by Mary's younger sister, Anne.
This was the most popular form of sword used by the early British Naval Commanders when at sea. There are numerous great portraits in the National Gallery, and at the National Maritime Museum, of 17th and 18th century Admirals adorned with identical swords. Such as Admirals Benbow, Shovel et al. we show three such portraits in our gallery, of Hopsonn, Shovel and Benbow.

Vice-Admiral John Benbow (10 March 1653 – 4 November 1702) was an English Royal Navy officer. He joined the Navy in 1678, seeing action against Barbary pirates before leaving to join the Merchant Navy in which Benbow served until the 1688 Glorious Revolution, whereupon he returned to the Royal Navy and was commissioned.

Benbow fought against the French Navy during the Nine Years' War, serving on and later commanding several English warships and taking part in the battles of Beachy Head and Barfleur and La Hogue in 1690 and 1692. He went on to achieve fame during his military accomplishments, which included fighting against Barbary pirates such as the Salé Rovers, besieging Saint-Malo and seeing action in the West Indies against the French during the War of the Spanish Succession.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Cloudesley Shovell (c. November 1650 – 22 or 23 October 1707) was an English naval officer. As a junior officer he saw action at the Battle of Solebay and then at the Battle of Texel during the Third Anglo-Dutch War. As a captain he fought at the Battle of Bantry Bay during the Williamite War in Ireland.

As a flag officer Shovell commanded a division at the Battle of Barfleur during the Nine Years' War, and during the battle distinguished himself by being the first to break through the enemy's line. Along with Admiral Henry Killigrew and Admiral Ralph Delaval, Shovell was put in joint command of the fleet shortly afterwards.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Shovell commanded a squadron which served under Admiral George Rooke at the capture of Gibraltar and the Battle of Málaga. Working in conjunction with a landing force under the Earl of Peterborough, his forces undertook the siege and capture of Barcelona. He was appointed commander-in-chief of the Navy while at Lisbon the following year. He also commanded the naval element of a combined attack on Toulon, base of the main French fleet, in coordination with the Austrian army under Prince Eugene of Savoy in the summer of 1707. Later that year, on the return voyage to England, Shovell and more than 1,400 others perished in a disastrous shipwreck off the Isles of Scilly.

Thomas Hopsonn enjoyed a naval command on 18 May 1688, when James II appointed him to the Bonaventure. This ship was part of the fleet sent to The Nore under Strickland to prevent the Dutch invasion. However, Hopsonn was one of the conspirators within the fleet who supported William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution.

Following the revolution, Hopsonn retained command of the Bonaventure and was part of the squadron that relieved the siege of Derry in June 1689. On 28 October 1689, he was posted to the York, and commanded that vessel during the battle of Beachy Head the following year. Hopsonn's immediate commander in the battle was Sir George Rooke, who formed a high opinion of his gallantry and was afterwards much associated with him. He commanded Royal Katherine for two months starting in August 1690, before moving to command the St Michael. It was aboard the latter that he followed Rooke in the battle of Barfleur on 19 May 1692. In the same year, he was promoted to become a captain in the foot guards on the recommendation of admiral Edward Russell.  read more

Code: 25381

895.00 GBP

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Period Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. King's Head Stamped Blade

A Very Fine, 17th Century, King 'William & Queen Mary' Period Hangar Sword Cutlass of Senior Naval Officer's Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy. King's Head Stamped Blade

The sword of choice for senior officer's {Admirals and Captain's} serving in the Royal Navy during the 17th and early 18th century. we show three portraits in the gallery of admirals of the age each bearing their same swords.

Short flat sided blade. Antler handle made of antler of a male deer, called “hartshorn,” brass single knuckle bow bar hilt with cap pommel.
Blade bears two 'king's heads' armourer's marks. Overall in superb condition for its age.
Another very similar 'William and Mary hilted cutlass hangar was recovered {in a very poor state} from the wreck of notorious pirate, Captain Blackbeard's ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge, that was found at Beaufort inlet in 1996, the remains of the vessel have become the property of the people of North Carolina. And another 'William and Mary' period sword-cutlass is in a museum collection in Colonial Williamsburg in America.

William and Mary were the co-regnants over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, namely the Dutch Prince of Orange King William III (& II) and his spouse (and first cousin) Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February 1689 after they were offered the throne by the Convention Parliament irregularly summoned by William after his victorious invasion of England in November 1688, the so-called Glorious Revolution. They replaced James II (& VII), Mary's father, who fled the country. Parliament offered William and Mary a co-regency, at the couple's behest. After Mary died in 1694, William ruled alone until his death in 1702. William and Mary were childless and were ultimately succeeded by Mary's younger sister, Anne.
This was the most popular form of sword used by the early British Naval Commanders when at sea. There are numerous great portraits in the National Gallery, and at the National Maritime Museum, of 17th and 18th century Admirals adorned with identical swords. Such as Admirals Benbow, Shovel et al. we show three such portraits in our gallery, of Hopsonn, Shovel and Benbow.

Vice-Admiral John Benbow (10 March 1653 – 4 November 1702) was an English Royal Navy officer. He joined the Navy in 1678, seeing action against Barbary pirates before leaving to join the Merchant Navy in which Benbow served until the 1688 Glorious Revolution, whereupon he returned to the Royal Navy and was commissioned.

Benbow fought against the French Navy during the Nine Years' War, serving on and later commanding several English warships and taking part in the battles of Beachy Head and Barfleur and La Hogue in 1690 and 1692. He went on to achieve fame during his military accomplishments, which included fighting against Barbary pirates such as the Salé Rovers, besieging Saint-Malo and seeing action in the West Indies against the French during the War of the Spanish Succession.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Cloudesley Shovell (c. November 1650 – 22 or 23 October 1707) was an English naval officer. As a junior officer he saw action at the Battle of Solebay and then at the Battle of Texel during the Third Anglo-Dutch War. As a captain he fought at the Battle of Bantry Bay during the Williamite War in Ireland.

As a flag officer Shovell commanded a division at the Battle of Barfleur during the Nine Years' War, and during the battle distinguished himself by being the first to break through the enemy's line. Along with Admiral Henry Killigrew and Admiral Ralph Delaval, Shovell was put in joint command of the fleet shortly afterwards.

During the War of the Spanish Succession, Shovell commanded a squadron which served under Admiral George Rooke at the capture of Gibraltar and the Battle of Málaga. Working in conjunction with a landing force under the Earl of Peterborough, his forces undertook the siege and capture of Barcelona. He was appointed commander-in-chief of the Navy while at Lisbon the following year. He also commanded the naval element of a combined attack on Toulon, base of the main French fleet, in coordination with the Austrian army under Prince Eugene of Savoy in the summer of 1707. Later that year, on the return voyage to England, Shovell and more than 1,400 others perished in a disastrous shipwreck off the Isles of Scilly.

Thomas Hopsonn enjoyed a naval command on 18 May 1688, when James II appointed him to the Bonaventure. This ship was part of the fleet sent to The Nore under Strickland to prevent the Dutch invasion. However, Hopsonn was one of the conspirators within the fleet who supported William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution.

Following the revolution, Hopsonn retained command of the Bonaventure and was part of the squadron that relieved the siege of Derry in June 1689. On 28 October 1689, he was posted to the York, and commanded that vessel during the battle of Beachy Head the following year. Hopsonn's immediate commander in the battle was Sir George Rooke, who formed a high opinion of his gallantry and was afterwards much associated with him. He commanded Royal Katherine for two months starting in August 1690, before moving to command the St Michael. It was aboard the latter that he followed Rooke in the battle of Barfleur on 19 May 1692. In the same year, he was promoted to become a captain in the foot guards on the recommendation of admiral Edward Russell.  read more

Code: 25380

940.00 GBP