Antique Arms & Militaria

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Original, Imperial Roman Gladius, A Legionary's Sword, 1st Century, Almost 2000 Years Old. Made And Used During The Reigns in Imperial Rome of the Emperors, Augustus, Claudius, Tiberius, Caligula & Nero

Original, Imperial Roman Gladius, A Legionary's Sword, 1st Century, Almost 2000 Years Old. Made And Used During The Reigns in Imperial Rome of the Emperors, Augustus, Claudius, Tiberius, Caligula & Nero

A spectacular and rare beauty, as is typical just the blade remains intact. In the world of collecting early weaponry a sword is defined as it’s blade, its hilt was separate often made of vulnerable woods and organic materials that do not survive the ravages of time.
Only the second such original ancient Roman sword of its type that we have seen in the past ten years.

An absolute iconic sword, in fact, probably the most famous design of sword of antiquity. There is nothing that symbolises the age of Ancient Rome more than the legionary’s gladius. From the most famous empire that has ever existed, an empire that has had a greater influence in the development of modern civilisation than any other. There is barely a single part of today’s world that does not utilise the ancient creations, ideas, and developments of Ancient Rome. From the time of Imperial Rome and the Emperors, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius and Nero. Effectively from the golden age of Rome, the pinnacle of its power, the central 300 years of the 900 years of the rise and fall of the Roman Republic and Empire, and it’s dominance of the Western world, North Africa and the Middle East. A fabulous double-edged sword with the typology classification of ‘Pompeii’ type, with parallel cutting edges, sharply graduating towards the triangular point, with close combat sword-to-sword impact battle nicks to the edges, and a long tang. The ‘Pompeii’ gladius was named by modern historians after the Roman town of Pompeii. This type of gladius was by far the most popular used type of them all. Four instances of the sword type were found in Pompeii, with others turning up in other locations. Gladii were two-edged for cutting and had a tapered point for stabbing during thrusting. A solid grip was provided by a knobbed hilt added on, possibly with ridges for the fingers. The hilt/grips were of organic material, mostly wood, which simply never survives two millennia. Blade strength was achieved by welding together strips, in which case the sword had a channel down the centre, or by fashioning a single piece of high-carbon steel, rhomboidal in cross-section. The owner's name was often engraved or punched on the blade.
This kind of sword was much more suitable than the earlier Mainz typology for the fight against the Germanic tribes, allowing the legionary to deliver equally successful blows by stabbing and chopping. The specimen in question presents a very elongated blade and it is possible that it was used as weapon from horseback, representing a sort of transitional type between the short gladius and the long cavalry spatha. Similar long Pompeii blades specimens have been found in the Barbaricum and in a military camp of Germania Inferior. After Caesar's preliminary low-scale invasions of Britain, the Romans invaded in force in 43 AD, forcing their way inland through several battles against British tribes, including the Battle of the Medway, the Battle of the Thames, the Battle of Caer Caradoc and the Battle of Mona. Following a general uprising in which the Britons sacked Colchester, St Albans and London the Romans suppressed the rebellion in the Battle of Watling Street and went on to push as far north as central Scotland in the Battle of Mons Graupius. Tribes in modern-day Scotland and Northern England repeatedly rebelled against Roman rule and two military bases were established in Britannia to protect against rebellion and incursions from the north, from which Roman troops built and manned Hadrian's Wall

On the continent, the extension of the Empire's borders beyond the Rhine hung in the balance for some time, with the emperor Caligula apparently poised to invade Germania in 39 AD, and Cnaeus Domitius Corbulo crossing the Rhine in 47 AD and marching into the territory of the Frisii and Chauci. Caligula's successor, Claudius, ordered the suspension of further attacks across the Rhine, setting what was to become the permanent limit of the Empire's expansion in this direction.
Although at first sight they seem more similar to later spathae swords of the Roman army, they are examples of the great variety of weaponry existing inside the Armies of Rome, and of the way in which its structure was able to adapt itself to its various military needs. This sword type also present
a noteworthy problem in regards of precise individual dating, because without a precise archaeological context, there use can range from the 1st to the 3rd century AD (such as specimens from Windisch, Zwammerdam). For references on this sword type see; Curle, J., A Roman Frontier Post and its People, the Fort of Newstead in the Parish of Melrose, Glasgow, 1911; Bishop, M. C. & Coulston, J.C.N., Roman military equipment, from the Punic wars to the fall of Rome, London, 1993; Antonucci, C., ‘The Praetorians, the bodyguard of the Emperor Trajan, 2nd cent. AD’, in Ancient Warrior,1, Stockport, 1994, pp.3ff.; Feugère, M., Weapons of the Romans, Port Stroud, 2002; Bishop, M. C. & Coulston, J.C.N., Roman military equipment, from the Punic wars to the fall of Rome, London, 2006; Miks, C., Studien zur Romischen Schwertbewaffnung in der Kaiserzeit, I-II Banden, Rahden, 2007; for very similar specimens see Miks, 2007, n.A792 (Windisch, length 64 cm); A821 (Zwammerdam, length 71cm); A302 (Hofstade Steenberg, length 64cm); A369 (Korytnica, length 76.2cm); A354 (Klein-Winternheim, length 67cm).
In the world of collecting early weaponry a sword is defined as it’s blade, it’s hilt was separate often made of vulnerable woods and materials that do not survive the ravages of time. You simply do not often see such rare and iconic original ancient swords used by one of the most famed empires in the world, during the period of one of the greatest eras in classical history, let alone have the opportunity to own one. This sword is 855 grams, 84cm (33") including tang. Fine condition for age. Complete with a complimentary display stand  read more

Code: 23516

11250.00 GBP

A Simply Wonderful Trojan War Period Full Length Bronze Sword Blade 28.75 Inches Long Circa 1200 B.C.

A Simply Wonderful Trojan War Period Full Length Bronze Sword Blade 28.75 Inches Long Circa 1200 B.C.

2nd millennium BC. A bronze sword with tapering long multi fullered blade, flat, tapered tang originally fitted with a likely organic hilt of possibly ivory or carved horn or wood. A sword that could have been traded with the Archean Greeks, the Mycenean Greeks the Trojan peoples and The Hitites.

The trade of Bronze Age weaponry followed trade routes that started in the the Assyrian Empire, East of Babylon, right through to the Mediterranean region, and all of empires and kingdoms in between. Also, all manner of Bronze Age utilitarian wares, personal adornments, and tools came from this famed bronze smithing region and their trading merchants.

In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta. The war is one of the most important events in Greek mythology and has been narrated through many works of Greek literature, most notably Homer's Iliad. The core of the Iliad (Books II – XXIII) describes a period of four days and two nights in the tenth year of the decade-long siege of Troy; the Odyssey describes the journey home of Odysseus, one of the war's heroes. Other parts of the war are described in a cycle of epic poems, which have survived through fragments. Episodes from the war provided material for Greek tragedy and other works of Greek literature, and for Roman poets including Virgil and Ovid.

The ancient Greeks believed that Troy was located near the Dardanelles and that the Trojan War was a historical event of the 13th or 12th century BC, but by the mid-19th century AD, both the war and the city were widely seen as non-historical. In 1868, however, the German archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann met Frank Calvert, who convinced Schliemann that Troy was a real city at what is now Hisarlik in Turkey. On the basis of excavations conducted by Schliemann and others, this claim is now accepted by most scholars.

Whether there is any historical reality behind the Trojan War remains an open question. Many scholars believe that there is a historical core to the tale, though this may simply mean that the Homeric stories are a fusion of various tales of sieges and expeditions by Mycenaean Greeks during the Bronze Age. Those who believe that the stories of the Trojan War are derived from a specific historical conflict usually date it to the 12th or 11th century BC, often preferring the dates given by Eratosthenes, 1194–1184 BC, which roughly correspond to archaeological evidence of a catastrophic burning of Troy VII, and the Late Bronze Age collapse. Legend has it that the war originated from a quarrel between the goddesses Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite, after Eris, the goddess of strife and discord, gave them a golden apple, sometimes known as the Apple of Discord, marked "for the fairest". Zeus sent the goddesses to Paris of Troy, who judged that Aphrodite, as the "fairest", should receive the apple. In exchange, Aphrodite made Helen, the most beautiful of all women and wife of Menelaus of Sparta, fall in love with Paris, who quit Sparta with her and returned to Troy. Menelaus's brother Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, led an expedition of Achaean troops to Troy and besieged the city for ten years because of Paris' insult. After the deaths of many heroes, including the Achaeans Achilles and Ajax, and the Trojans Hector and Paris, the city fell to the ruse of the Trojan Horse. The Achaeans slaughtered the Trojans (except for some of the women and children whom they kept or sold as slaves) and desecrated the temples, thus earning the gods' wrath. Few of the Achaeans returned safely to their homes and many founded colonies in distant shores. The Romans later traced their origin to Aeneas, Aphrodite's son and one of the Trojans, who was said to have led the surviving Trojans to modern-day Italy.

Most of our antiquities and artefacts are from 200 year past souvenir accumulations from British ‘Grand Tours’. Beautiful Items and antiquities were oft acquired in the 18th and early 19th century by British noblemen and women touring battle sites in Northern France and Italy, in fact most of Europe and the Middle East, on their so-called ‘Grand Tour’. They were often placed on display upon their return home, within the family’s ‘cabinet of curiosities’, within their country house. Some significant British stately homes had entire galleries displaying the treasures and artefacts gathered and purchased on such tours, and some tours lasted many years, and the accumulated souvenirs numbered in their hundreds or even thousands

As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.  read more

Code: 24764

2950.00 GBP

Original Roman Empire period, Copper Alloy, 2nd Century Signet Ring with Engraved Bird

Original Roman Empire period, Copper Alloy, 2nd Century Signet Ring with Engraved Bird

Henig type Xb ring. Wide oval bezel affixed to flattened shoulders engraved copper bronze alloy with gilt highlights. Almost identical to one found in the UK near Hadrian's Wall. That one was engraved to represent the Zaroastrian fire altar, or vessel of sprouting grains. The ring was important for displaying the Roman's status. For example Tiberius, who was after all left-handed according to Suetonius, thus displays a ring in his bronze portrait as the Pontifex Maximus:
So the rings were very important to tell from a glimpse of eye if a traveller was a citizen, an equites or a senator, or legionary. People sealed and signed letters with the rings and its falsification could bring death.

In ancient Rome they were used as signet rings, for the elite citizens and political leaders with power and wealth using them to sign documents by transferring their impression into a hot dripping of wax. At that point in history, there was no such thing as a written signature.

The fugitive slaves didn’t have rings but iron collars with texts like “If found, return me to X” which also helped to recognise them. The domesticus slaves (the ones that lived in houses) didn’t wore the collar but sometimes were marked. A ring discovered 50 years ago is now believed to possibly be the ring of Pontius Pilate himself, and it was the same copper-bronze form ring as is this one.  read more

Code: 24854

365.00 GBP

A Imperial Roman 1st Century Gladiator's Ring, Decorated With a Gladiator in Combat Holding Sword, or Flagellum and Shield

A Imperial Roman 1st Century Gladiator's Ring, Decorated With a Gladiator in Combat Holding Sword, or Flagellum and Shield

In copper bronze with excavated patination. Worn either by a higher ranking, possibly freed gladiator, or, possibly an owner of gladiators, the world famous combat slaves of Rome.

Classified by the seminal classification of ancient ring forms, by Dr. Martin Henig, as Ancient Roman, Henig type Xb.

This is only the fourth, original imperial gladiator's ring of this type, depicting a gladiator in combat stance, we have had in a decade or more, the last but one was museum restored from three broken pieces, this one is still in one sound piece.

From a collection of antiquities, swords daggers, and rings, that just arrived this week, in early July, many pieces sold for the part benefit of the Westminster Abbey fund, and the Metropolitan Museum fund

The wearing of the ring was the prerogative alone of Roman citizens or those of high rank and esteem, that some gladiators always aspired to but rarely achieved due to their short life span within their violent craft. However some did achieve such great success and were rewarded with riches, freedom and the right to wear the traditional Roman bronze status ring.

Engraved with a standing Gladiator, he is wearing, likely, a gladiators grilled front helmet, holding a shield in his left hand, and a sword or maybe trident in his right.

See photos 7 and 8 of a similar Gladiator's helmet as we can see the gladiator likely wears in this ring intaglio. The original helmet we show is made from bronze, and richly decorated with a gorgon's and a griffin's head, from the 1st Century AD, around the same age as this ring, and it was found at Pompeii.

Another picture in the gallery no 10 is of a well-preserved fresco, recently unearthed in Pompeii—the Roman city razed by Mount Vesuvius’ eruption in 79 A.D.—it depicts the final act of a gladiator fight: As one combatant begs for mercy, the victorious warrior awaits instructions on whether to kill or spare his opponent. The ring looks as if it depicts a portion of very similar scene in fact, the subject gladiator on the ring appears to be either injured or leaning back to avoid an opponent's weapon thrust

This fabulous ring,and it is a remarkable artefact of original Roman gladiator combat

Within the intaglio engraving the gladiator's right hand holds what appears to be some kind of weapon, possibly a sword or trident, possibly the same as in the Pompeii fresco.

A gladiator was an armed combatant who entertained audiences in the Roman Republic and Roman Empire in violent confrontations with other gladiators, wild animals, and condemned criminals. Some gladiators were volunteers who risked their lives and their legal and social standing by appearing in the arena. Most were despised as slaves, schooled under harsh conditions, socially marginalised, and segregated even in death.

Irrespective of their origin, gladiators offered spectators an example of Rome's martial ethics and, in fighting or dying well, they could inspire admiration and popular acclaim. They were celebrated in high and low art, and their value as entertainers was commemorated in precious and commonplace objects throughout the Roman world.

The origin of gladiatorial combat is open to debate. There is evidence of it in funeral rites during the Punic Wars of the 3rd century BC, and thereafter it rapidly became an essential feature of politics and social life in the Roman world. Its popularity led to its use in ever more lavish and costly games.

The gladiator games lasted for nearly a thousand years, reaching their peak between the 1st century BC and the 2nd century AD. Christians disapproved of the games because they involved idolatrous pagan rituals, and the popularity of gladiatorial contests declined in the fifth century, leading to their disappearance.

*Please bear in mind almost all original engraved Roman rings are engraved with scenes in the naive stylized form, and not intended to be a naturalistic interpretation as was usual in nobles gold seal rings, also their marble or bronze scuptures and statuary.  read more

Code: 24844

675.00 GBP

An Original Viking Warrior's Bronze Torc Arm Ring CIrca 800's in Viking Twisted Wirework Design

An Original Viking Warrior's Bronze Torc Arm Ring CIrca 800's in Viking Twisted Wirework Design

A fabulous Viking twisted wire bronze alloy arm ring bracelet. A most attractive and impressive original Viking bracelet

Knowledge about the arms and armour and body adornments such as bracelets, torcs, rings and pendants, of the Viking age is based on archaeological finds, pictorial representation, and to some extent on the accounts in the Norse sagas and Norse laws recorded in the 13th century. According to custom, all free Norse men were required to own weapons and were permitted to carry them all the time, and body adornments were a way to set one apart, the more successful in combat a warrior was was the greater his share of the looted booty, and this success could only be best shown by him in his body adornment, such as rings, torcs, wrist and arm bracelets, or pendants, and finally topped off with a wolf fur cloak. The arms he bore and his jewellery were indicative of a Viking's social status: a wealthy Viking had a complete ensemble of a helmet, shield, mail shirt, sword if his status was the highest otherwise spear or axe, and his body adornments. However, swords were rarely used in battle in the same quantity as axes, as few Vikings were of the status to own or carry a sword, A typical bondi (freeman) was more likely to fight with a spear and shield, and axe, and most also carried a seax as a utility knife and side-arm. Bows were used in the opening stages of land battles and at sea, but they tended to be considered less "honourable" than a melee weapon.

The warfare and violence of the Vikings were often motivated and fuelled by their beliefs in Norse religion, focusing on Thor and Odin, the gods of war and death. In combat, it is believed that the Vikings sometimes engaged in a disordered style of frenetic, furious fighting known as berserkergang, leading them to be termed berserkers. Such tactics may have been deployed intentionally by shock troops, and the berserk-state may have been induced through ingestion of materials with psychoactive properties, such as the hallucinogenic mushrooms, Amanita muscaria, or large amounts of alcohol. Perhaps the most common hand weapon among Vikings was the axe, swords were far more expensive to make, and only wealthy warriors could possibly afford them.

Vikings and Norse people wore arm rings (also known as Torcs) as a sign of their wealth and status, and as a sign of loyalty. An arm ring is a type of heavy jewellry that is worn around the upper or lower arm. Arm rings might made of precious metals such as gold or silver, but for combat bronze was more sustainable

Norse arm rings were usually given as gifts to mark special occasions such as births, weddings, or military victories. They were also sometimes used as currency. In some cases, arm rings were passed down from generation to generation as family heirlooms. Viking arm rings have been found at many old Viking locations.

The meaning of a Viking arm ring could vary depending on its owner. For some people, it may have been a symbol of their power and wealth. For others, it may have represented their family history or heritage.

Whatever the meaning of a Viking arm ring may have been, it is clear that these pieces of jewellery were important to the Norse people. Arm rings were more than just fashion accessories; they held significant value both socially and economically.

Just under 60 mm across. In its wearing life arm rings wether for wrist or upper arm could be expanded easily by hand in order to increase its size to fit the wrist or arm of the wearer at the time, but not today of course.

As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity  read more

Code: 24797

695.00 GBP

An Original & Superb Imperial Roman Bronze Ring, The Type Worn by the Praetorian Guard, Personal Guard of the Emperor 1st Century AD From the Time of Julio-Claudian Emperors, Augustus, Tiberious, Caligula, Claudius & Nero

An Original & Superb Imperial Roman Bronze Ring, The Type Worn by the Praetorian Guard, Personal Guard of the Emperor 1st Century AD From the Time of Julio-Claudian Emperors, Augustus, Tiberious, Caligula, Claudius & Nero

Founded by Emperor Augustus the Praetorian Guard were the personal guard of the Emperor, that answered to no one but him. However, the Praetorians notoriously assassinated 13 of their Roman Emperors that it was sworn to protect, and on one occasion they even auctioned off the emperors throne to the highest bidder. So, as the expressions goes, nobody's perfect.

1st century AD. An Imperial Roman heavy copper alloy bronze ring. The form of ring worn by the Praetorian Guard, being classified as Henig type 1, Classified by the seminal classification of ancient ring forms, by Dr. Martin Henig, and Geraud type 1b; From the Julio-Claudian dynasty (27 BC – AD 68).

The last example we had, around 3 years ago, but that was adorned with an engraving likely to denote higher rank of the wearer, this one is unadorned.

Most of our antiquities and artefacts are from 200 year past souvenir accumulations from British ‘Grand Tours’. Beautiful Items and antiquities were oft acquired in the 18th and early 19th century by British noblemen and women touring battle sites in Northern France and Italy, in fact most of Europe and the Middle East, on their so-called ‘Grand Tour’. They were often placed on display upon their return home, within the family’s ‘cabinet of curiosities’, within their country house. Some significant British stately homes had entire galleries displaying the treasures and artefacts gathered and purchased on such tours, and some tours lasted many years, and the accumulated souvenirs numbered in their hundreds or even thousands

The Praetorian Guard was a fixture of the imperial era, but their origins date back to groups of elite soldiers that protected generals during the Roman Republic. As early as the second century B.C., special units were selected to shadow famed Roman leaders such as Marc Antony, Scipio Africanus and Lucius Cornelius Sulla whenever they ventured into the field. Julius Caesar later enlisted his tenth legion as personal security, but the Praetorian Guard as we know it didn’t appear until shortly after Augustus became Rome’s first emperor in 27 B.C. After ascending to the throne, Augustus established his own imperial guards comprised of nine cohorts of 500 to 1,000 men each.

The unit would endure as a symbol of imperial might for over 300 years. By A.D. 23, it even operated out of its own fortress, the Castra Praetoria, located on the outskirts of Rome. The Praetorian Guard often handled crowd control at the Roman games, but they occasionally stepped into the arena and played an active role in the bloodshed. There is evidence that the Guard took part in gruesome wild beast hunts to demonstrate their combat prowess, and they played a notorious role in a “naumachia,” or staged sea battle, hosted by Emperor Claudius in A.D. 52. The spectacle saw as many as 19,000 men and some 100 boats clash in a mock naval engagement on the Fucine Lake. Most of the participants were prisoners and slaves, and the Praetorians, armed with catapults and ballistae, surrounded the battle on rafts to add to the mayhem and prevent any of the condemned from escaping.

The Praetorians’ may have been tasked with protecting the Roman Emperor, but they were also the single greatest threat to his life. The unit was a major player in the webs of deceit that characterized imperial Rome, and they were willing to slaughter and install new emperors when tempted by promises of money or power.
Disgruntled Praetorians famously engineered the assassination of Caligula and the selection of Claudius as his successor in A.D. 41. Among others, the Guard or their prefect also played a part in the murder of Commodus in 192, Caracalla in 217, Elagabalus in 222 and Pupienus and Balbinus in 238. In some cases, the Praetorians were partially responsible for both installing andmurdering a would-be emperor. Galba ascended the throne in A.D. 68 after winning the support of the Guard, only to be killed at their hands the following year after he neglected to properly reward them. Likewise, Emperor Pertinax was confirmed by the Praetorians in 193 and then slain just three months later when he tried to force them to accept new disciplinary measures.

In general the majority of rings recovered in provincial cities were made of bronze from local workshops. The most common alloy employed for the largest number of ornaments and with the greatest variety of shapes was brass, the alloy of copper and zinc. The high number of alloys with a different composition indicates that there was a significantly increased demand for jewellery similar in colour to precious metal, but cheaper and easy to produce..For examples see; Cf. Henkel, F., Die Römischen Fingerringe der Rheinlande und der Benachbarten Gebiete, Berlin, 1913, items 168, 202a,959 and 1785, for types.

Size R {UK}, a good comfortable wearable size, and sound heavy quality, and a remarkably smooth and exceptionally well preserved surface patina

Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading  read more

Code: 25082

495.00 GBP

An Fabulous Bronze and Iron Archemeanid Empire Sword From the Time of the Greco-Persian Wars of Xerxes the Great Against the Spartans at Thermopylae. The Very Type of Sword Actually Used As Depicted in The Movie 300 Spartans

An Fabulous Bronze and Iron Archemeanid Empire Sword From the Time of the Greco-Persian Wars of Xerxes the Great Against the Spartans at Thermopylae. The Very Type of Sword Actually Used As Depicted in The Movie 300 Spartans

To place this wonderful historical piece in a modern context. If one saw the incredible movie ‘300 Spartans’, this is exactly the same kind of sword that would have been used in that extraordinary battle, and into the period of the greatest Empire ever known of Alexander the Great.
It is 7th century to 6th century BC, and was a most rare and incredibly valuable weapon of war during that time, utilising as it does a combination of steel and bronze, as iron steel was a most rare, valuable and highly prized metal in the early ancient Bronze Age period. This wonderful sword would likely have been used and held by warriors of nobility for likely several hundred years.
A complete sword, of both blade and hilt, with leaf-shaped russetted iron blade, double-waisted grip with transverse collar, the pommel formed as two crescentic iron spayed lobes, the hilt clad with bronze. Approx 635 grams, 19.25 inches. very good condition hilt for age. Approximately 2500 years old, Achaemenid Empire era, 550 bc to 330 bc From the the Greco-Persian War, such as includes the iconic battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Plataea, up to the time of Alexander the Great. This wonderful antiquity, from one of the most eventful and ground breaking periods of classical history, is in amazing condition and beautifully decorated 6th-4th century BC. A bronze long dagger with narrow lentoid-section blade, collared grip with crescentic ears to the pommel. By the 7th century BC, the Persians had settled in the south-western portion of the Iranian Plateau in the region of Persis, which came to be their heartland. From this region, Cyrus the Great advanced to defeat the Medes, Lydia, and the Neo-Babylonian Empire, establishing the Achaemenid Empire. The Ionian Greek Revolt in 499 BC, and associated revolts in Aeolis, Doris, Cyprus and Caria, were military rebellions by several regions of Asia Minor against Persian rule, lasting from 499 to 493 BC. At the heart of the rebellion was the dissatisfaction of the Greek cities of Asia Minor with the tyrants appointed by Persia to rule them, along with the individual actions of two Milesian tyrants, Histiaeus and Aristagoras. In 499 BC, the then tyrant of Miletus, Aristagoras, launched a joint expedition with the Persian satrap Artaphernes to conquer Naxos, in an attempt to bolster his position in Miletus (both financially and in terms of prestige). The mission was a debacle, and sensing his imminent removal as tyrant, Aristagoras chose to incite the whole of Ionia into rebellion against the Persian king Darius the Great. In 490 BC the Persian forces were defeated by the Athenians at the Battle of Marathon and Darius would die before having the chance to launch an invasion of Greece. The Battle of Marathon took place in 490 BC, during the first Persian invasion of Greece. It was fought between the citizens of Athens, aided by Plataea, and a Persian force commanded by Datis and Artaphernes. The battle was the culmination of the first attempt by Persia, under King Darius I, to subjugate Greece. The Greek army decisively defeated the more numerous Persians, marking a turning point in the Greco-Persian Wars. Xerxes I (485–465 BC, "Hero Among Kings"), son of Darius I, vowed to complete the job. He organized a massive invasion aiming to conquer Greece. His army entered Greece from the north, meeting little or no resistance through Macedonia and Thessaly, but was delayed by a small Greek force for three days at Thermopylae. A simultaneous naval battle at Artemisium was tactically indecisive as large storms destroyed ships from both sides. The battle was stopped prematurely when the Greeks received news of the defeat at Thermopylae and retreated. The battle was a strategic victory for the Persians, giving them uncontested control of Artemisium and the Aegean Sea.

Following his victory at the Battle of Thermopylae, Xerxes sacked the evacuated city of Athens and prepared to meet the Greeks at the strategic Isthmus of Corinth and the Saronic Gulf. In 480 BC the Greeks won a decisive victory over the Persian fleet at the Battle of Salamis and forced Xerxes to retire to Sardis. The land army which he left in Greece under Mardonius retook Athens but was eventually destroyed in 479 BC at the Battle of Plataea. The final defeat of the Persians at Mycale encouraged the Greek cities of Asia to revolt, and the Persians lost all of their territories in Europe; Macedonia once again became independent. Alexander the Great, an avid admirer of Cyrus the Great, conquered most of the empire by 330 BC. Upon Alexander's death, most of the empire's former territory came under the rule of the Ptolemaic Kingdom and Seleucid Empire, in addition to other minor territories which gained independence at that time. The Iranian elites of the central plateau reclaimed power by the second century BC under the Parthian Empire

See Khorasani, M.M., Arms and Armour from Iran. The Bronze Age to the End of the Qajar Period, Tübingen, 2006, p.384, no.20, for similar. As with all our items it comes complete with our certificate of authenticity.  read more

Code: 23515

3950.00 GBP

A Very Good & Scarce 1100 years old Viking Period Short Javelin Spear Head, Approx 900 AD

A Very Good & Scarce 1100 years old Viking Period Short Javelin Spear Head, Approx 900 AD

Medially ridged leaf shaped blade, with a long tapering spiked tang. Although not as glamorous as the sword, the spear was in every sense the definitive weapon of the Viking Age and used as the primary weapon of combat by almost every warrior. This form of long throwing javelin spear has an iron socket spike at the base, that in order to create a javelin, its bottom spike would be driven into a suitable haft by around 3.5 inches, up to the end of the socket, and this would thus create a most devastating long distance throwing weapon of warfare. Decorated spearheads inlaid with precious metals prove that in the Viking Age spears were not seen as the poor man's choice and one has only to look at the representations of warriors from the illuminated manuscripts of the era to quickly come to the conclusion that the use of the spear was ubiquitous. Swords are considered a most valuable historical find, as is a same era spear, however, a similar condition surviving Viking era sword would cost today well over 10,000 pounds, so the cost of this spear by comparison is very good value indeed. A fine example of a 10th century spear that can be found in England, that came from Viking invaders, who used such spears from Eastern Europe, all Scandinavia, Northern Europe, Central Europe and Britain. Many of the Anglo-Saxon phrases used to describe both battle and warrior help to underline the importance of the spear. In Vlusp (from the Norse Poetic Edda) line 24 onwards -we read :

Vápnum sínum skal-a maðr velli á
feti ganga framar,
því at óvíst er at vita,
nær verðr á vegum úti geirs of þörf guma

let fly a spear, hurled it over the host;
that was still the first war in the world,
the palisade surrounding the sir's stronghold was breached
by the Vanir battle-magic, as they strode the plain.
During the War between the sir and the Vanir, Odinn threw a javelin into the Vanir host to signal the commencement of hostilities. The practice of symbolically throwing a spear into the enemy ranks at the start of a battle was sometimes used in historic clashes, to seek Odinn’s blessing. 17.5 inches long overall. Part of an original medieval collection we have just acquired, of Viking and early British relics of warfare from ancient battle sites recovered up to 220 years ago. Almost every iron weapon that has survived today from this era is now in a fully russetted condition, as is this one, because only the swords of kings, that have been preserved in national or Royal collections are today still in a good state and condition. 205mm long.
Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading  read more

Code: 23741

475.00 GBP

A Stunning Collection Of Original Victorian British Regimental Heavy Dragoons and Dragoon Guards Cavalry Helmets & Armour Just Arrived This Week!. Including a Full Cuirass Armour & Helmet {pre 1953} of the King’s Mounted Bodyguard.

A Stunning Collection Of Original Victorian British Regimental Heavy Dragoons and Dragoon Guards Cavalry Helmets & Armour Just Arrived This Week!. Including a Full Cuirass Armour & Helmet {pre 1953} of the King’s Mounted Bodyguard.

Mostly now added this weekend to the site with photographs etc.. please scroll down the pages to view them in all their beautiful glory!.

They are all in fabulous condition, and the best original examples of their kind we have seen in years {in, or out of museums}. A couple of slightly worn horsehair plumes are being refurbished by the late Queen’s former military helmet plume maker.

The British Dragoon Guards Regiments;

1st King's Dragoon Guards (1746, from The King's Own Regiment of Horse); amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards (1959)
2nd Queen's Dragoon Guards (1746, from The Princess of Wales's Own Regiment of Horse); redesignated 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays) (1872); redesignated The Queen's Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards) (1921); amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards (1959)
3rd Dragoon Guards (1747, from 4th Regiment of Horse); redesignated 3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards (1765); amalgamated to form 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards (1922); redesignated 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards) (1928); amalgamated with Royal Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) to form Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys) (1971)
4th (Royal Irish) Dragoon Guards (1788, from 1st Irish Horse); redesignated 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards (1921); amalgamated to form 4th/7th Dragoon Guards (1922); redesignated 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards (1936); amalgamated to form Royal Dragoon Guards (1992)
5th Dragoon Guards (1788, from 2nd Irish Horse); redesignated 5th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards (1804); redesignated 5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) (1920); amalgamated with The Inniskillings (6th Dragoons) to form 5th/6th Dragoons (1922); redesignated 5th Inniskilling Dragoon Guards (1927); redesignated 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards (1935); amalgamated to form Royal Dragoon Guards (1992)
6th Dragoon Guards (The Carabiniers) (1788, from 3rd Irish Horse); redesignated The Carabiniers (6th Dragoon Guards) (1920); amalgamated to form 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards (1922)
7th (The Princess Royal's) Dragoon Guards (1788, from 4th Irish Horse); redesignated 7th Dragoon Guards (Princess Royal's) (1921); amalgamated to form 4th/7th Dragoon Guards (1922)
The Dragoon Guards regiments were converted to armoured cars and tanks during the 1930s. There are still three Dragoon Guards regiments in the British Army:

Seniority
The Regiments of Horse that were converted to Dragoon Guards took precedence over all other cavalry regiments of the Line, which were at the time exclusively dragoons. As the senior regiments, they could not take numbers sequential with those of the existing dragoon regiments, so they needed a new title and numbering system. Hence they were termed Dragoon Guards, the guards appellation giving them higher prestige, and allowing them to be numbered in their own sequence
Army practice it’s likely that different coloured plumes, other than their regular colours, relate to Trumpeters and Farriers (as still practised in the Household Cavalry).

Ref;
The Household Cavalry Regiment, The Life Guards (right) and The Blues and Royals (left) forming part of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth's funeral procession (Picture: MOD).  read more

Code: 25330

Price
on
Request

A Superb and Exemplary Original Service Issue Victorian Helmet of the 3rd {Prince of Wales} Regiment of Dragoon Guards

A Superb and Exemplary Original Service Issue Victorian Helmet of the 3rd {Prince of Wales} Regiment of Dragoon Guards

A Beautiful helmet of brass and white metal, with garter badge of the 3DG, overall in superb condition with chinscales. One of the best surviving examples one can see in our out of a museum

The 3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards was a cavalry regiment in the British Army, first raised in 1685 as the Earl of Plymouth's Regiment of Horse. It was renamed as the 3rd Regiment of Dragoon Guards in 1751 and the 3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards in 1765.
From 1809 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-15), it was in the Peninsula, serving at Talavera (1809), Busaco (1810), Torres Vedras (1810), Albuera (1811), Badajoz (1811), Ciudad Rodrigo (1812), Salamanca (1812), Burgos (1812) and Vitoria (1813).
The regiment then spent most of the 19th century on home service. It charged rioters in Bristol in 1831 and was kept in Ireland on garrison duties during the Crimean War (1854-56).

However, it did deploy to India from 1857 to 1868, and from 1884 to 1895. In 1868, it was also the only British cavalry unit to participate in the Abysinnia Expedition (1867-68).

The regiment was deployed to the Boer War (1899-1902) from 1901 to 1902, taking part in the anti-guerrilla operations in the Transvaal and Orange Free State. It then spent time in Ireland, England and Egypt on garrison duties.

The 3rd Dragoon Guards arrived on the Western Front in October 1914. It remained there for the entire First World War (1914-18), taking part in many engagements including the first and second battles of Ypres (1914 and 1915), Loos (1915), Arras (1917), Cambrai (1917), St Quentin (1918) and Amiens (1918).

British Dragoon Guards Regiments
1st King's Dragoon Guards (1746, from The King's Own Regiment of Horse); amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards (1959)
2nd Queen's Dragoon Guards (1746, from The Princess of Wales's Own Regiment of Horse); redesignated 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays) (1872); redesignated The Queen's Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards) (1921); amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards (1959)
3rd Dragoon Guards (1747, from 4th Regiment of Horse); redesignated 3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards (1765); amalgamated to form 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards (1922); redesignated 3rd Carabiniers (Prince of Wales's Dragoon Guards) (1928); amalgamated with Royal Scots Greys (2nd Dragoons) to form Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys) (1971)
4th (Royal Irish) Dragoon Guards (1788, from 1st Irish Horse); redesignated 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards (1921); amalgamated to form 4th/7th Dragoon Guards (1922); redesignated 4th/7th Royal Dragoon Guards (1936); amalgamated to form Royal Dragoon Guards (1992)
5th Dragoon Guards (1788, from 2nd Irish Horse); redesignated 5th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards (1804); redesignated 5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) (1920); amalgamated with The Inniskillings (6th Dragoons) to form 5th/6th Dragoons (1922); redesignated 5th Inniskilling Dragoon Guards (1927); redesignated 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards (1935); amalgamated to form Royal Dragoon Guards (1992)
6th Dragoon Guards (The Carabiniers) (1788, from 3rd Irish Horse); redesignated The Carabiniers (6th Dragoon Guards) (1920); amalgamated to form 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards (1922)
7th (The Princess Royal's) Dragoon Guards (1788, from 4th Irish Horse); redesignated 7th Dragoon Guards (Princess Royal's) (1921); amalgamated to form 4th/7th Dragoon Guards (1922)
The Dragoon Guards regiments were converted to armoured cars and tanks during the 1930s. There are still three Dragoon Guards regiments in the British Army:

No liner, the regular plume would be black and red. Army practice it’s likely that different coloured plumes, other than their regular colours, relate to Trumpeters and Farriers (as still practised in the Household Cavalry). A very light and small amount of denting to the skull.  read more

Code: 25326

1850.00 GBP