Antique Arms & Militaria

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A Very Fine British ‘Brown Bess’ India Pattern Infantry Musket, Of The Napoleonic Wars Period, Circa 1810. For Over One Hundred Years The British ‘Brown Bess’ Was The Most Famed and Feared Musket In The World. No Army In The World Failed To Respect Them

A Very Fine British ‘Brown Bess’ India Pattern Infantry Musket, Of The Napoleonic Wars Period, Circa 1810. For Over One Hundred Years The British ‘Brown Bess’ Was The Most Famed and Feared Musket In The World. No Army In The World Failed To Respect Them

Facing a volley of several hundred or even thousands of them, fired in the enemies direction, repeated every few seconds, must have been a terrifying experience, never to be forgotten should they, by sheer luck, survive their awesome power. A demonstration of fire power that it could only be compared to, was British Artillery cannon fire.

In superb condition for age. The lock bears the ordnance ‘crown 2’ inspection stamp of Richard Duce {Crown Inspector from 1797 to 1818} universally seen on the muskets given over to the British ordnance for issue for line regiments in the Napoleonic Wars.
One of the India Pattern muskets likely turned over by the East India Co. army to the Board of Ordnance during the Napoleonic wars, due to the urgent need for arms to counter Napoleon's massive armament reserve. The musket was the standard weapon issued to the British soldier throughout the 18th and early-19th centuries. It would be the India Pattern musket that would play a central and pivotal role in the wars against Revolutionary and Napoleonic France.

By the end of the American Revolutionary War in 1783, the British Army was armed with the Pattern 1777 Long Land and Pattern 1779(S) Short Land musket. The ‘short land’ was a musket made to the strict quality guidelines of the Board of Ordnance, and was characterised by its 42 in barrel. After the war the expectation was for a period of peace, a time when the need for Ordnance materials would be low, so the standing contracts for the Pattern 1777 and the Pattern 1779(S) musket were cancelled. Parliament was not prepared to fund equipment it deemed unnecessary, so financial retrenchment was the order of the day. Parliament is consistent in it repeated inclination to repeat over and over again its failure to grasp the realities of the most painful of lessons from history. Never being prepared for war makes it near inevitable, and being constantly prepared for war, ironically, makes it far less likely. The fundamental tenet of invasion and conquest, like bullying in the school playground is the same; the little unarmed guy gets crushed, the big, well protected guy, respected.

The world changed in 1793, a mere 10 years after the loss of the American colonies. Britain found itself once again at war, this time with Revolutionary France. An army now reduced in size to an authorized strength of only 44,432 men had to be expanded rapidly, along with the local militia and volunteer forces. The call for muskets was huge. Indeed, in 1793 the total stock of muskets in armouries around Britain, including the central arsenal at the Tower of London, was around 60,000. The stocks held in French arsenals amounted to over 700,000.

Something needed to be done. At first the Board of Ordnance tried to ramp up production of the Short Land Pattern muskets by engaging new contractors. Yet despite producing over 31,000 muskets in 1793 the numbers were still woefully inadequate for the expanding forces.

The Board of Ordnance had to fill the gap. They did this by ordering 10,000 muskets from the Birmingham gun trade and 10,000 from their usual emergency suppliers in Liege, Belgium. However this was still not enough, especially as the private contractors in both Birmingham and London were hard at work fulfilling orders for the private trade and for the East India Company, one of the biggest private purchasers of military arms. To begin to solve this lack of supply the Master General of the Ordnance, the Duke of Richmond, suggested to the government that they persuade the East India Company to sell their stocks of muskets to the government and also to agree not to place any further orders until the Ordnance's requirements were met.

The duke wrote to the Home Secretary, Henry Dundas, on the matter. As Chairman of the Board of Control of the East India Company Dundas had earlier been instrumental in securing parliamentary approval for the renewal of the East India Company's monopoly. The duke stated that he was: 'aware how unpleasant it must be to take such a step, and to deliver out to our troops these East India Company muskets, but ... the least important must give way to the most; and you will be best able to judge whether the East India Company can admit of a delay in respect of theses arms. And altho' they might not be quite so perfect as ours, they undoubtedly must be serviceable ones, and such as the new Raised Corps must put up with on the current Emergency.'

This suggestion was met with agreement, and the idea of introducing the East India Company's arms into British Army service was conceived. By the end of 1794 the East India Company had delivered 29,920 muskets into government stores, all that they could spare. Indeed transactions for East India Company muskets would continue throughout the duration of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars. By 1815, the East India Company had sold the Board of Ordnance at least 142,970 small arms.

The musket that the East India Company supplied was one originally designed by General Lawrence for East India Company service, altered and simplified by Lieutenant Colonel Edward Windus in 1771. The musket in Company service became known as the 'Windus' pattern. In 1795, the Board of Ordnance began to order 'India Pattern' muskets on its own account and by 1797 it officially adopted the musket as the Model 1793 and began to place substantial orders for it with the Birmingham gun trade.

The Model 1793 India Pattern musket was standardized by the Board of Ordnance in 1797, taking account of its comparable cheapness, simplicity of design and ease of manufacture. By the end of 1797, the Birmingham gun trade was able to deliver some 72,000 muskets to the government proof house at Bagot Street. The success of this model was self evident, along with its slightly modified successor the Model 1809 India Pattern. They produced at an average price of 18 shillings and 5 pence (roughly £3,000 in today's money).

The Brown Bess musket was the standard weapon of the British infantry for more than a century. Soldiers on both sides of the War of 1812 employed it in battle, staring down its barrel at opponents across distances of less than a hundred yards.

Flintlock musket
The Brown Bess musket was the standard weapon of the British for more than a century.
British foot soldiers marched into battle with this musket—nicknamed “Brown Bess”—for more than 100 years. British redcoats used the Brown Bess to fight the War of Independence in the colonies, and many of their opponents in the Americans’ Continental army used it as well. British soldiers fighting in the Napoleonic wars carried it into battle, and it was the principal firearm used by the infantrymen who fought the War of 1812.

The Brown Bess had several distinctive features. It was a large-calibre weapon: the bullet it fired was a lead ball up to three-quarters of an inch in diameter, three times the diameter of a modern .22-caliber rifle round. The inside of its barrel was smooth: unlike more accurate “rifled” muskets used by the famous rifle regiments, the Brown Bess had a smooth bore with no grooves to make its fire more accurate. Soldiers loaded the musket through the muzzle, which meant that each bullet had to be forced down a longer than three foot barrel before firing. Even trained soldiers could only launch two or three shots per minute.

Because the weapon was slow to load and relatively inaccurate (experienced soldiers generally estimated its range between 50 and 100 yards), armies developed tactics that helped compensate for its shortcomings. The limitations of smoothbore muskets like the Brown Bess forced units employ “linear tactics,” in which a hundreds of soldiers stood in neat lines, shoulder-to-shoulder and out in the open. While such tactics appear decidedly unstealthy to twenty-first century eyes, they proved essential on the battlefields of all the conflicts which Britain was involved.
There, stealth was a low priority. Packing the men into blocs allowed officers to coordinate their troops’ fire into synchronized volleys. Firing a hundred guns in the same direction at once helped ensure that at least some, often most of the inaccurate musket balls found their targets. And grouping the men into neat lines out in the open helped commanders ensure that few of their troops gave in to the natural instinct to flee.

Of course, packing troops into blocks and fighting in the open required tremendous discipline from the individual soldiers. Infantrymen had to stand exposed to enemy fire as they loaded and fired their own muskets. And in some situations, soldiers learned the grisly dangers of fighting in lines—as at the Battle of New Orleans in the 1812 war, where American artillery attacked the exposed British formations with devastating effect.

The last photo in the gallery shows a photograph of one section of the collection in the museum of Waterloo, taken in around 1900, showing all the weapons of Waterloo en situ, including all the protagonists {British, French, Prussian and Belgian muskets, swords, pistols, armour uniforms, etc}. The museum was founded and owned by a veteran of the 7th Hussars that fought.

Overall in super condition, signs of combat use as to be expected, with some small carved military marking to the butt stock  read more

Code: 25208

3450.00 GBP

A Signally Fine and Beautiful, Brass Cannon Barrel Blunderbuss, Revolutionary War Period Circa 1775. It Would Be Difficult To Find A More Handsome & Better Looking Example

A Signally Fine and Beautiful, Brass Cannon Barrel Blunderbuss, Revolutionary War Period Circa 1775. It Would Be Difficult To Find A More Handsome & Better Looking Example

A very fine example with finest juglans regia walnut stock with a truly exceptional natural aged patina, fine brass furniture, finely engraved throughout. An acanthus leaf form finail trigger guard, and brass cannon barrel with Tower proofs. Excellent crisp action. It is typical of the superior private purchase British Naval and ship's blunderbuss . Although made and used from the Revolutionary War it was used for its same purpose right through the Napoleonic Wars.

Brass blunderbusses were naval enforcers in war and peace. Their powerful, smooth-bore barrels were very destructive at close range. They are easy to load and fairly easy to repair, and much used by the Royal Navy during the Revolution.

With these guns at its command, and its superior fleet with commanders like Nelson, it is little wonder that Britain ruled the waves for many generations. The "Sea Service," as the British Navy was called, continued to be the world's most powerful maritime force for two centuries.

The blunderbuss, which takes its name from the German term Donderbuschse (thunder gun) is a short-barrelled firearm with a flared muzzle that made its appearance in the late 16th century. Often associated with the Pilgrims, the blunderbuss was still relatively unknown in the early 17th century. Originally intended for military purposes, these arms can be traced to 1598, when Germany's Henrich Thielman applied for a patent for a shoulder arm designed for shipboard use to repel enemy boarders. The blunderbuss quickly became popular with the Dutch and English navies. England's growing maritime power seems to have fuelled production of these bell-barrel arms, which were useful during close-in engagements between warships by enabling marines clinging to ship's rigging to use them against the gun crews of opposing vessels. The barrels and furniture of the blunderbuss were typically made from brass, and stocks were most commonly made from walnut. Other, less robust woods were sometimes used, but their tendency to shatter ensured that walnut would remain in widespread use as a stocking material.
The blunderbuss played a role during the English Civil War of 1642-48, and these arms were widely used as a personal defence arm in England during the Commonwealth Period. The lack of an organised system of law enforcement at that time, coupled with the growing threat posed by highwaymen, placed the burden of protecting life and property in the hands of honest citizens. Although some blunderbusses bore the royal cipher of the Sovereign, they typically did not feature the Broad Arrow identifying government ownership or the markings of the Board of Ordnance.

Several brass- and iron-barrelled blunderbusses were captured from the forces of Lord Cornwallis upon the latter's surrender to the Continental Army at Yorktown, Virginia in the final land campaign of the American Revolution
A similar blunderbuss around the same size, is on display in the Cody Firearms Museum, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, in Cody, Wyoming, from the Winchester Arms Collection.

This blunderbuss is of the so-called "cannon mouth" pattern. It is typical of the British Naval blunderbuss and dates from circa 1770. This type of weapon fires a multitude of shot about .25 inch in diameter. John Steele was maker in Glasshouse Yard, London, and recorded there in 1767.

The Blunderbuss (born of the Dutch word "Donderbus", appropriately meaning "Thunder Pipe" or "Thunder Gun") came to prominence in the early part of the 18th Century (1701-1800) and was more akin to the modern day shotgun than a "long gun" musket or heavy pistol of the time. As such, she excelled in close-in fighting, be it within the confines of naval warfare or walled nature of the urban environment, where her spread of shot could inflict maximum damage to targets at close ranges. Its manageable size, coupled with its spread shot, ensured some level of accuracy for even the novice user and its appearance was rather intimidating to those unfortunate enough to be staring down the business end. As with modern firearms, the Blunderbuss also made for an excellent security-minded weapon and soon found popularity amongst all matter of operators - military, civilian and, of course, criminal parties - by the middle of the 1700s.

Even George Washington championed the Blunderbuss for Continental Army "Dragoon" units of the burgeoning American military as opposed to the carbine this being nothing more than a full-featured long gun of lesser overall length, proving suitable for horse-mounted handling

The blunderbuss has a 14 inch barrel and 29.5 inches long overall. The fore stock on the outside has a small sliver lacking.

As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables  read more

Code: 25209

3450.00 GBP

A Sublime Napoleonic Ist Empire French Superior Officer’s Blue & Gilt Officer’s Sword in the Mameluke Style, With Finest Deluxe Grade Chiselled Decor. We Always Try Our Utmost To Offer The Finest or Most Intriguing Pieces We Can From History

A Sublime Napoleonic Ist Empire French Superior Officer’s Blue & Gilt Officer’s Sword in the Mameluke Style, With Finest Deluxe Grade Chiselled Decor. We Always Try Our Utmost To Offer The Finest or Most Intriguing Pieces We Can From History

With copper mercurial gilt hilt and chequered polished horn grip original gilt scabbard with helmeted Minerva head mounts, twin ring belt fittings with its original, multi looped hanging belt chains, with spring catches.
Finely engraved blue and gilt blade.

Napoleon's Egypt Campaign, that ended in 1801, many Napoleonic officer's adopted the so-called oriental mounted swords, modelled on the Mameluke taken by him from Murad Bey, commander of the Mamelukes, which he holds in his Egypt portrait captured from the Egyptian Marmalukes {see gallery} that eventually became part of Napoleons Imperial Garde.
These swords, in their turn, were captured by the British and similarly adopted as a form of highly favoured officers sword. In fact the mamaluke sabre became the British General's pattern sword that is still in use today. Several of these specific swords were part of a Sotheby's Napoleonic Wars auction in Monaco in 1990, titled "Belles Armes Anciennes Casques et Objects Militaires". The last photo in the gallery is of Joachim Napoleon Murat, King of Naples, brother of Napoleon's Mameluke sword, somewhat similar to our sword, and all based on the sword of Napoleon from Murad Bey.

In May of 1804 Napoleon established the French Empire and with it he brought back the title of Marshal of France, also known as Marshal of the Empire at this time. Abolished by the National Convention in 1793, the title of Marshal of France was officially a civilian appointment but reserved for experienced generals. It was an honor to become a marshal and the marshals received higher pay and privileges. Napoleon wished to gain legitimacy in the eyes of Europe since other nations had the rank of field marshal, and he wished to reward and ensure the loyalty of the generals to his empire and thus they wore such swords of this quality and beauty.

One of his greatest marshals to wear such a sword was Marshal
Marshal of the Empire
Étienne Macdonald
duc de Tarente
Étienne Jacques-Joseph-Alexandre Macdonald. During the spring of 1810, Marshal Macdonald was sent to Spain to take command of the Army of Catalonia. While there he won at Ververa, but in 1811 he fell ill and returned to Paris again. In 1812 Macdonald was given command of the X Corps of the Grande Armée for the campaign against Russia. Macdonald's corps missed most of the fighting of 1812 due to being ordered to hold the left flank, but also due to his command being primarily composed of Prussian and German soldiers, with only his headquarters staff being French. Macdonald's corps laid siege to Riga in August, but they lifted the siege in December during the retreat, just in time for the majority of his force to defect away from the French side due to Prussian nationalism.

Napoleon needed experienced commanders for the campaigns of 1813, and in April of that year Macdonald was given command of the XI Corps. He won at Mersebourg and then commanded the right at the Battle of Lützen. Macdonald continued to lead his men into action, winning at Bischofswerda and then commanding the right at the Battle of Bautzen. That August he was placed in charge of multiple army corps but was then beaten by General Blucher at the Katzbach. Nevertheless, Macdonald continued to serve, and he fought at Leipzig , where after the bridge was blown early he had to swim the Elster River to escape capture. After surviving that escape unlike his fellow marshal Poniatowski, Macdonald resumed his command and then fought at Hanau.

Marshal Macdonald served during the defense of France of 1814, initially defending the Rhine but then being forced to fall back to Meaux. That February he fought at Mormant and Ferté-sur-Aube and then in March he fought at Provins and Saint-Dizier. By Napoleon's side, Macdonald along with Marshal Ney convinced Napoleon that he should give up the war and abdicate in favor of his son, Napoleon II. Macdonald, Ney, and Caulaincourt were then sent to negotiate with the Allies, but ultimately they were unable to secure the throne for Napoleon's son. When Macdonald returned to Napoleon to deliver the terms of surrender, Napoleon gave him the sword of Murad Bey, the Mameluke leader that he had defeated in Egypt.

Minerva, whose helmeted face is depicted and seen on the scabbard mounts, is the Roman goddess of wisdom, justice, law, victory, and the sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy. Minerva is not a patron of violence such as Mars, but of strategic warfare.

The blades scabbard has some inside denting at the base, and the blade has some natural age wear to the blue and gilt. Of course this sword’s original owner is now unknown, as none of its history was recorded or saved, however, once accurately known, a sword such as this could be valued anything from treble, to one hundred times its current price, simply depending on how famed he was then or now, or, how important he was to Napoleon and his campaigns. Marshal Nay’s sword for example could easily be valued from one to several million pounds.  read more

Code: 25207

5900.00 GBP

A Most Scarce French Marine Flintlock M.1786 / An.IX 1800's Carbine. A French Sea Service Musket Carbine of the Napoleonic Ships of the Line

A Most Scarce French Marine Flintlock M.1786 / An.IX 1800's Carbine. A French Sea Service Musket Carbine of the Napoleonic Ships of the Line

A most scarce sea service gun, made by the French imperial arsenals in Belgium. The main difference between this and the standard French Army An IX {year 9} carbine is that the Navy carbine’s centre band was brass and the Army’s was iron, brass not rusting at sea. These carbines were usually issued to sharpshooters manning the upper platforms of French warships, and it might well have been a carbine of this pattern that was used to shoot Admiral Nelson.

This is a version of French M.1786 carbine musket, which was shorter and lighter than the earlier issued pattern.
After some slight modifications, the weapon was distributed to various ships of the line in the Navy, with two brass barrel bands, and to hussar/ cavalry units, the cavalry versions would be supplied with a large sling swivel bar fitted to the near side of the carbine, combined with one steel, and one brass barrel slide. Barrel underside stamped G* by French inspector, Joseph Guichard, his An IX inspector stamp M1786/ Marine garnitures, 1803-5. Guichard was usually based at St. Etienne.

Napoleonic Belgium 1799-1814

Liège was the home of the fourth largest arms manufacturer in Napoleons period known as the 1st Empire. Between 1798 and 1813, the Belgian departments furnished over 200,000 troops and sailors, about 6 percent of the population, for Napoleon's armed forces.

The Battle of Trafalgar, (October 21, 1805), was a naval engagement of the Napoleonic Wars, which established British naval supremacy for more than 100 years; it was fought west of Cape Trafalgar, Spain, between Cádiz and the Strait of Gibraltar. A fleet of 33 ships (18 French and 15 Spanish) under Admiral Pierre de Villeneuve fought a British fleet of 27 ships under Admiral Horatio Nelson.

Nelson was outnumbered, with 27 British ships of the line to 33 allied ships including the largest warship in either fleet, the Spanish Santísima Trinidad. To address this imbalance, Nelson sailed his fleet directly at the allied battle line's flank, hoping to break the line into pieces. Villeneuve had worried that Nelson might attempt this tactic but, for various reasons, had made no plans for this eventuality. The plan worked almost perfectly; Nelson's columns split the Franco-Spanish fleet in three, isolating the rear half from Villeneuve's flag aboard Bucentaure. The allied vanguard sailed off while it attempted to turn around, giving the British temporary superiority over the remainder of their fleet. In the ensuing fierce battle 20 allied ships were lost, while the British lost none.

Nelson's own HMS Victory led the front column and was almost knocked out of action. Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during the battle, and died shortly before it ended. Villeneuve was captured along with his flagship Bucentaure. He attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. The senior Spanish fleet officer, Admiral Federico Gravina, escaped with the remnant of the Franco-Spanish fleet (a third of the original number of ships); he died five months later of wounds sustained during the battle.

The victory confirmed the naval supremacy Britain had established during the course of the eighteenth century, and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy.  read more

Code: 25206

3450.00 GBP

A Superb, Really Rare, French, Napoleonic Short Sea Service Boarding Pistol. The Pistolet De Bord Maritime, Modele 1786, Manufacture Nationale De Tulle Circa 1792

A Superb, Really Rare, French, Napoleonic Short Sea Service Boarding Pistol. The Pistolet De Bord Maritime, Modele 1786, Manufacture Nationale De Tulle Circa 1792

Used in the French navy during the Battles of the Nile and Trafalgar. Very good, tight and crisp action. Likely a war trophy of Trafalgar. French sea service pistols are far more rare than their British equivalents, due to the fact there were fewer French ships, and that so many French ships-of-the-line being captured or sunk by the British Royal Navy, between the 1790's to 1805 Such as when the French Fleet was soundly thrashed in the Egypt campaign at the Nile in 1798, and a little later the French and Spanish fleet, in 1805, were once again soundly thrashed and captured by Admiral Nelson at Cape Trafalgar.

The Battle of the Nile, was a battle that was one of the greatest victories of the British admiral Horatio Nelson. It was fought on August 1, 1798, between the British and French fleets in Abū Qīr Bay, near Alexandria, Egypt.

The French Revolutionary general Napoleon Bonaparte in 1798 made planned for an invasion of Egypt in order to constrict Britain’s trade routes and threaten its possession of India. The British government heard that a large French naval expedition was to sail from a French Mediterranean port under the command of Napoleon Bonaparte

Determined to find the French fleet, he sailed to Egypt once more, and on August 1 1798 he sighted the main French fleet of 13 ships of the line and 4 frigates under Admiral François-Paul Brueys d’Aigailliers at anchor in Abū Qīr Bay.

Although there were but a few hours left until nightfall and Brueys’s ships were in a strong defensive position, being securely ranged in a sandy bay that was flanked on one side by a shore battery on Abū Qīr Island, Nelson gave orders to attack at once. Several of the British warships were able to maneuver around the head of the French line of battle and thus got inside and behind their position. Fierce fighting ensued, during which Nelson himself was wounded in the head. The climax came at about 10:00 PM, when Brueys’s 120-gun flagship, L’Orient, which was by far the largest ship in the bay, blew up with most of the ship’s company, including the admiral. The fighting continued for the rest of the night; just two of Brueys’s ships of the line and a pair of French frigates escaped destruction or capture by the British. The British suffered about 900 casualties, the French about 9,000.

The Battle of the Nile had several important effects. It isolated Napoleon’s army in Egypt, thus ensuring its ultimate disintegration. It ensured that in due time Malta would be retaken from the French, and it both heightened British prestige and secured British control of the Mediterranean.

The Battle of Trafalgar, (October 21, 1805), was a naval engagement of the Napoleonic Wars, which established British naval supremacy for more than 100 years; it was fought west of Cape Trafalgar, Spain, between Cádiz and the Strait of Gibraltar. A fleet of 33 ships (18 French and 15 Spanish) under Admiral Pierre de Villeneuve fought a British fleet of 27 ships under Admiral Horatio Nelson.

Nelson was outnumbered, with 27 British ships of the line to 33 allied ships including the largest warship in either fleet, the Spanish Santísima Trinidad. To address this imbalance, Nelson sailed his fleet directly at the allied battle line's flank, hoping to break the line into pieces. Villeneuve had worried that Nelson might attempt this tactic but, for various reasons, had made no plans for this eventuality. The plan worked almost perfectly; Nelson's columns split the Franco-Spanish fleet in three, isolating the rear half from Villeneuve's flag aboard Bucentaure. The allied vanguard sailed off while it attempted to turn around, giving the British temporary superiority over the remainder of their fleet. In the ensuing fierce battle 20 allied ships were lost, while the British lost none.

Nelson's own HMS Victory led the front column and was almost knocked out of action. Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during the battle, and died shortly before it ended. Villeneuve was captured along with his flagship Bucentaure. He attended Nelson's funeral while a captive on parole in Britain. The senior Spanish fleet officer, Admiral Federico Gravina, escaped with the remnant of the Franco-Spanish fleet (a third of the original number of ships); he died five months later of wounds sustained during the battle.

The victory confirmed the naval supremacy Britain had established during the course of the eighteenth century, and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy. The belt hook was removed in its working life. Belt hook screw mount still remains in place  read more

Code: 25204

3995.00 GBP

A Cased Very Fine English Transitional Percussion Rifled Revolver. This Fine Cased Revolver Set is An Absolute Beauty To Behold.

A Cased Very Fine English Transitional Percussion Rifled Revolver. This Fine Cased Revolver Set is An Absolute Beauty To Behold.

Decorative engraving to the side plate, bar hammer and butt-cap. Finely chequered grips. Complete in it's original wooden carrying case containing a copper powder flask, steel bullet mold. Cap box and brass tipped wooden clearing rod. Overall length of the pistol inches. The blue baize lined case measures inches with a brass plaque to the lid. The action in very good working order and in excellent condition retaining some of it's original blued finish. A development from the pepper-box was the transitional revolver. This weapon uses the same action but with one barrel attached to the front of a pepper-box cylinder. James Ewell Brown “Jeb” Stuart (1833-1864) was a U.S. Army officer and later a Major General and cavalry commander for the Confederate States of America during the Civil War (1861-65). In 1857 he was shot in the chest at point blank range with a pepper-box by a Cheyenne warrior, Stuart survived probably due rumour has it, to a very weak powder charge. Guns of this type also saw use in the Mexican War as an alternative to the Colt revolver, most notably by General Winfield Scott. During the Mexican-American War (April 25, 1846 – February 3, 1848) U.S. forces under General Winfield Scott entered Mexico City and raise the American flag over the Hall of Montezuma, concluding a devastating advance that began with an amphibious landing at Vera Cruz six months earlier.

A fine example of an English percussion transitional revolver in its original case retaining much of its original finish.  read more

Code: 25205

2450.00 GBP

Fabulous Arrived Here Now All To be Shown Soon, Some Already Are, At The Lanes Armoury, From Our Conservation Workshop

Fabulous Arrived Here Now All To be Shown Soon, Some Already Are, At The Lanes Armoury, From Our Conservation Workshop

A wonderful selection of Napoleonic wars period weaponry and militaria. Including original and rare French weapons, pistols, swords, British muskets and swords.A stunning English blunderbuss, an early mortar cannon, and a Japanese kabuto, and edged weapons. An amazing very early 1840's English cased revolver, with much original finish and tools. and supposedly a lock of Nelson's hair made into a stunning lyre brooch. See in this gallery photos of just two of the fabulous pieces and will be added over the next day or so

The Lanes Armoury is many things, including, but not exclusively, Europe’s Leading Original Samurai Sword & Armoury Antiques Gallery.

After over 50 years personal experience as a partner and director by Mark, since 1971, and over 40 years by David, we are Europe’s leading original samurai sword gallery, with hundreds of swords to view and buy online 24/7, or in our gallery in Brighton on a personal visit, 6 days a week.
It has been said that the Hawkins family have, in their sword dealing history, handled, bought and sold more original Japanese swords than any other sword dealers outside of Japan since World War I, numbering well into the tens of thousands of samurai weapons. In fact we still know of no better and varied original samurai sword selection, for sale under one roof, anywhere in the world today outside of Japan, or possibly, even within it. Hundreds of antique pieces for sale to choose from, and some up to 800 years old. We have had personal dealings {both buying and selling} with curators, experts and collectors from numerous leading museums around the world, {including Japan}. Such as The Tower of London, and the Metropolitan Museum in New York. And Mark’s personal antiques mentor in the 1970’s was Edward ‘Ted’ Dale, when he was Managing Director and chief auctioneer of one of the worlds leading auction houses, Bonhams of Knightsbridge, London.

Both Mark and David can usually be found here at the gallery and shop, most days, often buried under a pile of swords, pistols, books and bayonets. It is always the case of ‘take us as you find us’ as they say, but they are both always delighted to chat about everything swords, guns, books and history, with no purchase necessary!

In memoriam
For over 30 years we had the enjoyment of the company of the late Christopher Fox as our consultant on Nihonto. A great friend to us all, and one of the most modest and knowledgable experts on Japanese swords in England. Also he was a member of the leading European sword appreciation society for several decades, and a student and instructor of the martial art of Iaido for four decades. The second in command so to speak of sensei Roald Knutsen, one of the worlds greatest experts and author on samurai polearms. {Chris was also a whizz on all things of a military nature from 20th century Germany.}


Did you know? the most valuable sword in the world today is a samurai sword, it belongs to an investment fund and has appeared illustrated in the Forbes 400 magazine. It is valued by them at $100 million, it is a tachi from the late Koto period 16th century and unsigned. Its blade is grey and now has no original polish remaining.  read more

Code: 25201

Price
on
Request

A Most Fine King George IIIrd Boxlock Flintlock By Bolton of London, Named for its Owner William Seal of Amington

A Most Fine King George IIIrd Boxlock Flintlock By Bolton of London, Named for its Owner William Seal of Amington

effectively with built-in provenance. Made by John H Bolton, London and inscribed to its owner on the barrel. The pistol has excellent original finish and has just returned from a 'no expense spared' gunsmith service and the action is now as crisp as you could wish. Concealed trigger and sliding safety, Tower of London proved barrel, turn off barrel for breech loading. Super walnut grip. Unlike most firearms which have the hammer located off to the side of the pistol, a boxlock pistol had the hammer located directly on top of the pistol. They were called a boxlocks because all of the working mechanisms for the hammer and the trigger was located in a box or receiver directly below the top mounted hammer. While the hammer obstructed the aim of the user, this system had the advantage of making the gun more compact and concealable than other pistols. The first boxlock pistols were flintlock and where later made in percussion lock. Unlike modern firearms, these pistols were not mass produced, but were hand made in gunsmith's workshops. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables. Shown for illustration purposes only with a typical powder flask, as it would once have used  read more

Code: 23548

945.00 GBP

Superb Indo Persian 18th Century Silver Decor Hilted Sword With Damascus Blade

Superb Indo Persian 18th Century Silver Decor Hilted Sword With Damascus Blade

A superb Moghul, period sword, with a very good Damascus steel blade. Silver decorated iron Lahore hilt decorated with stunning design with matching lined cap pommel. Strong and powerful blade of substance. There are clear indications that this particular hilt is of Punjab manufacture: the fat vase shape of the grip section, the slightly forward angle of the quillons and the beautiful silver koftgari.

A sword as popular within the Sikh Empire as the Mughal Empire.

The hilt [also known as tulwar] comprises langets with lotus-head outlines, domed quillons, and a centrally swollen grip. A knuckle guard with a terminal that recurves toward the disc-pommel which has been attached with a pointed sunburst plaque, a decorative feature further fitted at its centre with a dome and lotus bud finial.

Emperor Aurangzeb was the last significant Mughal emperor of India. His reign lasted from 1658 to 1707. During this phase, the empire had reached its largest geographical expansion. Nevertheless it was during this time period that the first sign of decline of the great Moghul Empire was noticed. The reasons were many. The bureaucracy became corrupted and the army implemented outdated tactics and obsolete weaponry. The Moghul Empire was descended from Turko-Mongol, Rajputorigins. It reigned a significant part of the subcontinent of Asia from the initial part of the 16th century to the middle of the 19th century. When it was at the peak of its power, around the 18th century, it controlled a major part of the Asian subcontinent and portions of the current Afghanistan. To understand it's wealth and influence, in 1600 the Emperor Akbar had revenues from his empire of ?17.5 million pounds, and 200 years later, in 1800, the exchequer of the entire British Empire had revenues of just ?16 million pounds. 31 inch blade [measured across the curve]. No scabbard  read more

Code: 22647

995.00 GBP

Roman 1st century, Large, Lead Sling Bullet, Acquired Near Camulodunum-Colchester-In the 1820's

Roman 1st century, Large, Lead Sling Bullet, Acquired Near Camulodunum-Colchester-In the 1820's

From part four of our original ancient arrow heads, spears, lead sling bullets, antiquities and rings from an 1820 Grand Tour Collection. The Battle of Camulodunum, also known as the Massacre of the Ninth Legion, was the major military victory of the Iceni and their allies over an organised Roman army during the revolt of Boudica against the Roman occupation of Britain. A large vexillation of the Legio IX Hispana were destroyed by the rebels. While attempting to relieve the besieged colonia of Camulodunum (Colchester, Essex), legionaries of the Legio IX Hispana led by Quintus Petillius Cerialis, were attacked by a horde of British tribes, led by the Iceni. Possibly 80% of the Roman foot-soldiers were killed in the battle. The event is recorded by the historian Tacitus in his Annals. The Iberian auxiliaries or legionaries were the most famous of the Roman 'slingers' in the roman armies.In AD 60 or 61, the southeastern area of the island rose in revolt under Boudica, while the Roman governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, was campaigning in Wales. The Iceni were joined by the Trinovantes, and their first target was Camulodunum, formerly the Trinovantian capital, now a colonia or settlement of discharged Roman soldiers. Tacitus reports it was poorly defended, and archaeology confirms its former military fortifications had been levelled by this time. The colonists appealed for aid to the procurator, Catus Decianus, who sent only two hundred auxiliaries. Camulodunum was burned, and the temple, where the last of the defenders took refuge, fell after a two-day siege. The defenders were massacred.
The Ninth Legion, commanded by Quintus Petillius Cerialis, attempted to relieve the siege. It is unlikely that the entire legionary strength of some 5,000 men was involved in the battle. Detachments of the legion were spread out across a network of small forts; on short notice, Cerialis was likely able to call on only the first cohort, possibly two others, auxiliary infantry, and a unit of some 500 cavalry - a total of perhaps 2,500 men. Cerialis set out from his base in Lindum Colonia (Lincoln). From Lindum, it was a distance of at least 110 miles. They may have taken the Roman road to Camulodunum from Durovigtum (Godmanchester, Cambridgeshire), a march of some 75 miles which would have taken three days.

However, they arrived too late to relieve the colonia. The British tribes had gathered a considerable force by the time Cerialis and the Ninth approached Camulodunum. They overwhelmed the detachment in the field and defeated it, routing the Romans. Tacitus says their entire infantry strength was wiped out, with only Cerialis and his cavalry able to retreat to their fortified camp. According to George Patrick Welch, "In the initial contact and later rear-guard actions he lost about 2,000 men, or one-third of his infantry strength."
Slingers wore three slings. A large one tightened to the waist (to be used in distances of more than 60 metres.), a small, one tightened around his forehead (range 20-25 metres.) and a medium size one always on the hand (with a range up to 60 mts.). They carried the bullets in a goat fur bag hanging from the shoulder. With the large one they could launch 500 grams stones (like a tennis ball) that were able to destroy shields and wood defences. With the small and medium size slings the lead bullets could perforate at short distances (up to 60 metres.) thin armours and helmets. The sling as a weapon was widely used not only by Balearic warriors but by other Iberian warriors and also by Roman auxiliary troops like Greeks, Sicilians, North Africans, but after the Roman conquest of the Balearic Islands elite slingers were always the Balearic that fought in the legions of Julius Caesar. Bullets are usually found on the known battle fields of the Roman conquest.


Every single item from The Lanes Armoury is accompanied by our unique Certificate of Authenticity. Part of our continued dedication to maintain the standards forged by us over the past 100 years of our family’s trading

This bullet weighs 62.5grams, and is 48mm long.  read more

Code: 23804

235.00 GBP