Antique Arms & Militaria

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A Stunning Condition & Very Fine Original Antique Bowie Knife by Manson of Sheffield, An Absolute Delightful Piece of American Civil War History

A Stunning Condition & Very Fine Original Antique Bowie Knife by Manson of Sheffield, An Absolute Delightful Piece of American Civil War History

19th century, a British import from the US Civil War period into the Wild West period. With almost all its original bright polish finish on the blade. Frosted etched motto "Never Draw Me Without Reason Nor Sheath Me Without Honour". Original nickel mounted scabbard in tooled red leather. Embossed grave vine pattern handle

The term "Bowie knife" appeared in advertising by 1835, about 8 years after the Bowie's famous sandbar knife brawl, while James Bowie was still alive. The first knife, with which Bowie became famous, allegedly was designed by Jim Bowie's brother Rezin in Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana and smithed by blacksmith Jesse Clift out of an old file. Period court documents indicate that Rezin Bowie and Clifft were well acquainted with one another. Rezin's granddaughter claimed in an 1885 letter to Louisiana State University that she personally witnessed Clift make the knife for her grandfather.
This knife became famous as the knife used by Bowie at the Sandbar Fight, a famous 1827 duel between Bowie and several men including a Major Norris Wright of Alexandria, Louisiana. The fight took place on a sandbar in the Mississippi River across from Natchez, Mississippi, and is the only documented fight in which Bowie was known to have employed his Bowie knife design. In this battle Bowie was stabbed, shot, and beaten half to death but managed to win the fight using the large knife.
From context, "Bowie knife" needed no description then, but the spelling was variable. Among the first mentions was a plan to combine a Bowie knife and pistol. Cutlers were shipping sheath knives from Sheffield England by the early 1830s. By 1838 a writer in a Baltimore newspaper (posted from New Orleans) suggested that every reader had seen a Bowie knife.

The Bowie knife found its greatest popularity in the Old Southwest of the mid-19th century, where several knife fighting schools were established to teach students the art of fighting with the Bowie knife pattern.

Bowie knives had a role in the American conflicts of the nineteenth century. They are historically mentioned in the independence of Texas, in the Mexican War, the California gold rush, the civil strife in Kansas, the Civil War and later conflicts with the American Indians. John Brown (the abolitionist) carried a Bowie (which was taken by J. E. B. Stuart). John Wilkes Booth (assassin of Abraham Lincoln) dropped a large Bowie knife as he escaped. "Buffalo Bill" Cody reportedly scalped a sub-chief in 1876 in revenge for Custer (the Battle of War bonnet Creek).

The popularity of the Bowie knife declined late in the nineteenth century. Large calibre reliable revolvers were available by the mid-1870s, reducing a knife advantage. The frontier rapidly vanished, reducing the number of hunters and trappers. Large knives had limited utility, so Bowies shrunk.
This is a superb small example perfect for boot or ladies garter concealment. 9.75 inches overall, 5 inch blade. Only the scabbard throat button is lacking, very small grey finger print staining to small areas of the blade  read more

Code: 22760

875.00 GBP

A Most Rare & Beautiful US Civil War Moore's Patent 32 Cal. 'Teat Fire' Revolver.

A Most Rare & Beautiful US Civil War Moore's Patent 32 Cal. 'Teat Fire' Revolver.

A rare Moore's patent .32 cal. Teat Fire revolver. Finely engraved silver plated frame, birds head butt. Good action. Fine over lacquered grips. The Teat Fire system, patented by Moore, was a most unusual front loading cartridge action, and his .45 calibre version, of the same action gun, is one of the rarest and most collectable guns of that era. Designed and made in 1864, during the Civil War, this is a very fine pocket sized revolver that saw much good service as a back-up or defensive arm for officers, and was very popular with riverboat and saloon gamblers, such as Doc Holliday and George Devol. There is a picture of an antique 19th century poster advertising Devol's gambling book. For information only not included. It utilized a special .32 caliber teat-fire cartridge designed by Daniel Moore and David Williamson. It was loaded from the front with the "teat" to the rear.
This 6 shot revolver has a 3?" barrel. Overall it measures 7-1/8" It has a fine silver plated frame. The barrel has some remaining original deep blue finish. The bird's head butt has 2 piece walnut grips. This model has a small hinged swivel gate on the right side of the barrel lug in front of the cylinder that prevents the cartridges from falling out after they are inserted.
The barrel markings are "MOORE'S PAT. FIREARMS CO. BROOKLYN, N.Y.", in a single line on the top. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables  read more

Code: 22540

795.00 GBP

A Stunning & Rare Victorian US Civil War Period 'Whitworth' Rifle, One Of The Best Condition Examples We Have See in Over 20 Years

A Stunning & Rare Victorian US Civil War Period 'Whitworth' Rifle, One Of The Best Condition Examples We Have See in Over 20 Years

With an absolutely mouthwatering patina, as good as any Whitworth we have seen in the finest museum collections. Serial number 198. One of the most famous types of rifles used by snipers in the US Civil War in the 1860's. In fact they can be such a significant and rare weapon that with known Confederate provenence with correct serial numbering stamping and the like a Whitworth rifle value has been known to approach $100,000 in today's collectors market. Sadly, this fabulous arm has no known provenence surviving, however, it is a most intriguing and an even rarer example in some respects, in that it was converted in the 1870's to the improved 'Snider' breech loading configuration. We have never seen another surviving example of a Snider converted 'Whitworth' rifle before in over 50 years. From hundreds of yards away, a Confederate sharpshooter carefully aimed his prized Whitworth, the crosshairs of its Davidson telescopic sight outlined against the ramparts of Fort Stevens in Washington, D.C. Through the scope?fitted to the left side of the stock?his eye scanned the ample crowd of Union soldiers and plucky civilians who had ventured by, hoping to observe warfare up close. Suddenly, the shooter?s attention shifted to a tall bearded man wearing a stovepipe hat, realizing it was that Yankee president, within easy range of his English-made precision rifle. As he prepared to fire, though, a Federal officer dragged Abraham Lincoln out of view. When issued, the rifles came with specific rules of engagement. The Whitworth sharpshooter would only use his gun against high-value targets. Artillery positions, cavalry scouts, exposed officers, and enemy sharpshooters were fair game. Furthermore, they were free to operate independently, choosing their own targets and locations on the battlefield. Some Confederate generals?especially Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne of the Army of Tennessee consolidated their sharpshooters into dedicated companies, using them to divert enemy forces where needed.

While many high-ranking Union officers had fallen victim to sharpshooters armed with Whitworth rifles, Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick, in command of the 6th Corps at Spotsylvania, was the most noteworthy witness to their effectiveness. Sedgwick was no stranger to enemy bullets, having been wounded several times prior to Spotsylvania. Ironically, he was hit but not injured by a spent bullet on May 8, 1864. The next day, his luck ran out. The story of the Whitworth and the Civil War; What the Confederacy needed as it prepared for war was a means of equalizing the disparity in arms fielded by the industrially superior North. Unable to produce what they needed, the South looked abroad. Arms buyers secretly visiting Great Britain obtained contracts for hundreds of thousands of regular P1853 Enfield rifles, and many other munitions that could be sent home by blockade-runners. But the available Whitworths were costly and difficult to come by.

Under wartime conditions, the price of a Whitworth rifle quickly jumped from $100 to $500, then again to $1,000 an expensive proposition considering how many regular muskets and rifles that same sum could buy, a Colt revolver in 1863 for example was just $20, and that was considered an expensive pistol at the time. $1,000 then was a simply mind boggling sum by today's standards. The Whitworth projectiles made by swaging, a unique forging process were difficult for the South to manufacture, so cylindrical bullet molds were added to shipments to supplement the smaller stores of hexagonal ammunition. These cylindrical molds then went to Southern arsenals to produce additional loads for distribution once the British rounds had run out. Overall 52 inches long As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables  read more

Code: 23154

5750.00 GBP

A Fabulous, and Rare,  19th Century Imperial Russo-Prussian Grenadier's Mitre Cap

A Fabulous, and Rare, 19th Century Imperial Russo-Prussian Grenadier's Mitre Cap

A most rarely surviving form of European service helmet. The highly distinctive mitre cap was in use by grenadier regiments of three principle nations [mostly British, Prussian and Russian] since the mid 18th century, they were used continually by the Russo-Prussians alone into the Napoleonic wars, in the early 19th century, right though in fact to the early 20th century, but they ceased to be used by the British in the end of the 18th century. The mitre cap is an extraordinary form of helmet that was both elaborate and decorative but also as a form of intimidation, to increase the perception of the height of a grenadier, yet still most functional for defence against sword cuts and slashes. Wih the helmets construction, a combination of cloth and pressed metal, creating a most effective ‘crumple zone’ against a slashing blade impact upon the soldiers head. The rarest of all the surviving mitre caps is beyond doubt the British, as they were in use for the shortest period of time and were entirely made of cloth, and that material survives poorly over 3 centuries. The Russian and Prussian examples had elements of metal within the helmets stamped crest frontispieces and frame, and, they were in use for longer, some into the WW1 period. However, all surviving examples are now very scarce indeed, and complete examples are most especially rare. The 18th and 19th century examples being the most rarest of all. The mitre cap, whether in stiffened cloth or metal, had become the distinguishing feature of the grenadier in the armies of Britain, Russia, Prussia and most German states during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. While Northern-European armies such as Britain, Russia, Sweden and various German states (perhaps most famously Prussia) wore the mitre cap, the southern countries, such as France, Spain, Austria, Portugal and various Italian states preferred the bearskin cap. By 1768 Britain too had adopted the bearskin. By the advent of the Napoleonic Wars, both mitres caps and fur caps had begun to fall out of use in favour of the shako. Two major exceptions were France's Grande Armee (although in 1812, regulations changed grenadier uniforms to those more similar to the ones of fusiliers, except in guard regiments) and the Austrian Army. After the Battle of Friedland in 1807, because of their distinguished performance, Russia's Pavlovsk Regiment were allowed to keep their mitre caps and were admitted to the Imperial Guard. In 1914 the Imperial German and Russian Armies still included a number of grenadier regiments. In the Russian Army these comprised the Grenadier Guards Regiment (L-G Grenadierski Polk) as well as the Grenadier Corps of sixteen regiments (plus an independent reinforced company of Palace Grenadiers, guarding the St. Petersburg Imperial residences). Five regiments of the Prussian Guard were designated as Garde-Grenadiers and there were an additional fourteen regiment of grenadiers amongst the line infantry of the German Empire. In both the Russian and German armies the grenadier regiments were considered a historic elite, distinguished by features such as plumed helmets in full dress, distinctive facings (yellow for all Russian grenadiers) or special braiding. A grenadier derived from the word grenade, and was originally a specialized soldier, first established as a distinct role in the mid-to-late 17th century, for the throwing of grenades and sometimes assault operations. At that time grenadiers were chosen from the strongest and largest soldiers. By the 18th century, dedicated grenade throwing of this sort was no longer relevant, but grenadiers were still chosen for being the most physically powerful soldiers and would lead assaults in the field of battle. Grenadiers would also often lead the storming of fortification breaches in siege warfare, although this role was more usually fulfilled by all-arm units of volunteers called forlorn hopes, and might also be fulfilled by sappers or pioneers. A very similar, near identical example appears illustrated and described in the The Lyle Official Arms and Armour Review 1983, page 261  read more

Code: 22034

3950.00 GBP

An Iconic Symbol of Antique Weaponry, and An Exceptionally Fine 18th Century Brass Cannon-Barrel ‘Royal Navy’ Form Blunderbuss by John Rea of London

An Iconic Symbol of Antique Weaponry, and An Exceptionally Fine 18th Century Brass Cannon-Barrel ‘Royal Navy’ Form Blunderbuss by John Rea of London

A very fine example with finest juglans regia walnut stock with exceptional patina, fine brass furniture finely engraved throughout. Acorn finial trigger guard and brass cannon barrel with Tower proofs. This blunderbuss is of the so-called "cannon mouth" pattern. It is typical of the British Naval blunderbuss and dates from circa 1780. This type of weapon fires a multitude of shot about .25 inch in diameter. John Rea is listed as working in London from 1782 to 1793. The Blunderbuss (born of the Dutch word "Donderbus", appropriately meaning "Thunder Pipe" or "Thunder Gun") came to prominence in the early part of the 18th Century (1701-1800) and was more akin to the modern day shotgun than a "long gun" musket or heavy pistol of the time.

As such, she excelled in close-in fighting, be it within the confines of naval warfare where her spread of shot could inflict maximum damage to targets at close ranges. Its manageable size, coupled with its spread shot, ensured some level of accuracy for even the novice user and its appearance was rather intimidating to those unfortunate enough to be staring down the business end.
Even George Washington championed the Blunderbuss

16 inch barrel 31 inches long overall. As with all our antique guns no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables  read more

Code: 20654

SOLD

A Supurb Trafalger Period Navy Rum, Stoneware Ceramic Rum Barrel, with King George IIIrd Royal Crest And Lions, & 'Fore and Aft' Barrel Tap Apertures

A Supurb Trafalger Period Navy Rum, Stoneware Ceramic Rum Barrel, with King George IIIrd Royal Crest And Lions, & 'Fore and Aft' Barrel Tap Apertures

One imagine the Royal Naval officer's availing themselves daily of tots of rum. For meals, the officer's were supplied with decanted Port.

This is a simply superb navy rum barrel, stunningly impress decorated throughout the whole surface. with the Hanovarian royal crest of the Lion and Unicorn with lion surmounted crown, over the Hanovarian garter and shield. To the base of the crest are twin facing lions, in the same seated pose as can be seen at the base of Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square.

Prior to 1655, a sailor's ration of alcoholic beverage was originally beer with a daily ration of one gallon (i.e. eight pints). This official allowance continued until after the Napoleonic Wars. When beer was not available, as it would often spoil easily, it could be substituted by a pint of wine or half a pint of spirits depending on what was locally available. In 1655, the difficulty in storing the large quantities of liquid required led to beer's complete replacement with spirits, with the political influence of the West Indian planters giving rum preference over arrack and other spirits. The half-pint of spirits was originally issued neat; it is said that sailors would "prove" its strength by checking that gunpowder doused with rum would still burn (thus verifying that rum was at least 57% ABV).

The practice of compulsorily diluting rum in the proportion of half a pint to one quart of water was first introduced in 1740 by Admiral Edward Vernon (known as Old Grog, because of his habitual grogram cloak). The ration was also split into two servings, one between 10 am and noon and the other between 4 and 6 pm. In 1795 Navy regulations required adding small quantities of lemon or lime juice to the ration, to prevent scurvy. The rum itself was often procured from distillers in Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago and the British Virgin Islands. Rations were cut in half in 1823 and again in half, to the traditional amount, one-eighth of an imperial pint in 1850.

The abolition of the rum ration had been discussed in Parliament in 1850 and again in 1881 however nothing came of it. However, one dark day in 1970, Admiral Peter Hill-Norton abolished the rum ration as he felt it could have led to sailors failing a breathalyser test and being less capable to manage complex machinery.
This decision to end the rum ration was made after the Secretary of State for Defence had taken opinions from several ranks of the Navy. Ratings were instead allowed to purchase beer, and the amount allowed was determined, according to the MP David Owen, by the amount of space available for stowing the extra beer in ships. The last rum ration was on 31 July 1970 and became known as Black Tot Day as sailors were unhappy about the loss of the rum ration. There were reports that the day involved sailors throwing tots into the sea and the staging of a mock funeral in a training camp. In place of the rum ration, sailors were allowed to buy three one-half imperial pint cans of beer a day and improved recreational facilities. While the rum ration was abolished, the order to "splice the mainbrace", awarding sailors an extra tot of rum for good service, remained as a command which could only be given by the Monarch and is still used to recognise good service. Rum rations are also given on special occasions: in recent years, examples included the 100th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Navy in 2010 and after the Queen's Diamond Jubilee celebrations in 2012.
Heavy stoneware, around 8 kilos {guess} size, 17 inches high 13 inches across/  read more

Code: 25216

495.00 GBP

A Simply Wondrous, And An Absolute Beauty of a Set of Cased, Double Barrelled Sporting Gun 1835, Maker to The King. Master Gunsmith, W Parker of London

A Simply Wondrous, And An Absolute Beauty of a Set of Cased, Double Barrelled Sporting Gun 1835, Maker to The King. Master Gunsmith, W Parker of London

A finest, original cased English double Damascus barrelled sporting gun by one of England's pre-eminent makers of the 19th century, William Parker of 233 High Holborn, gun maker to Prince Edward, to King William IV (1830-1837) and the Duke of Kent. The whole gun's mounts are hand engraved with superlative skill and expertise, it features, pheasants, a gun dog, dolphin hammers a stunning pineapple finial to the trigger guard and profuse scrolling arabesques. The stock is the finest Juglans Regia walnut and the mahogany case bears its original baize lining and maker label. It is fully fitted throughout with essential equipment and tools including a signed copper powder flask, a shoulder mounted bandolier type shot flask, a percussion cap tin, a gun fitted ram rod, and a separate case ram/cleaning rod, oil bottle, and a most rare shot-pouring funnel, nipple key and screw driver. To replace such a fine hand made gun today, likely only Purdey or Boss of London could have the skills required to replicate it. A fine engraved Purdey side by side, with a pair of Damas barrels, costs today ?113,500, with an 18 months to 2 year waiting time, and additional costs for casing and tools. When John Field died in 1791, William Parker went into partnership with his widow (name not known), and they traded as Field & Parker. John Field had been a goldsmith, sword cutler and gun maker at 233 High Holborn from 1783 to 1791, trading under his own name and also as Field & Co and Field & Clarke (William Clarke of Duke Street, Portland Place). In 1793, William Parker bought John Field's widow's share of the partnership. From that date he ceased being a goldsmith. In 1803, on John Brown's bankruptcy, he appears to have bought the rights to Joseph Hall's "New Invented Hammer" patent (No. 2573 of 1802 - waterproof primer and steel)from John Brown, and he used George Dodd's 1805 patented lock. In 1803 he started to supply the London Police Offices with guns. In 1804 William Parker became a Contractor to Ordnance. In 1806 Parker opened additional workshops at 22 Chamber Street, these moved in 1808 to 52 & 31-32 Chamber Street.

In 1814 the firm rented additional production facilities at John Stinton's workshops in Glasshouse Yard. In about 1814 William Parker's daughter, Mary, married John Field Jnr. From 1820 to 1826 William was recorded at 60 Theobalds Road (workshop). In 1829 William Parker started to supply guns to the Metropolitan Police (London Police Offices re-named). At some time William Parker became gun maker to Prince Edward, then to King William IV (1830-1837) and the Duke of Kent. In 1833 William became a contractor to the East India Company, and in 1837 a contractor to the Hudson's Bay Company. The double-barrelled sporting gun was seen as a weapon of prestige and authority, especially in the days of the East India Company and the later Raj in India, where it was known as Dunali (literally "two pipes"). It was especially valued in Bihar, Purvanchal, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and Punjab

In 1838 Ordnance contract ended and the firm moved their workshops to 10 Chamber Street. In 1841 William Parker died, aged 68, and John Field Jnr and his sons trading as Parker, Field & Sons took over. This fabulous gun is in overall excellent condition. As with all our antique guns, no license is required as they are all unrestricted antique collectables  read more

Code: 22880

9995.00 GBP

A Rare & Incredible Gilbert Islands Shark’s Tooth Kiribati Warriors Sword. In the Native Culture of The Islands It Is Called a Tebute.

A Rare & Incredible Gilbert Islands Shark’s Tooth Kiribati Warriors Sword. In the Native Culture of The Islands It Is Called a Tebute.

A rarely seen {we have only had two in 15 years}, late 19th to early 20th century shark tooth sword, known as a tebute and was unique to the Gilbert Islands of Micronesia, the islands today are known as the nation of Kiribati.

The sword is made from seasoned wood of the coconut palm with cutting edges made from sharks teeth attached with fine fibrous cords. Most of these swords were destroyed by the maritime visitors to the islands. Kiribati has a history of contrived and ritualized duels. The armour was made of thickly woven sennit, a kind of coconut fibre. The duellists wore helmets made of blowfish remains. The helmets were resilient and, due to the structure of blowfish, covered with many points, which had the ability of damaging weapons. The weapons resembled broadswords with a serrated edge created with many shark teeth. The duels were performed mostly for the purpose of settling disputes and maintaining honour. The practicality of the duels is debatable. Due to the difficulty of moving in this armour, falling over and becoming unable to get back up was common enough that duel assistants were required. Kiribati has been known for its traditional martial arts which were kept within the secrets of several families for generations. The Kiribati arts of fighting as opposed to Asian martial arts are not often mentioned or even advertised to be known by the general public. Though, there may be some noticeable parallels in principle to that of Asian martial arts, they are merely really different. For instance, generally, there is no kicking as in Karate kicks or Kung Fu kicks, and speed is more important than power. A list of some of these traditional martial arts is as follows: Nabakai, Nakara, Ruabou, Tabiang, Taborara, Tebania, Temata-aua, Te Rawarawanimon, and Terotauea.

The essence of Kiribati traditional martial arts is the magical power of the spirits of the ancestral warriors. All these martial arts skills share one thing in common. That is, they came from an ancestral spirit.

"Nabakai" is a martial art from the island of Abaiang originated from the person named Nabakai. Nabakai was a member of the crab clan called "Tabukaokao". The three ancestral female spirits of this clan "Nei Tenaotarai", "Nei Temwanai" and "Nei Tereiatabuki" which usually believed to manifest themselves with a female crab came to him and taught him the fighting art. Overall 61 cm long.  read more

Code: 20923

1200.00 GBP

A Very Fine, Late Middle Ages, Early Hand-Bombard, Iron Mortar Cannon. The Earliest Form of Ignition Battle Weapon That Developed into The Hand Pistole & Blunderbuss

A Very Fine, Late Middle Ages, Early Hand-Bombard, Iron Mortar Cannon. The Earliest Form of Ignition Battle Weapon That Developed into The Hand Pistole & Blunderbuss

Used in both the field of combat or from a castle battlement. This fine piece would make a wonderful display piece, perhaps set on a small plinth. Ideal for a desk, bookshelf or mantle.

The weapon that provided the name to the Royal Artillery rank of bombardier, and the word 'bombardment'.

A hand bombard was the larger version of the handgonne or hand cannon, yes still a good size for handling.
Small enough and light enough to be manoeuvred by hand and thus then loosely fixed, or semi-permanently fixed, in either an L shaped wooden block and used like a mortar, or, onto a length of sturdy wooden haft, from three feet to five foot long to be used almost musket like and bound with wrought iron bands see illustration in the photo gallery of these medievil variations of mounting. The precursor to the modern day pistol and musket from which this form of ancient so called handgonne developed into over the centuries. It is thought that gunpowder was invented in China and found its way to Europe in the 13th Century. In the mid to late 13th Century gunpowder began to be used in cannons and handguns, and by the mid 14th Century they were in relatively common use for castle sieges. By the end of the 14th Century both gunpowder, guns and cannon had greatly evolved and were an essential part of fortifications which were being modified to change arrow slits for gun loops. Bombards and Hand cannon' date of origin ranges around 1350. Hand bombards and hand cannon were relatively inexpensive to manufacture, but the skill required to make them was considerable, but they were not that accurate to fire. Nevertheless, they were employed for their shock value. In 1492 Columbus carried one on his discovery exploration to the Americas.
Conquistadors Hernando Cortez and Francisco Pizzaro also used them, in 1519 and 1533, during their respective conquests and colonization of Mexico and Peru. Not primary arms of war, hand bombards and hand cannon were adequate tools of protection for fighting men.

See Funcken, L. & Funcken F., Le costume, l'armure et les armes au temps de la chevalerie, de huitieme au quinzieme siecle, Tournai,1977, pp.66-69, for reconstruction of how such hand cannons were used.
At the beginning of the 14th century, among the infantry troops of the Western Middle Ages, developed the use of manual cannons (such as the Italian schioppetti, spingarde, and the German Fusstbusse).

Photo of the hand bombard recovered from the well at Cardiff Castle, by Simon Burchell - Own work

External width at the muzzle 3.25 inches, length 8 inches. Weight 10.2 pounds  read more

Code: 25213

2695.00 GBP

Most Attractive, Antique, 19th Century Fire Bucket Decorated in Scarlet Red Livery, with Royal Crest. Such A Colour Is Synonymous With Britain. The Redcoats of the Royal Guard, The Red Pillar Boxes, Even Red Telephone Boxes & Once, The Entire British Army

Most Attractive, Antique, 19th Century Fire Bucket Decorated in Scarlet Red Livery, with Royal Crest. Such A Colour Is Synonymous With Britain. The Redcoats of the Royal Guard, The Red Pillar Boxes, Even Red Telephone Boxes & Once, The Entire British Army

It shows the same crest that one would find on fixtures and fittings within in a British royal residence. It’s condition for its purpose is very good, just natural aging and wear throughout.

Fire aboard a wooden ship or residence was a constant peril, from such as burning powder shot or cannon fire, or even from an enemy fire ship, and could be the destruction of a vessel and crew in a very short time, if not subdued as quickly as possible. Thus good and sturdy leather fire buckets were an essential piece of Royal Naval equipment aboard every vessel. We show in the gallery a row in an Earls stately home, and a row of Royal Naval issue fire buckets {reproductions} aboard Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory, now in permanent dock at Portsmouth.
It is still the flagship of the Royal Navy in honour of Nelsons famous victory at Trafalgar. Fire buckets have been popular with collectors and owners of period homes for a very long time, but especially the board of ordnance issue examples for naval warships. They represent a time long before most towns had established and well-equipped fire departments ready to respond at a moment’s notice to a house or shop fire, when people relied on their neighbours to come to their aid. The risk for catastrophe from fire was great. A single stand-alone house could be consumed in minutes. In towns, fire in densely populated neighbourhoods could quickly result in the destruction of dozens of buildings.

Between 1630 and 1700 Boston experienced at least six major fires that destroyed well over 200 buildings. Most fire buckets were likely purchased from merchant craftsmen who specialised in leather goods, or wholesalers who imported wares from England. The earliest reference for the sale of fire buckets in Boston comes from a 1743 newspaper where an advertisement from an unnamed merchant simply states, “A Parcel of Choice Fire Buckets to be sold.” it is very rare to find a mark or signature on a fire bucket that identifies its maker.  read more

Code: 25212

675.00 GBP